December 2004

The Newsletter
December 2004

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In this Newsletter

Just click on any of the subjects to jump straight to it

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From the editor

Keerbergen
Belgium
December 1, 2004

Hello all!

It’s late in the evening. June has gone to bed and I am sitting here finishing off the last newsletter for this year. Outside it is cold and dark. We have even had some snow already!

The last couple of weekends I have busied myself putting up some Christmas lights on the outside of the house and in the garden. I have almost finished and, even though I say this myself, it looks lovely!

 

There is a long string of little lights all along the gutter in the front with some lights in the bushes as well. Then there are some lights around the two front windows and the front door. It really looks like a Christmas tree!

In the back I put a large rope light high up in a tree winding it all the way around. When it is on at night it looks just like a host of centipedes crawling up the tree!

 

Click to see it big!

We decided not have a Christmas tree inside this year but to do the outside. Less mess and it really looks nice.

Looking back on the year all I can say is that it has been a fun year. With all my travels I have seen so much and have had so many new experiences that is is quite awesome!

It’s just the little things in life that makes it all worthwhile.

 

Click to see it big!
Click to see it big
The beauty of the snow we had in such abundance in January.
The little cart next to the road with the sunflowers somewhere in Holland.
Our trip to Spain which somehow reminded us so much of South Africa.
All the braais.
Our trip to Worthing and Stonehenge.
The hot summer nights.
My trips to Paris. Oh, how I love that town!

The beautiful forests with all those incredible colours in the Autumn.
And so I could carry on and on.

One of the nicest and most rewarding experiences has been the many nice reactions to our monthly newsletter. It has been a pleasure to do it every month.
My thanks go out to all those people sending such nice mails every month!

Thank you!

It makes me want to carry on!

 


 

So it’s December and the festive season is upon us.

We still have to get used to the fact that there is no big holiday in December. I remember from our years in South Africa that we would close the business down on the 16th of December every year and open again the second or third week in January.

Not so here. Life carries on as normal and not even Boxing Day is a holiday!

Our big summer holidays are in July/August. That’s when everything closes down and everybody goes away!

But in December it’s business as usual. It was strange to think that the the business year here starts in September and not in January so in December you have only just started!

Last Sunday it was Sinterklaas again. We always look forward to that! It’s always such a lot of fun to see the little ones a little scared that they were not all that good during the year and that Sinterklaas will have a couple of notes about that in his big red book!

In most towns Sinterklaas and all his “Zwarte Pieten” will arrive either by train, or for the lucky ones, by boat.
Everyone knows that he arrives by boat from Spain every year so to see him arriving that way is very special.

All the schools have time off for the visit by Sinterklaas and for the little ones this is the highlight of the year!

Father Christmas does not really feature in the low-lands. That is of course a bonus for children brought up in countries where he is the highlight of every December. Now they have Sinterklaas AND Father Christmas! (and Mummy and Daddy are out of pocket twice!)
This will be particularly true for Luke and Jake this year because they will be spending their Christmas in South Africa with Derek and Jeanine.

June and I will have Carol and Peter visiting from the UK for a week or so. They have never been to Belgium and it will be nice to show them a little of the country. After Christmas we will take them back to Worthing so we will also have a couple of days off.

On Christmas day we will have Tony and Catherine with the two little ones, Jessie and Caitlyn for the day. It promises to be a nice day and we are very much looking forward to it!

The other day I found a meat wholesaler at the “Early morning market” in Brussels who sells Argentinian Beef! This is probably the best beef we have ever come across in Belgium. Brilliant! And not expensive either!

For Christmas we will get a beef fillet and June will do a Beef Wellington. She is so good at it that it just cannot fail!

So, it’s the end of the year (almost) and the end of this last bit from me.

Both June and I wish you a very special Christmas and a very good, healthy and peaceful New Year!

Until next year!

Lo

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Food for thought


What’s Wrong with Gossip?

There is no law but love.
Love is joy in others.
Therefore it should be out of the question to speak about another person in a spirit of irritation or vexation.
There must never be talk, either in open remarks or by insinuation, against anyone, or against their individual characteristics — and under no circumstances behind their back.
Gossiping in one’s family is no exception.
Direct address is the brotherly or sisterly service we owe anyone whose weaknesses cause a negative reaction in us.
An open word spoken directly to another person deepens friendship and will not be resented.
Eberhard Arnold

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The history of ….


A Very Special Man!

Then, a couple of days ago it was “Sinterklaas”!

Now, “Sinterklaas” is a typically Dutch institution and you will of course find it in Belgium as well.  Where the rest of the world has “Christmas Father” the Dutch and the Belgians have “Sinterklaas”.

Of course some of the Father Christmas (Santa Klaus) has blown over here as well with all the people living here from all over the world.  But, Sinterklaas is the real original thing over here.

The story is fascinating.

 

SINTERKLAAS

The Feast of Sinterklaas, or St. Nicholas, is an annual event, which has been uniquely Dutch and Flemish for centuries. St. Nicholas’ Feast Day, December 6th, is observed in most Roman Catholic countries primarily as a feast for small children. But it is only in the Low Countries – especially in the Netherlands – that the eve of his feast day (December 5th) is celebrated nationwide by young and old, Christian and non-Christian, and without any religious overtones.

Although Sinterklaas is always portrayed in the vestments of the bishop he once was, his status as a canonized saint has had little to do with the way the Dutch think of him. Rather, he is a kind of benevolent old man, whose feast day is observed by exchanging gifts and making good-natured fun of each other.

It so happens that the legend of St. Nicholas is based on historical fact. He did actually exist. He lived from 271 A.D. to December 6th, 342 or 343.

His 4th century tomb in the town of Myra, near the city of Anatolia in present-day Turkey, has even been dug up by archaeologists.

This is his story:

Born of a wealthy family, Nicholas was brought up as a devout Christian. When his parents died of an epidemic, he distributed his wealth among the poor and became a priest.
Later he became Archbishop of Myra, and it is from here that the fame of his good deeds began to spread across the Mediterranean. Desperate sailors who called upon the Good Bishop to calm stormy seas were heard; prison walls crumbled when victims of persecution prayed to him. He saved young children from the butcher’s knife and dropped dowries into the shoes of penniless maidens. Over time, St. Nicholas became the patron saint of sailors and merchants, and especially of children.

After his death, the cult of St. Nicholas spread rapidly via southern Italy throughout the rest of the Mediterranean and eventually to coastal towns along the Atlantic and the North Sea. In the 12th and 13th centuries, Holland built no fewer than 23 churches dedicated to St. Nicholas, many of which are still standing. Amsterdam adopted St. Nicholas as its patron saint, and Rome decreed that December 6th, the anniversary of his death, should be his official Feast Day.

St. Nicholas’ strong influence in the Low Countries – an area heavily engaged in trade and navigation – was primarily due to his role as patron of sailors and merchants.
However, his fame as protector of children soon took precedence.
In the 14th century, choirboys of St. Nicholas churches were given some money and the day off on December 6th.
Somewhat later, the pupils of convent schools would be rewarded or punished by a monk dressed up as the Good Bishop, with his long white beard, his red mantle and mitre (bishop’s hat) and his golden crosier (bishop’s staff) – just as he is still presented today.

 

All Dutch children know that Sinterklaas (the name is a corruption of Sint Nikolaas) lives in Spain.
Exactly why he does remains a mystery, but that is what all the old songs and nursery rhymes say. Whatever the case may be, in Spain he spends most of the year recording the behaviour of all children in a big red book, while his helper Black Peter (Zwarte Piet) stocks up on presents for next December 5th. In the first weeks of November, Sinterklaas gets on his white horse, Peter (“Piet”) swings a huge sack full of gifts over his

shoulder, and the three of them board a steamship headed for the Netherlands. Around mid-November they arrive in a harbour town – a different one every year – where they are formally greeted by the Mayor and a delegation of citizens. Their parade through town is watched live on television by the whole country and marks the beginning of the “Sinterklaas season”

The old bishop and his helpmate are suddenly everywhere at once. At night they ride across Holland’s’ rooftops and Sinterklaas listens through the chimneys to check on the children’s behaviour. Piet jumps down the chimney flues and makes sure that the carrot or hay the children have left for the horse in their shoes by the fireplace is exchanged for a small gift or some candy. During the day, Sinterklaas and Piet are even busier, visiting schools, hospitals, department stores, restaurants, offices and many private homes. Piet rings doorbells, scatters sweets through the slightly opened doors and leaves basketfuls of presents by the front door.

How do they manage to be all over the Netherlands at once?
This is thanks to the so-called “hulp-Sinterklazen”, or Sinterklaas helpers, who dress up like the bishop and Black Peter and help them perform their duties. Children who become wise to these simultaneous “Sint-sightings” are told that since Sinterklaas cannot indeed be in two places at once, he gets a little help from his uncanonized friends.

The Dutch are busy too – shopping for, and more importantly, making presents. Tradition demands that all packages be camouflaged in some imaginative way, and that every gift be accompanied by a fitting poem. This is the essence of Sinterklaas: lots of fun on a day when people are not only allowed, but expected, to make fun of each other in a friendly way. Children, parents, teachers, employers and employees, friends and co-workers tease each other and make fun of each other’s habits and mannerisms.

Another part of the fun is how presents are hidden or disguised. Recipients often have to go on a hunt all over the house, aided by hints, to look for them. They must be prepared to dig their gifts out of the potato bin, to find them in a pudding, in a glove filled with wet sand, in some crazy dummy or doll. Working hard for your presents and working even harder to think up other peoples’ presents and get them ready is what the fun is all about.

The original poem accompanying each present is another old custom and a particularly challenging one. Here the author has a field day with his subject (the recipient of the gift). Foibles, love interests,
embarrassing incidents, funny habits and well-kept secrets are all fair game. The recipient, who is the butt of the joke, has to open his/her package in public and read the poem aloud amid general hilarity.

The real giver is supposed to remain anonymous because all presents technically come from Sinterklaas, and recipients say out loud “Thank you, Sinterklaas!”, even if they no longer believe in him. Towards December 5th, St. Nicholas poems pop up everywhere in the Netherlands: in the press, in school, at work and in both Houses of Parliament.
On the day of the 5th, most places of business close a bit earlier than normal. The Dutch head home to a table laden with the same traditional sweets and baked goods eaten for St. Nicholas as shown in the 17th-century paintings of the Old Masters.

Large chocolate letters – the first initial of each person present – serve as place settings. They share the table along with large gingerbread men and women. A basket filled with mysterious packages stands close by and scissors are at hand. Early in the evening sweets are eaten while those gathered take turns unwrapping their gifts and reading their poems out loud so that everyone can enjoy the impact of the surprise. The emphasis is on originality and personal effort rather than the commercial value of the gift, which is one reason why Sinterklaas is such a delightful event for young and old alike.


Sinterklaas is also celebrated in many other countries. Here is an example from Carol Eisler of how this is done in in Austria.

Carol writes:
One can see how many of the Christmas traditions are linked to Sinterklaas. Here is Austria he is known as Nikolo and is celebrated in pretty much the same way.
Lots of Nikolo chocolates and apples – always in a red bags – any other gifts given on this day are usually something red.
One will also find lots of costumed Nikolos all around town distributing Nikolo shaped chocolates. It is a much loved fest by the kids who only receive the “Nikolosacker” only once they have recited the poems learned at school or kindergarten.

Carol Eisler


Do you also celebrate a form of Sinterklaas or Nikolo? Why not drop us a line and tell us about it?

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Our Home Biltong Makers


The greatest stuff on Earth!!

Greetings from Iowa, the “Heartland” of the U.S.

My name is Charlie and 6 months ago I had never heard of Biltong, then I found your web site. I was cruising the net for barbeque (braai) sites and stumbled across Biltongmakers.Com!
I make about 3 or 4 pounds at a time and am on my 5th batch in 8 weeks! My biggest concern is does my Biltong taste authentic?

I am a Chiropractor and a few days ago a young man walked into my office. He is a student attending a college here in my hometown.
I heard his accent and asked where he was from, he said, South Africa! So I asked him what the first thing that comes to mind is, when I say Biltong?

His eyes got real big and he said, “The greatest stuff on Earth!”
And how do you know what Biltong is?
As it turned out his family was in the meat business and produced Biltong before they left South Africa.
I now have someone to experiment on. I want to get it right!

All that, to say this, Great Website!

Keep up the good work and thank you for introducing me to Biltong.

“The Greatest stuff on Earth!”

Charlie Crivaro
Iowa, USA

 



I am proud to say that making biltong seemed a daunting task – but after purchasing the 2kg biltong maker, it’s a breeze!

Charmaine Basson
Milnerton, Cape Town

 



You can order the new BILTONG BUDDY now by going to our order page or you can have a look at it first by clicking on the link below.
Details of the New “BILTONG BUDDY” can be found here.

More and more people like Charlie, are making larger batches of Biltong at one time. Rockey’s New Age 5kg Biltong maker is just ideal for that purpose!

Details on Rockey’s machine can be found by clicking on this link.

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This month’s special offer !

Let’s do it again!

Our special offers last month proved to be very popular so, as promised, we’ll do it again!
From now until the 15th of January 2005 (or until present stocks last) the following pricing will apply:

 

 

BILTONG BUDDY Biltong Maker
R 625.00
R 550.00
ROCKEY’S 5kg Biltong Maker
R 850.00
R 725.00
Wooden Blackwood Biltong Cutter
R 390.00
R 290.00
Semi-Industrial Biltong Shredder (hand model)
R 1495.00
R 890.00
SI-30 – 30kg Drying Cabinet (Semi-Industrial)
R 5995.00
R 4995.00
IDC-120 – 120kg Drying Cabinet (Industrial)
R 17995.00
R 16540.00


And…..all people placing an order for one of our Biltong Makers will receive TWO FREE packets from our Nice ‘n Spicy range.

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Tip of the month

 

Here is a general tip for this month

For those people who are using Rockey’s 5kg Home Biltong Maker the following advice:

Only use a 40 watt pear shaped globe!

Some people have been using a 60 or even a 100 watt globe in the hope that the meat will dry quicker. Not only does it not dry the meat evenly and too quickly but it also causes the driptray to burn and crack.

We spent a lot of time on the design of this Biltong Maker and found that the 40 watt globe dries the meat evenly in 3-5 days.

It is a fallacy that using a higher wattage globe will result in quicker and faster biltong production. Not so!

A higher wattage globe will dry the outside of the meat quicker resulting in a hard crust and wet meat on the inside.

THAT’S NOT BILTONG!

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Questions and Answers

 

This month we are again publishing some of the many requests we receive from our readers all over the world.
If you have an answer for these people please mail them?
 



QUESTION

Dear Biltong Team

I recently bought a biltong maker from you.
My first batch of biltong came out great, it only took 3 days and it was dry and spicy just the way the family likes it!
I on the other hand like it a bit wet but when I try to do that the outside of the meat is dry and the inside still wet.
Please can you tell me how I can do this evenly.

Regards

Mark Khan
countys32@yahoo.co.uk

 



QUESTION

I am thinking of purchasing a biltong maker and spices. Are you aware of whether Australian Customs permits the spices in to Australia.
Have you successfully sent to Perth before?

Linda Hill
lhill@stateone.com.au

ANSWER

The Australian Customs department is very wary of any foodstuffs brought in to Australia. In fact there is very little you can import in the line of food and associated products.

However, our spices are not classified as food and we ship to Australia every single day! That does not mean that there are never any problems. Sometimes a customs official gets suspicious because he/she does not know what it is.
But, after an explanation, they let it go through without a problem.

In the almost 10 year that we have been operating we have had only one case where a customs official insisted on a letter from us stating the content of the spices. After receiving this the spices were released.

 



QUESTION

I am desperately searching for Skaapwors recipes..

We are a couple of guys here in California who have been making our own Boerewors for 3 years or so and would now like to try some skaapwors.

Thanks a lot

Hennie Nel
Hennie.Nel@Metamor.com

(When replying to people asking questions please copy us in on the mail. We could use your advice and recipes to help other people. -Ed)

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Recipe corner


Real South African Christmas Fare!

WHOLE STUFFED TURKEY
WRAPPED IN SALT CRUST DOUGH
AND BAKED IN THE GROUND

Ingredients

 

  • 1 whole turkey
  • 2 oranges, quartered
  • 2 onions, peeled and quartered
  • 2 stalks celery, roughly chopped with leaves
  • 8 cloves garlic
  • 250ml olive oil
  • 3 red chillies
  • 3 green chillies
  • Salt crust dough
  • 3 cups bread flour
  • 3 tsps fine salt
  • 3 litres water


Method

 

  • Stuff the turkey with the oranges, onions, celery, chillies and half the garlic
  • Rub the outer skin with olive oil and the remaining garlic
  • Leave to marinade for 24 hours to let the flavours infuse


To make the dough:

  • Mix the flour and salt together
  • Slowly add the water until its texture resembles that of dough
  • Knead until smooth
  • Cover and leave

When the turkey has marinated overnight, roll out the salt crust dough. Place the turkey on top and fold upwards, making it like a bag.
Squeeze the top together and make sure it is firmly sealed.

To cook:

 

  • Dig a hole in the ground!
  • Line the hole with rocks
  • Place some wood in the hole and allow it to burn to coals
  • Place the wrapped turkey in a baking tray and cover with a sheet of corrugated iron or metal
  • Weigh down with more rocks
  • Cover the sheet with wood and coals and let the turkey cook in the ground for approximately six hours
  • During this time check on the coals to ensure they are still burning throughout
  • After six hours lift the turkey out of the ground. The dough will have hardened
  • Crack it open with a panga or a big knife
  • The turkey will be moist and cooked


Enjoy!!

 


 

Low Cholestrol Christmas Cake

INGREDIENTS

 

  • 1 kg mixed dried fruit
  • 150g glacé apricots, chopped
  • 150g glacé pineapple, chopped
  • 250ml brandy
  • 250ml treacle brown sugar
  • 80ml oil
  • 3 extra large egg whites, lightly beaten
  • 5ml vanilla essence
  • 15ml molasses or golden syrup
  • 15ml orange marmalade
  • 60ml orange juice
  • 15ml finely grated orange rind
  • 500ml cake flour
  • 125ml self raising flour
  • 5ml ground nutmeg
  • 5ml ground cinnamon
  • 5ml ground cloves
  • 5ml mixed spice
  • 60ml brandy for pouring over


METHOD

 

  • Mix the fruit in a large bowl with the brandy, cover and leave overnight, stir occasionally
  • Preheat the oven to 150ºC
  • Grease and line a 20cm square or 23cm round cake pan with grease-proof paper
  • Beat the sugar, oil and egg whites till combined
  • Add the essence, molasses, marmalade, juice and rind and beat until combined
  • Transfer to a large bowl and stir in the fruit and sifted dry ingredients
  • Spoon into the tin, tap on the table to remove any air bubbles, and smooth the surface Bake for 3 to 3 1/2 hours
  • Remove from oven, pour over the brandy and cool in tin before removing the paper

(By kind permission of Pete from Pete’s web site)

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Around the World


From the far Outback
(somewhere near the entrance to the Great Barrier Reef)

By Nico Botha

Hallo readers!

Here in the land very far Down Under, I as the President of the Boerewors Empire, have taken our culture a BIG step forward!

I am now teaching the Aussies the secret of “What is important at a Braai!

Below on the right is a photo of Mick, my butcher mate. He has just completed a course in the Art of Boerewors making!

I used a recipe of a dear good friend which you will find below. Werna is a Jeffriesbay girl and her wors is tops on my list!

Remember our motto

“We have been scattered around the world to teach the less fortunate, the African Culture of Boerewors, to enlighten them on what is important at a Braai!”

Mick, my butcher can be found at Proserpine in Far North Queensland , working at the Meat Guru Butchery near the Metropole Hotel.

 

Mick did two things in my eyes right!

  • He knows when to ask for help to perfect his Boerewors skills, to deliver a better and Superior product.
  • He married a South African doctor at the local Hospital.

BUT…………

  • He cannot fish!
  • He cannot braai on a wood fire!
  • He battles to support the Aussies in the rugby, as his wife tells him who to support!
  • He is also picking up the “taal” from the Albino Tribe from Africa – well done!


Werna van Jefferies baai se wors resep

Nou-ja, hier is die resep vir die wors.

Ek het daar bygesê dat ek nog n botteltjie braaivleis speserye bygooi.

  • 6 Kg. Vleis, in blokke gesny
  • 2 kg Vet, in blokke gesny
  • 3 Eetlepels Sout
  • 3 Eetlepels Koljander
  • 2 Teelepels Peper
  • 1 Teelepel Naeltjies
  • 1 Teelepel Neut
  • 1 Botteltjie Robertsons braai speserye
  • 1 Koppie Bruin Asyn
  • 1 Koppie Yswater
  • 2 Groot Handevol Oats
  • ½ Koppie Worcestersous

METODE

  • Meng vleis en vet en sprei oop op tafel
  • Gooi speserye en Oats oor en meng
  • Meng vloeistowwe, sprinkel oor vleis en meng goed
  • Laat staan vir ½ uur (Of langer)
  • Maal fyn
  • Stop in derms


Here is my suggestion for Christmas lunch!

Skaapkop for the Nation!

Ask your butcher for a whole sheep’s head scraped clean of wool.

At home clean it some more to get rid of all the wool, use hubby’s razor! Scrape the inside of the ears with a sharp knife to clean them properly. Open the mouth and rinse the inside properly, let the water run out the throat.

THE PREPARATION

Fill a bucket full of water and place a handful of salt in, stir to dissolve.
Place the head in the water and ensure that it’s completely covered.
Soak for an hour, then remove from water and rinse.
Dry the head with paper towels (Lots of free towels at the toilets at Heathrow airport)!
Put some salt in the mouth and salt the whole head on the outside as well.
Wrap tin foil around the ears to stop them from burning.
Place the head in the oven in your baking saucepan at 120C.
Leave in the oven for a good few hours, overnight if necessary. A bit of water will ensure that the meat will not dry out.

We know when the head is baked, the eyes must pop out! and hang down, the cheeks must lift up, the tong must hang out of the mouth and the skin must be brown and crispy!

Now, take the head out of the oven and place it on a baking bag.
On the table you must have a large bottle of Mrs. Balls Chutney!
Have a big bowl for all the bones, save the eye balls for last, and feel the excitement when you bite them, and they explode in your mouth!

Pity a sheep has only two eyes!

SHARE IT WITH A LOVED ONE!

Now you have to have someone with whom to share the sheep’s head. It can’t just be anybody, it must be someone that you love, someone who will not freak if the head appears on the table with a mouth full of grinning teeth, because eating a sheep’s head is an intimate affair……

You and your loved one sit down with the head between you.
You have the knife. First you cut off a piece of lip and eat it, then she cuts off another piece and gives it to you.
Then you cut a piece of the cheek off and eat it, then she cuts a piece of cheek off and shares it with you.

The dog gets the nose.

And so you work your way through the whole head.

But it’s when you get to the brain that your love is really tested, because a sheep has a small brain and it has to be shared. It also has only one tongue and that has to be shared as well!

Don’t be sad, this will be a feast to be remembered!

Never, ever prepare a sheep’s head if you are not sure of your love!!

Real African Food!

I know that at the RFU Vrystaat, every year they have a charity banquet and they serve Skaapkop as the main meal!

Cheers Nico



A short story about the developing cricket in Rishon Le-Zion, Israel
By: Yonni Sidelsky

Is that the game that you have to get the ball to go under little bridge thingies?
No, that’s croquet.
Oh, so is that the one on horses?
No, that’s polo.

Oh, so what’s cricket?

Six months ago, if you had to ask me to explain cricket to one more person I would have gone nuts, but now it seems I am paving the way together with a devoted Indian man to establish a cricket club in Rishon Le-Zion and getting local children very interested and, most importantly, involved.

It all started a while ago, when I was told by my grandmother that there is an Indian man that plays cricket with his sons at the parking lot of the supermarket up the street.
So I picked up a practice ball, went over to the parking lot on the weekend when there were no cars, and bowled against the wall.

No one came.

I kept on doing this for a couple of weeks, when on one of the occasions, I took a friend with me. As my friend was bowling to me, I kept on hitting the ball past him, only to have the ball returned all the time by some twelve year old playing soccer at the other end of the parking lot.

It got to the point where I had them standing at long on and long off areas catching the ball!
Needless to say that I eventually got them batting and bowling. The next day (Saturday) I went by myself again but this time in the morning.

To my surprise I saw four people playing cricket there. As I walked up to them with a cricket bat, the even more surprised Roiy (the middle son) came up to me excited. I joined Roiy, his two brothers Idan and Vikki and their father Yossi, in a good old street cricket game, where they were using a half sized bat, an old tennis ball and two old supermarket baskets as wickets.

We changed the ball for my ball, and some of us batted with my bat. We made a habit out of this. Every Saturday at 11am we would meet there to play. We started using a real wicket, which we stuck into some sand in a box, and they made a wicket for the other end.

At the same time, on Fridays, I was getting more and more kids involved showing them the basics and getting the older ones to come on Saturday’s too.

Now we have adults, teenagers and kids playing! We have equipment from India including pads, practice balls, real balls, gloves, more than five bats and even one helmet.

On occasion we use a carpet that we found in the area as a pitch. It was an old carpet obviously thrown away by people who were unaware of the sporting leisure that this matting supplied to a bunch of people on the weekends.

So we play our growing cricket in a parking lot of a supermarket, where the leg-side has a tin wall, a fence front at about the mid-on/mid-off area, and a very long boundary on the off-side.

We work hard on getting more people involved, including an article in the local edition of the Maariv newspaper that will be published on the weekend of the 26th of November.

Cricket may be small in this country, practically non existent in our city, but it is growing, especially in our hearts.

Please join us in our games, to watch, play, umpire and support.

Contact Yonni Sidelsky at jonty@012.net.il

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Smile a While


A true story

The medal winning Olympic runner, Picabo (pronounced Peek-A-Boo), is not just an athlete, she is a nurse.

She currently works in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of large South African metropolitan hospital.

She is not permitted to answer the telephone while she is at work. It simply caused too much confusion when she would answer the phone and say: “Picabo, ICU”

(A good clean story is hard to find these days! – Ed)

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SportTalk


Rugby
National rugby coaching body to be formed
November 30 2004

Twenty coaching managers from all 14 SA Rugby Provinces will convene for a two-day workshop in Cape Town starting on Wednesday to discuss ways to improve coaching skills at various levels around the country.

Under the auspices of the National Coaching Co-ordinators Forum, the representatives will discuss ways to incorporate coaches’ training into the Outcome Based Education system, registration of rugby coaches, course content and recognition of prior learning, among other topics.

SA Rugby Manager for Coaching, Hilton Adonis, says the meeting is a follow-up to previous discussions, and is geared towards meeting the challenges of the future.

“The professionalisation and promotion of the coach is critical to the successful development of the game of rugby,” says Adonis. “In the highly competitive and demanding world of international sport, we need to explore all possible means to keep abreast with latest techniques and developments. These challenges could best be addressed through a co-ordinated national coaching structure.”

 

‘We need to explore all possible means to keep abreast with latest techniques’ Coaches education in South Africa is moving towards alignment with the government’s requirements for training. At previous meetings, government officials in the labour department had been invited to give presentations, with a view to accrediting coaches.


The following coaching managers have been invited:

Johan Schoeman (Blue Bulls), Alridge Mercuur (Boland), Dumisani Mhani (Border),Denver Wannies (Eastern Province), Mark Donato (Falcons), Derrick Sampson (Falcons), Selvyn Colby (Free State) Dick Jansen (Free State), Wimpie Vermeulen (Golden Lions), Deon Swanepoel (Griffons), Michael Herbert (Griffons), Marius Johnson (Griqualand West), Eugene Hare (Leopards), Gerald McPherson (Leopards), Chris Buitendach (Mpumalanga), Garth Giles (KwaZulu-Natal), Colin Heard (Kwa-Zulu Natal), Willie Beukes (South Western Districts), Geoff Crowster (Western Province) and Hilton Adonis (SA Rugby). – Sapa

 



-Where can you watch rugby on TV?-
Click here to find out where in most countries!

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The Competition


The winner of the November Competition

The winner of the November competition is Hannah Solomons from Tel Aviv!

Congratulations Hannah, your Biltong Cutter is on its way to you!!

 



Remember the following:

 

  • The monthly draw or competition is totally free to everyone.
  • You can enter as many times as you like.
  • You can only enter via the Competition link on our home page or by clicking here
  • All prizes are sent to the winners free of charge.

 

The prizes for the December

That’s correct!
You read it right!
There is more than one prize this month. In fact there are three prizes!

The winners for the competition for December 2004 will receive their prizes as follows:

 

  • The first correct entry drawn gets the Biltong Buddy
  • The second correct entry drawn gets the barbecue tool kit and
  • The third correct entry drawn receives the Biltong cutter.

Just click here to see what the prizes look like!

Or go straight to our competition page!

To enter the competition all you have to do is to visit our home page at and click on one of the two competition links.

The winners of all competitions are notified by email.

Some of the prizes for next year

 

  • Biltongmakers
  • Biltong spices
  • Boerewors spices
  • Braai tool sets
  • Potjie Pots
  • Barbecues
  • Cadac Skottel Braais and………. much, much more!!!

 

So, don’t wait!

You can enter right now by clicking on the competition link on our home page.

 

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A free Biltong Maker!


It’s easy to earn a free Biltong Maker!

As a South African orientated web site we are constantly looking to contact more and more South Africans across the world.
Not only to tell them about how they can make their own Biltong but also to give them a chance to share their stories with other South Africans the world over.

So, here is your chance to help us.

If you know about a South African family or friend living near you or perhaps somewhere far away, why not tell them about us and then us about them.
Perhaps you can send us their email address so that we can mail them a copy of this newsletter.
If they like it they can stay on the mailing list, if not they can just let us know and we will remove them.

If the response we receive is large enough and, directly due to your efforts people place orders with us, you could be rewarded by receiving one of our products totally free of charge.

What an easy way to perhaps get your own Home Biltong Maker without having to pay a cent for it!

You can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com

During August many people went to the trouble once again of submitting their friend’s and family’s names and we would like to thank all!

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Let’s hear from you!


Help us to make it even better!

Many people are subscribing to this newsletter every day. Mostly they do so because they enjoy reading it and like to hear from people in other parts of the world.

If you are one of our subscribers why don’t you write something yourself?

Just like you enjoy reading about what other people are up to, they might enjoy reading about you and your family.
Why not put pen to paper (or fingers to the keyboard!), and tell us about anything interesting. About life in your part of the world, what you do and how you live. Perhaps something that happened to you.
You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask.

Perhaps you have some advice to give?
You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Of course it does not have to be about Biltong or food. Anything that is of interest is welcome!
Share it with other people around the world!

It would be so nice to hear from you!

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Boerewors in the Benelux


The last Boerewors for 2004

So, the last batch of 120kg of Boerewors has been made. Some 70kg of that went to Pat in Luxembourg for the yearly bazaar there. The rest we will keep in our freezers for those people who are planning a braai in the snow!

Or perhaps you are planning a get-together watching rugby or cricket. Nothing better than watching a game with a beer in one hand and a boerie roll in the other!

Click to me me biggerBoerewors keeps very well for a couple of months provided it is wrapped/packed well and kept frozen at around -20 Celcius. (More than -18C).

The price is € 8.50 per kilogram for the smaller quantities under 50kg. Over 50kg it is € 7.00 when you come and fetch in Keerbergen and € 7.50 if we deliver to you. (Benelux only)

Please keep in mind that we also do Boerewors rolls and Potjiekos for up to 100 people as well as “Lamb-on-the-Spit” for functions. So if you are planning anything please let us know?

Interested parties can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com for details or phone us at +32 (16) 53.96.25.

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Potjie Pots in the Benelux

Click to me me bigger

There are now no more Potjies left. The last one went to Elke Knobling from Miltenberg in Germany.
Sorry people. You’ll have to wait till next year.
However, if you want to borrow a Potjie please give us a call. We will always help those in need!

If you are thinking of buying a Potjie next year why not pre-order one now. That way you can make sure that you’ll have it in time for next summer!

For those who are interested please call us at +32 (16) 53.96.25

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Previous issues of this Newsletter

 

You can click on the links below to view some of the previous issues of our newsletter.

 

 

December 2003
Jan/Feb 2004
March 2004
April 2004
May 2004
June 2004
July 2004
August 2004
September 2004
October 2004
November 2004
December 2004


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Subscribing and unsubscribing

 

Perhaps you would like to subscribe to this newsletter or tell a friend about Biltongmakers.Com! and the incredible Biltong Makers!!
You can be included in this newsletter by clicking on the following link.
Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

If you prefer not to receive email from us, you can unsubscribe from Biltongmakers.Com! by clicking on this link.
Unsubscribe me please.

November 2004

The Newsletter
November 2004

You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
If you do not wish to receive this newsletter you may unsubscribe at the bottom where you will find an automatic email link. Just click on that and send. Your name will then be permanently deleted from our database.
If you, your family or your friends want to subscribe to the newsletter please click on this link. Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

In this Newsletter

Just click on any of the subjects to jump straight to it

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From the editor

Keerbergen
Belgium
November 2, 2004

Hello everyone!

It is still pitch dark outside as I sit here putting the final touches on the newsletter for this month.

It is just after 6 o’clock in the morning and June left for work in Brussels a little while ago.

Outside it has been raining all night and it seems that we had a lot of wind as well. All the hard work I did last week with clearing the autumn leaves was undone last night. I guess I have to get in there with the leaf blower again this coming weekend.

But, we like it!
The central heating has been on for a while now so it is nice and warm inside. Let it blow out there we say. It’s lovely to look from the inside out!

And so November is on our doorstep and with it the start of winter. We haven’t had much of that yet this year. The temperatures have been very mild. Mild enough to still work in the garden in a T-Shirt and shorts!

But, it won’t last, that I can assure you!

Both June and I are looking forward to the winter. We like the snow and the cold weather as most of our regular readers will know by now.

For the southern part of our world summer is on its way. From what we hear from around those parts of the world it has been pretty warm already! Good luck to all of you there. You deserve it after the past winter!

Well, I am not going to keep you long. There are a lot of contributions this month so let’s get going!

Just one last thing; why don’t we make it a bumper issue next month with even more contributions from everybody?
It does not take much to put pen to paper (or the fingers to the keyboard). Anything will do. I am sure that everyone will enjoy it.

Keep well and we’ll speak again next month!

Lo

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Making you think

Patience

    • Patience is the greatest of all virtues.

Cato the Elder (234 BC – 149 BC)

    • A handful of patience is worth more than a bushel of brains.

Dutch Proverb

    • Our patience will achieve more than our force.

Edmund Burke (1729 – 1797)

    • It is very strange that the years teach us patience – that the shorter our time, the greater our capacity for waiting.

Elizabeth Taylor (1932 – )

    • There art two cardinal sins from which all others spring: Impatience and Laziness.

Franz Kafka (1883 – 1924)

    • Patience has its limits. Take it too far, and it’s cowardice.

George Jackson (1941 – 1971)

    • If I have ever made any valuable discoveries, it has been owing more to patient attention, than to any other talent.

Isaac Newton (1642 – 1727)

    • Patience serves as a protection against wrongs as clothes do against cold. For if you put on more clothes as the cold increases, it will have no power to hurt you. So in like manner you must grow in patience when you meet with great wrongs, and they will then be powerless to vex your mind.

Leonardo da Vinci (1452 – 1519)

    • I am extraordinarily patient, provided I get my own way in the end.

Margaret Thatcher (1925 – )

    • There will be a time when loud-mouthed, incompetent people seem to be getting the best of you. When that happens, you only have to be patient and wait for them to self destruct. It never fails.

Richard Rybolt

    • Patience is the companion of wisdom.

Saint Augustine (354 AD – 430 AD)

    • Have patience with all things, but chiefly have patience with yourself. Do not lose courage in considering you own imperfections but instantly set about remedying them – every day begin the task anew.

Saint Francis de Sales

    • You must first have a lot of patience to learn to have patience.

Stanislaw J. Lec (1909 – 1966)

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Topic of the month

Eat drink and be merry!


Remember all the stories about Good Food and the nasty types that make you fat, the amount of red wine you drink and the kaygee (kg) lekker sagte biltong?
Well read this, kick the diets under the butt and have a 2kg lekker nat en vet biltong and celebrate!
Here is the reason why diets don’t work!

Diets

For those of you who watch what you eat, here’s the final word on nutrition and health. It’s a relief to know the truth after all those conflicting medical studies.

 

    • The Japanese eat very little fat and suffer fewer heart attacks than the Americans, Australians, British, or Canadians.
    • The Mexicans eat a lot of fat and also suffer fewer heart attacks than the Americans, Australians, British, or Canadians.
    • The Japanese drink very little red wine and suffer fewer heart attacks than the Americans, Australians, British, or Canadians.
    • The Italians drink large amounts of red wine and also suffer fewer

heart attacks than the Americans, Australians, British, or Canadians.

  • The Germans drink a lot of beer and eat lots of sausages and fats and suffer fewer heart attacks than the Americans, Australians, British, or Canadians.
  • Ukrainians drink a lot of vodka, eat a lot of perogies, cabbage rolls and suffer fewer heart attacks than the Americans, Australians, British, or Canadians.

CONCLUSION:
Eat and drink what you like!

 



But now let’s get serious….

Why diets don’t work
By Deanne Jade, Principal of the National Centre of Eating Disorders

A visitor from a far-off planet observing the way we behave could easily assume that dieting is a very good idea indeed.
We do it all the time.

In fact, dieting is so popular that in the past 10 years it’s estimated that around 70 per cent of the adult female population and 30 per cent of of all adult males (in developed countries) have been on one.
It doesn’t seem to matter whether it’s the F-Plan diet, the Pineapple diet, liquid diets or the Drinking Man’s diet, people will try almost anything in their frantic desire to shed a few pounds. Unfortunately, the results are usually the same.

Although diets do produce results in the short term, very few dieters maintain their weight loss, no matter which diet they try. Even worse than this, most dieters end up bigger than they were before they started dieting.

So, why don’t diets work?

Diets are hard to do

Most diets involve a significant change in a person’s normal eating habits over an extended period of time.
But habits die hard; we cling to them because they fit in with our lifestyle and the people around us. And changing something that is second nature to us very often results in stress – especially if that change is at odds with the habits of those in our social and family world.

Dieting is also hard because it relies on our willpower to keep us on the right track. Willpower is often very strong at the start of a diet when we are desperate to change, but it can ebb and flow with the state of our health and the pressures and triggers of day-to-day life.

Dieters rarely think of rehearsing how they will manage in difficult situations such as going out to dinner with friends; they just hope that their willpower will hold up and they punish themselves if it doesn’t.

Willpower is hard to maintain for extended periods of time, especially if our dietary rules are too strict. Sometimes we feel like we’ve made some progress in our diet and so we become less inclined to put ourselves through the struggle of restricting our food. So dieting is hard because people haven’t learned the difference between willpower and commitment to long-term behaviour change.

Diets make you feel hungry and deprived

Research shows that, whether you are fat or thin, diets make you very hungry and create powerful cravings for the very foods that dieters try to stay away from – such as sugars and fats.
On top of these cravings, dieters also have to manage feelings of deprivation: ‘Everybody is eating what I’m not allowed to. They can have it – why cant I?’ This kind of thinking is likely to lead to rebellious overeating.

Dieters lapse and collapse

A diet only works for as long as you are on it.
Most people get bored with rigid eating plans and go off the rails from time to time. The trouble is that for many people a lapse is a sign of failure. They tell themselves they’ve ‘blown it’ and experience feelings of inadequacy; the lapse becomes a slippery slope and they end up eating anything that’s not nailed to the floorboards in the hope that they will ‘start again tomorrow’.

Such people go from diet to diet hoping to find the one that will stop them from failing, but such a diet doesn’t exist, and they may end up bigger than ever each time they try.

Diets fail to address the emotional aspect of overeating

People very often eat to help deal with emotional problems such as stress, rather than because they’re hungry. This is normal, but some people gain weight because they turn to food for emotional comfort or to cope with negative feelings like anger or loss. Dieting doesn’t solve the problem of ’emotional’ eating. If anything, it makes people more depressed – and losing weight will often make things worse, as people have to cope with the pressures and expectations that their new body shape can entail.

Dieters usually fail to change their core habits

The only people who lose weight and keep it off permanently are those who have made permanent changes to their own eating and exercise habits, and to those of their families.

Dieters too often say or think things like: ‘When I’m slim I’ll never overeat again’ or ‘When I’ve lost this weight I’ll go out and celebrate with a cream cake’, or ‘Why should I change the family eating habits just because I’m on a diet?’
Too often those old eating habits will creep back in, no matter how much weight the dieter has lost, and in time they’ll find themselves back at square one.

Conclusion

Wanting to be a healthy weight and to manage one’s eating in a world full of temptations is a laudable aim. However, dieting as we know it is not the way to do it.

For long-term weight loss, many things – not just your nutritional habits – will have to change.

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Our Home Biltong Makers


I thought I had died and gone to heaven!

Newcastle upon Tyne
United Kingdom
October 14, 2004

Yesterday afternoon, after three days, I tested my first batch of Biltong.
Brilliant!!
A little bit salty but the texture was just how I like it.
Not too dry.
My girlfriend had never tasted biltong but she’d listened to me raving on about it for years. She was most impressed! I bought a machine for my son as well and am just waiting to hear how his first batch is going.
This is the first time I’ve had biltong since 1986 so you can imagine how pleased I am!
Thought I’d died and gone to heaven!!

Best regards to all the Biltong Team.

John Renwick

 


 

It is good to see that so many people (like John) are enjoying the pleasure of making their own Biltong. We always look forward to hearing from people how they experiment and what the results are!

Now for a bit of sad news.

Since the materials our Biltong makers are made of a Polymer which is a byproduct of oil, we have been told by our factories that their prices to us have been increased with immediate effect! They tell us that there is a world-wide shortage of PST (a polymer) and that their raw product price has increased by 31% over the past year.

The increases to us have been around 12% and we have absorbed part of that. From this moment the normal retail price of the RNA-5kg drying cabinet will be R 850.00 (instead of R 825.00) and that of the Biltong Buddy R 625.00 (instead of R 590.00).

However, since we still have quite a bit of stock at the old price we will be able to keep the price for the RNA-5kg machine at R 725.00 and that of the Biltong Buddy at R 550.00.
This will be until the middle of January or as long as the present stocks lasts only!

It might be a good idea to make use of this opportunity especially with Christmas around the corner. There is not very much time left so if you want to give it as a present place your order soon!



You can order the new BILTONG BUDDY now by going to our order page or you can have a look at it first by clicking on this link.

With ROCKEY’S NEW AGE 5kg Biltong maker you can make enough Biltong to last you over the Christmas period!

Details on Rockey’s machine can be found by clicking on this link.

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This month’s special offers !


It’s almost Christmas so let’s have some fun again!

We have had so many specials during the year. The price has yoyoed up and down so much trying to please everybody that we almost decided not to have anything for Christmas especially with the price increase! But, that would not be very nice of us now, would it?

Despite it being the festive season we have also had so many requests from so many people to try and have some kind of special pricing or “give-aways” this season that we just could not say no!

From now until the 15th of January 2005 (or until present stocks last) the following pricing will apply:

 

 

BILTONG BUDDY Biltong Maker
R 625.00
R 550.00
ROCKEY’S 5kg Biltong Maker
R 850.00
R 725.00
Wooden Blackwood Biltong Cutter
R 390.00
R 290.00
Semi-Industrial Biltong Shredder (hand model)
R 1495.00
R 890.00
SI-30 – 30kg Drying Cabinet (Semi-Industrial)
R 5995.00
R 4995.00
IDC-120 – 120kg Drying Cabinet (Industrial)
R 17995.00
R 16540.00


And…..all people placing an order for one of our Biltong Makers will receive TWO FREE packets from our Nice ‘n Spicy range.

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Tip of the month

 

What vinegar to use?

Last month the question of vinegar came up again. It is so often that people cannot find brown vinegar and then do not know what to do. All kinds of vinegars are then used with some very mixed results.

Below Craig Rudolph form Australia gives us the answer to this problem.

Craig writes:

I was reading through the question with regards “Brown Vinegar” in the September newsletter and am happy to provide the following information:

I worked for many years for a very large Vinegar manufacturer in South Africa. So I can speak with some knowledge on the product and what people should know.

As some people might know, vinegar is made via a double fermentation process.

Firstly the raw material (grapes, malt, apples or molasses) is fermented and then distilled into a 95% alcohol.
(Normal drinking alcohol quality)
This alcohol is then fermented for a second time with a small bacteria called “Aceto-bacter.” This little bacteria spends the whole of its life eating alcohol molecules, with the help of nutrients, and turning the alcohol into acetic acid or vinegar.

The colour that various vinegars have is purely to do with where they are stored or what is added after their production. So malt vinegars could be stored in barrels etc. Wine vinegars with a red tinge will have been coloured with red grape skins for a short period. For most commercial brown vinegars, off the supermarket shelves, it is purely a small amount of caramel that is added. Depending on how dark they want it, depends on how much they add of the caramel.

Strength of vinegar can also increase with age. Balsamic vinegars can be as old as 200 years – not unlike good red wines. So for the person that used cider vinegar, I would suggest using a normal supermarket shelf white vinegar, which might be a little more subtle than the cider vinegar, and then obtain a small amount of caramel for adding and make their own brown vinegar.

Hope this is of help to the folks around the Biltong globe.

Regards

Craig Rudolph

 


 

We also received a mail from Leon Oelofse who lives in Spain.

Leon writes:

I live in Spain and make biltong, boerewors, drywors and chutney for the South Africans on the Costa del Sol.

In the October newsletter a subscriber, Juan-Marco from Canada had a question about brown vinegar.

I only use apple cider vinegar which is always a white wine colour in this country and works very well. When Juan-Marco stated that the biltong smelled too strong of vinegar, was that during the process of spicing or after the drying period?

There are a number of ways to make biltong and perhaps if he tells us which method he is using , one could narrow down the problem.

Regards,

Leon Oelofse

(Thank you both very much for your input. There you have it then Juan-Marco, just let us know what exactly happened and Leon will probably have the answer for you – Ed)

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Questions and Answers

 

This month we are again publishing some of the many requests we receive from our readers all over the world.
If you have an answer for these people please mail them?
 



QUESTION

Hi there

Any ideas why Chilli Biltong gathers mould after packaging? This does not happen to the plain Kalahari biltong.

Many thanks for all your help.

Fay Fayruz
South Africa
fmajiet@oldmutual.com

 


 

QUESTION

Hi there Biltong Team!

I am hoping you can help!
Is it safe to eat biltong when pregnant? I hope so as I have huge craving for it!

Thanks

Helen Blakebrough
England
hblakebrough@nsresearch-uk.com

 


 

QUESTION

Hi

We have a biltong maker and I was thinking of trying to make dried fruit in it.
Do you have any recipes?

Thanks

Melanie Sarachik

 



Does anyone use their Biltong maker for purposes other than drying meat? – Ed

 


 

QUESTION

Hi, jammer om te pla maar ek wonder of julle my nie kan help met ‘n Koedoe potjie resep nie asseblief!

Ek het nou al oral gesoek maar kan niks kry wat vir my ordentlik lyk nie.

Julia van der Merwe
Juliav@sage.co.za

 



Anyone? – Ed

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Recipe corner


Here are two very traditional South Africa recipes – Enjoy!

Vetkoek

This is a traditional Afrikaans recipe.
Vetkoeken are delicious when cut open, buttered, and then filled with either cooked mince (savory), or spread with syrup (sweet).

Ingredients

  • 1 cup cake flour
  • 3ml salt
  • 5ml Baking powder
  • 1 egg
  • Milk
  • Oil (for deep frying)

Method

  • Sift the dry ingredients into a bowl
  • Beat the egg lightly in a cup and add to the dry ingredients
  • Add sufficient milk and beat till a smooth batter
  • Heat the oil in a pan, and drop large spoonfuls of the batter into the hot oil (be careful)
  • Fry, turning them over now and then until golden brown
  • Cut open, butter, and fill. (Experiment with any other filling!)

 

Rusks (Beskuit) – dunk in your coffee…..

Ingredients

  • 2 cups unbleached white flour
  • 2 cups whole wheat bread flour (coarsely ground if possible)
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • ½ cup melted butter
  • 2 eggs
  • ¾ cup buttermilk
  • 2 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 2 tsp pure almond extract

Method

  • Pre-heat oven to 200 degrees centigrade (400F or gasmark 6)
  • Thoroughly mix the dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl
  • Combine all the wet ingredients, pour them into the dry ingredients and stir until you have a soft dough, similar to biscuit dough.
  • Turn the dough onto a well-floured surface and roll or pat it to about a 1-2 cm thickness.
  • Cut the dough into rectangles about 5×10 cm
  • Bake the rusks about 5 cm apart on buttered baking sheet for about 25 minutes until the tops are crisping and browning a little
  • Now, eat a few “soft” rusks warm from the oven!
  • Loosely pile the rusks on a baking sheet and keep them in a 100 degree centigrade (250F or gasmark 1) oven all day or all night (about 12 hours) to dry
  • The finished rusks should be very dry and hard
  • Cool and store in an airtight container
  • Rusks will keep for weeks.

(With kind permission from Pete’s web site)

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Around the World


From the far Outback
(somewhere near the entrance to the Great Barrier Reef)

Hello readers!

The month of October arrived and departed here in Far North Queensland with little excitement! I made my last batch of Biltong for the year as the heat and humidity is here!

Dis sommer heerlik warm!

I received a large envelope from Perth the other day with some droëwors and biltong in it! The droëwors went down like a bom and the biltong disappeared late at night as I watched a movie or two!
Thanks to Wayne, an Aussie, who tasted his biltong and boerewors in London many years ago!

I mailed some biltong to a South African who has been living near Darwin a while ago. She told me biltong was just a memory from her youth days in South Africa! I could not resist the temptation to vacuum pack a few stukke and drop it in the mail to her!
She lives away from any civilisation and Darwin. Her mail goes to a roadside shop were she collects it!
It makes me feel good to know that irrespective of who we are, or were we live we will as a nation still help fellow South Africans.
She’s been in Australia for 33 years!!

Here on the “home front” all things are OK. Skippy is smiling from ear to ear, as I received my letter from the Australian Department of Immigration and Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs, to inform me my citizenship has been approved! Now I have to do the pledge, and then be a “Fair Dinked Aussie”!!

Ja-nee ou maat a Botha as an Aussie!

It brought a few deep thoughts on my childhood in the Eastern Cape, my family and my life in South Africa, my children and now a new country!

I will always remember those things that made an everlasting impact on my life and the goodbye to my brothers and my mates the day I boarded the plane to Australia.
Although I had been to Australia many times before, it was sad to say goodbye. But the excitement of a new country made it all worthwhile!

But I promised my family I will be a Bok supporter till the end of time!

Well I am over the Kapater episode, the normal colorings is back to African Albino en nie Alan Hendrikse en sy various shades of District 6 nie!!
The doctor that did the damage read the article on the web, and is still laughing when he sees me thinking of the flexi pipe that has been removed!

My mate Mick, the butcher, tells me that the Boerewors has taken Proserpine BBQ’s by storm and he even gets more orders from Aussies than from the South Africans living here in the region!
That makes me worry as to what next the Aussies will enjoy from our tables!

Time to say cheers, and keep chewing on the biltong!

Nico
mamela@hotkey.net.au


 

A South African restaurant in Calcary, Canada

Dear Biltongmakers Team,

My cousins have a wonderful South African Restaurant in Calgary Canada. I have written to them recommending your Newsletter, and they would probably be very interested in a Biltongmaker.

Here is their Website. I am sure some readers of this newsletter will be interested to have this information.
They are looking at expanding a very successful business via franchising to the rest of Canada.

Just click on Jabulani Restaurant to see what they are all about.

Best regards from Germany,

Konstanze-Marié Ahlers
(Anyone involved in something typically South African is quite welcome to mail us – Ed)

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Smile a While


History

Some of you may have seen this one before but here it is again anyway!

It’s good!

History…
Some useless but true facts about England in the 1500’s

 

    • Most people got married in June because they took their yearly bath in May and still smelled pretty good by June. However, they were starting to smell, so brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor.

 

    • Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water. The man of the house had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the other sons and men, then the women and finally the children — last of all the babies. By then the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone in it hence the saying, “Don’t throw the baby out with the bath water.”

 

    • Houses had thatched roofs — thick straw, piled high, with no wood underneath. It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the dogs, cats and other small animals (mice rats, and bugs) lived in the roof. When it rained it became slippery, and sometimes the animals would slip and fall off the roof; hence the saying, “It’s raining cats and dogs.”

 

    • There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house. This posed a real problem in the bedroom where bugs and other droppings could really mess up your nice clean bed. Hence, a bed with big posts and a sheet hung over the top afforded some protection. That’s how canopy beds came into existence.

 

    • The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt, hence the saying “dirt poor.” The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery in the winter when wet, so they spread thresh – the straw left over after threshing grain – on the floor to help keep their footing. As the winter wore on, they kept adding more and more thresh until when you opened the door it would all start slipping outside. To prevent this, a piece of wood was placed in the entranceway hence, a “thresh hold.”

 

    • They cooked in the kitchen with a big kettle that always hung over the fire. Every day they lit the fire and added things to the pot. They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat. They would eat the stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to get cold overnight and then start over the next day. Sometimes the stew had food in it that had been there for quite a while, — hence the rhyme, “peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot nine days old.”

 

    • Sometimes they could obtain pork, which made them feel quite special. When visitors came over, they would hang up their bacon to show off. It was a sign of wealth that a man “could bring home the bacon.” They would cut off a little to share with guests and would all sit around and “chew the fat.”

 

    • Those with money had plates made of pewter. Food with a high acid content caused some of the lead to leach onto the food, causing lead poisoning and death. This happened most often with tomatoes, so for the next 400 years or so, tomatoes were considered poisonous.

 

    • Most people did not have pewter plates, but had trenchers – a piece of wood with the middle scooped out like a bowl. Often trenchers were made from stale pays and bread which was so old and hard that they could use them for quite some time. Trenchers were never washed and a lot of times worms and mold got into the wood and old bread. After eating off wormy, moldy trenchers, one would get “trench mouth.”

 

    • Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burnt bottom of the loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, the “upper crust.”

 

    • Lead cups were used to drink ale or whiskey. The combination would sometimes knock them out for a couple of days. Someone walking along the road would take them for dead and prepare them for burial. They were laid out on the kitchen table for a couple of days and the family would gather around and eat and drink and wait and see if they would wake up — hence, the custom of holding a “wake.”

 

  • England is old and small and they started running out of places to bury people. So they would dig up coffins and would take the bones to a “bone-house” and reuse the grave. When reopening these coffins, one out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realized they had been burying people alive. So they thought they would tie a string on the wrist of the corpse, lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night (the “graveyard shift”) to listen for the bell; thus, someone could be “saved by the bell” or was considered a “dead ringer.”

And that’s the truth.

Who said that History was boring?

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SportTalk


Rugby players of the year awards (By Jacques van der Westhuyzen, November 02, 2004)

They seem to be getting younger and younger. Schalk Burger, at the tender age of 21, is South Africa’s Rugby Player of the Year for 2004.

The Western Province and Springbok flanker follows in the footsteps of Joe van Niekerk (2002) and Ashwin Willemse (2003), who both won their awards at the age of 22.

Burger, a surprise inclusion in Rudolf Straeuli’s World Cup squad last year, has quickly evolved into one of the most feared and respected open side flankers in the game. He has to date earned 11 Test caps.

 

The Try of the Year award went to Victor Matfield The blond-haired loose forward beat fellow Boks De Wet Barry, Bakkies Botha, Os du Randt and Marius Joubert for the biggest prize in South African rugby at the annual awards banquet in Sandton last night.


Veteran prop forward Du Randt, who made a triumphant return to Test rugby this year, was, not surprisingly, chosen as the Players’ Player of the Year.

The Most Promising Player Award was won by Lions centre Bryan Habana, who’ll be donning the Blue Bulls jersey next season.

Barry won the award for Super 12 Player of the Tournament, while Ettienne Botha was named as Currie Cup Player of the Year. Veteran winger John Daniels was voted the Vodacom Cup Player of the Year.

The Try of the Year award went to Victor Matfield for his try against Australia in the Tri-Nations Test in Durban.

Other award winners included: Kabamba Floors (Sevens), Derick Hougaard (Under-21s), Heinke van der Merwe (Under-19s), Nelis Nel (Club Champs), Luvuyo Mhlobiso (Coca-Cola), Ronwin Kelly (Women’s Achievement) and Jenny Bentel (Refereeing Achievement).

Springbok fullback Percy Montgomery, for becoming the highest points scorer in Springbok history, and referee André Watson, for his contribution to rugby, were among the recipients of Special Awards.

Honorary Life Member Awards were presented to former Sarfu presidents Ebrahim Patel, Fritz Eloff, Louis Luyt and Silas Nkanunu.

(This article was originally published on page 20 of The Star on November 02, 2004)

 



-Where can you watch rugby on TV?-
Click here to find out where in most countries!

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The Competition


The winner of the October Competition

The winner of the October competition is Marion van Agt from Singapore!

We have never had a winner from that part of the world!

Congratulations Marion!
Your Biltong Buddy is winging its way to you as we are typing this.
You will find lots of Biltong recipes on the web site. If you need any more just drop us an email please?

 



Remember the following:

 

  • The monthly draw or competition is totally free to everyone.
  • You can enter as many times as you like.
  • You can only enter via the Competition link on our home page or by clicking here
  • All prizes are sent to the winners free of charge.

 

The prize for the November

The winner for the competition for November 2004 will receive one of our hand-made blackwood Biltong Cutters!

Click here to see a picture of it on the competition page!

To enter the competition all you have to do is to visit our home page at www.biltongmakers.com and click on one of the two competition links.

The winners of all competitions are notified by email.

Some of the other prizes for the year

 

  • Biltongmakers
  • Biltong spices
  • Boerewors spices
  • Braai tool sets
  • Potjie Pots
  • Barbecues
  • Cadac Skottel Braais and………. much, much more!!!

 

So, don’t wait!

You can enter right now by clicking on the competition link on our home page.

 

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A free Biltong Maker!


It’s easy to earn a free Biltong Maker!

As a South African orientated web site we are constantly looking to contact more and more South Africans across the world.
Not only to tell them about how they can make their own Biltong but also to give them a chance to share their stories with other South Africans the world over.

So, here is your chance to help us.

If you know about a South African family or friend living near you or perhaps somewhere far away, why not tell them about us and then us about them.
Perhaps you can send us their email address so that we can mail them a copy of this newsletter.
If they like it they can stay on the mailing list, if not they can just let us know and we will remove them.

If the response we receive is large enough and, directly due to your efforts people place orders with us, you could be rewarded by receiving one of our products totally free of charge.

What an easy way to perhaps get your own Home Biltong Maker without having to pay a cent for it!

You can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com

During August many people went to the trouble once again of submitting their friend’s and family’s names and we would like to thank all!

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Let’s hear from you!


Help us to make it even better!

Many people are subscribing to this newsletter every day. Mostly they do so because they enjoy reading it and like to hear from people in other parts of the world.

If you are one of our subscribers why don’t you write something yourself?

Just like you enjoy reading about what other people are up to, they might enjoy reading about you and your family.
Why not put pen to paper (or fingers to the keyboard!), and tell us about anything interesting. About life in your part of the world, what you do and how you live. Perhaps something that happened to you.
You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask.

Perhaps you have some advice to give?
You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Of course it does not have to be about Biltong or food. Anything that is of interest is welcome!
Share it with other people around the world!

It would be so nice to hear from you!

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Boerewors in the Benelux


The last of the Boerewors for this year.

Click to me me biggerDuring November we will be making the last lot of Boerewors for the season. So this is the time to stock up for the winter!
Boerewors keeps very well for a couple of months provided it is wrapped/packed well and kept frozen at around -20 Celcius. (More than -18C).

The price is € 8.50 per kilogram for the smaller quantities under 50kg. Over 50kg it is € 7.00 when you come and fetch in Keerbergen and € 7.50 if we deliver to you. (Benelux only)

We can be contacted by mail at boeries@biltongmakers.be or by telephone at +32 (16) 53.96.25.

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Potjie Pots in the Benelux


Click to me me biggerWe have one size 4 Potjie Pot left.
For those who are interested please call us at +32 (16) 53.96.25.
Please remember that we are not a shop. We are normal working people who, in the course of running our web site also help South Africa ex-patriots and others to get hold of some very special South African goodies.
We cannot deliver unless we happen to be in the area.
If you really want it badly please call and arrange for collection.

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Previous issues of this Newsletter

 

You can click on the links below to view some of the previous issues of our newsletter.

 

 

December 2003
Jan/Feb 2004
March 2004
April 2004
May 2004
June 2004
July 2004
August 2004
September 2004
October 2004
November 2004
December 2004


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Subscribing and unsubscribing

 

Perhaps you would like to subscribe to this newsletter or tell a friend about Biltongmakers.Com! and the incredible Biltong Makers!!
You can be included in this newsletter by clicking on the following link.
Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

If you prefer not to receive email from us, you can unsubscribe from Biltongmakers.Com! by clicking on this link.
Unsubscribe me please.

 


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Please report any mistakes in this newsletter to the webmaster
 

October 2004

The Newsletter
October 2004

You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
If you do not wish to receive this newsletter you may unsubscribe at the bottom where you will find an automatic email link. Just click on that and send. Your name will then be permanently deleted from our database.
If you, your family or your friends want to subscribe to the newsletter please click on this link. Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

In this Newsletter

Just click on any of the subjects to jump straight to it

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From the editor

Keerbergen
Belgium
October 1, 2004

Have you ever been to Spain and not knowing one word of Spanish?
Have you ever hunted for the three restaurants they mention on your reservation slip with the names Desayuno, Almuerzo and Cena only to find out (after searching for them for an hour) that these are not restaurant names but that they mean breakfast, lunch and dinner in Spanish?

Well, that was the start of our holiday last month. We had some good laughs!

I have been to most countries in Europe at some stage in my life but I had never been to Spain.
That is where we ended up on holiday in the end. It would have been fun to go to Croatia but it did not work out in the end and we decided to leave it for another time.

 

The first thing we noticed when we landed in Alacanti and were taken by bus to our hotel is how dry it was. It reminded us very much of South Africa during a dry spell.
So, there we were on our first holiday since we went to Mauritius in 1996.
Since it was a last minute decision to go to Spain there was not very much choice as where to go so we ended up in Benidorm, just north of Alacanti.

Some of you might remember Benidorm as the place where Delboy and Rodney used to go to! Remember them? Well, I can tell you one thing. There were loads of Delboys there!

 

We stayed in the Melia Hotel which is a four star hotel and it looked great (see above!) But, service and food wise it did not compare to some of the South African four and five star hotels we were used to. However, the swimming pool (see right, taken from our 23rd floor balcony) and the setting was incredible! We needed a good rest, lying by the pool, just doing nothing and that is exactly what we got!


One of the first things we noticed was that everything was so cheap! If you like your little “toddy” at night just go to where we were. Most “hard tack” was € 5.00 per liter or two for € 8.00! Some is sold in plastic bottles! Good wine for around € 2.00 per bottle. In other shops most things were also around the € 5.00 mark. Some shops advertising “TODO” (which means “Everything” or “All”) at € 6.00 or even two items at that price. Of course you are not looking at superb stuff but it was certainly good enough to kit yourself out for a summer holiday!

One day we took one of the oldest tourist trains from Benidorm to Gata de Gorgos. The “Limón Express”. This is about an hour and a half trip in an ancient, restored train.

That was magnificent!

The service was superb. We were collected from the hotel and taken back there again afterwards.

In Gata we visited one of the oldest private guitar factories and saw them making guitars there. All handmade and not expensive at all!

The journey back was for many one big haze. The tour staff opened literally dozens of crates of champagne and kept on popping corks the whole hour and a half back to Benidorm. Some of it ending up in the glasses but a lot being used to spray the people! They virtually forced people to drink up! I am not really a big champagne lover and, needles to say, was quite sober upon our arrival.

All in all it was a good week and a good rest. Swimming in the Mediteranian, walking along the boulevards and visiting the Tapas bars at night in the old Town.
Sitting on “terrasjes” and just generally relaxing.

When we arrived back at Zaventem Airport where Gwendy came to fetch us it was cold and rainy! And me still in my shorts and shirt!

As soon as we came home we switched on the heating and I guess it will now stay on till next summer.

 


 

September was a nice and quiet month. It gave us time to consolidate and take stock of what to do for the remainder of the year.
The Biltong Buddy took off like a firecracker and well over one hundred are now happily humming away making biltong for their proud owners.

Just a little tip for those people though. If you find that your meat is not drying fast enough just replace the 15 watt globe with a 25 watt pear-shaped (candle) globe. It works like a dream and is a bit quicker!

So, with Christmas around the corner and winter on its way we are moving in to the last couple of weeks of this year. If you want to order anything from the web site for family or friends for Christmas please do so timely. It takes time to get to its destination from SA.

Keep well and we’ll speak again next month!

Adios Amigos!!

Lo

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Food for thought


Absolute rubbish but some just might make you think

  • Why is it that people say they “slept like a baby” when babies wake up like every two hours?
  • Why do birds bob their heads when they walk?
  • When people say if you eat dessert before dinner it will ruin your appetite won’t eating dinner before dessert ruin your appetite for dessert?
  • What would happen if everyone was to flush their toilet at the same time?
  • If you died on the International Dateline, and half of you were on 1 side and the other half on the other side, what day would you die?
  • If people with one arm go to get their nails done, do they pay half price?
  • If the weather man says “it’s a 50% chance of rain” does that mean he has no idea if its going to rain or not?
  • When you snap your fingers, does the sound occur when your middle finger releases from your thumb, or when your middle finger hits the palm of your hand?
  • Why are you IN a movie, but your ON TV?
  • If shampoo comes in so many colors, why is the lather on your head always white?
  • Why do people, such as S.W.A.T or Seals wear the bulletproof vests where you can see them? Wouldn’t people aim for their head or crotch?
  • If you don’t pay your exorcist, do you get repossessed?
  • How come when you go in the front door of a church, you are at the back of the church, and if you go in the back door, you would end up in the front of the church?
  • If you eat regular rice crispies with chocolate milk will it taste the same as eating co-co crispies with regular milk?
  • Why is Bra singular and Panties plural?
  • What are those little things on the end of your shoelaces called?
  • Do fish ever get thirsty?
  • Why can’t we sneeze with our eyes open?
  • On a hamburger bun, why is the top bun always bigger than the bottom one?
  • Why do the numbers on the phone go one way, but the numbers on the calculator go the other way?
  • Do bald men wash their head with soap or shampoo?
  • If all the nations in the world are in debt, where did all the money go?
  • If rabbits’ feet are so lucky, then what happened to the rabbit?

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The history of ….

Last month we started on a short exploration to find out where some of the every day things we use or eat actually come from.


Here is the contribution for this month. 


Who does not like chocolate but have we ever stood still and given some thought where this normal everyday delicacy came from?
Chocolate was introduced to Spain when Christopher Columbus returned from his fourth voyage to the New World in 1502.

Chocolate grew in popularity with the Spaniards, who had learned its use from the Aztecs at the time of the invasion by the Spanish explorer Hernán Cortés in 1519. Cortés tasted chocolate prepared by the Aztecs and learned how to convert the bitter bean into a wonderful drink. He brought this treasure back to Spain where the origin and preparation method remained a secret for nearly 100 years.

In France, chocolate was met with skepticism and was considered a “barbarous product and noxious drug”. The French court was doubtful and accepted it only after the Paris faculty of medicine gave its approval. A French queen finally saved the day. In 1615, Anne of Austria, wife of Louis XIII declared chocolate as the drink of the French court.

 

During the early seventeenth century, chocolate found its way to Italy and England, among other European countries. In 1650, chocolate became the rage in Oxford and in 1657, a shop called the The Coffee Mill and Tobacco Roll opened in London. Although chocolate was not featured, the drink quickly became a best seller.

As the popularity of chocolate grew, England imposed an excessive duty of 10-15 shillings per pound. By the way, the duty was comparable to approximately three-fourths its weight in gold. It took almost 200 years before the duty was dropped.

In the United States, chocolate was first manufactured in 1765. It was introduced at Milton Lower Mills, near Dorchester, Massachusetts by John Hanau and James Baker who opened a processing house.

The Swiss began making chocolate in the mid 1800’s. Switzerland, at the time, had cows but did not have abundant commodities of chocolate and sugar. In 1876, M. Daniel Peter attempted to add milk to chocolate to produce a smoother chocolate. However, adding water to chocolate made the chocolate shrink, separate and generally disintegrate. Milk has water in it, and it took Peter 8 years of experimenting before taking his product to Henry Nestle, a maker of evaporated milk. Nestle had perfected the manufacture of condensed milk, and he and Peter hit upon the idea of mixing sweetened condensed milk with chocolate.
The invention of the cocoa press in 1828 by C. J. Van Houten, a Dutch chocolate master, helped reduce the price of chocolate and bring it to the masses. By squeezing out cocoa butter from the beans, Van Houten’s “Dutching” was an alkalizing process which removed the acidity and bitterness, which is why alkali processed cocoa is also called Dutch chocolate.

Chocolate was available only as cocoa or as a liquid until 1879. It was Rodolphe Lindt who thought to add cocoa butter back to the chocolate. Adding the additional cocoa butter helped the chocolate set up into a bar that “snaps” when broken as well as melting on the tongue.

It was World War I that really brought attention to the chocolate candies.
The U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps had commissioned various American chocolate manufacturers to provide 10 – 20 kilogram blocks of chocolate to be shipped to bases in the field. The blocks were chopped up into smaller pieces and distributed to “doughboys” in Europe. Eventually the task of making smaller pieces was turned back to the manufacturers.

One of the more widely used and well known chocolates is the Cadburys Chocolate.
A one-man business, opened in 1824 by a young Quaker, John Cadbury, in Bull Street Birmingham, was to be the foundation of Cadbury Limited, now one of the world’s largest chocolate producers. By 1831 the business had changed from a grocery shop and John Cadbury had become a manufacturer of drinking chocolate and cocoa, the start of the Cadbury manufacturing business as it is known today.

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Our Home Biltong Makers


Bringing Home the Biltong – To Finland!!
(By Curt West, Ekenas, Finland)

To paraphrase Martin Luther King: “I had a dream!”

That dream was to hunt Africa. I was realistic about it though and planned to do it with a good friend once the kids were grownup and we could maybe afford it.

In the meantime we were quite satisfied hunting Elk and Deer in Finland and reading books by the great African hunters like Hemingway, Ruark, Bell and Taylor.

Biltong was mentioned in quite a few of these books and we had a vague notion of some kind of smelly dried bushmeat that you ate instead of starving – and only then!

Our heavy opinions were probably due to the fact that very little meat is dried in Finland, this of course due to our humid weather (in Lapland some Reindeer meat is dried in the winter but I´ve never tasted it).

Well our plan of going hunting once we had our pensions had to be given up because three years ago I was diagnosed as having melanoma and I woke up to the reality of “It´s now or never”!

My friend, BE, backed me up saying that he´d find the money as long as I didn´t die.
To make a really long story short(er) we hunted in the Limpopo Province (The old Northern Transvaal) and I suddenly understood that one does not visit Africa only once. It get´s under your skin like a poison and does not let go.
This is due to several factors:

  • Great weather
  • Great scenery
  • Great hunting
  • Great people
  • Great food

The list goes on and on and on and………

One day Tino Erasmus (our host and PH) presented us with some biltong. “It´s a traditional food, you may not like it he said”. Polite as always I tried a sliver and another sliver and I was hooked! After that I started smuggling (I confess, guilty as charged) biltong from South Africa but sadly it never lasted for very many days as the kids ripped it out of my hands and I had to force-feed myself so that I´d get my share, preferably all of it!

Then one day I stumbled on to the Biltongmakers>Com website and after thinking it over for several seconds I placed my order for a biltongmaker!
I was pretty sure that it would not work and that I´d end up with another useless contraption.

Wrong again!

I received the Rockey’s Biltong Maker three days ago and started my first batch. The meat used was venison from Elk and Whitetail Deer. I used the Quick Biltong Recipe that I found on the web site and the spices that came with the Biltong Maker. The whitetail didn´t work and that was probably due to poor meat quality (the dogs loved it though).
The Elk I have just taken out of the Biltong maker and chopped it into pieces two hours ago. The smell was right! It looked genuine! The texture was perfect!

And now it´s gone!

The kids ripped it out of my hands and after a few mouthfulls said “Just like in Africa Dad!” My wife loved it (and was surprised) and my neighbour ate several pieces asking “What do you call this?” and not hearing my answers.

So I´m now thawing out another five kilos of meat and I´ve sent my wife to the store to buy coriander.

What can I say?

It works! The recipe is great and the end result fantastic!

I´m pretty sure that I have brought biltong to Finland.

History will remember me!

Curt West
Finland

(Thank you very much for such a nice story Curt! All the best – Ed)

 


 

You can order the new BILTONG BUDDY now by going to our order page or you can have a look at it first by clicking on the link below.

Details of the New “BILTONG BUDDY” can be found here.

More and more people like Curt, are making larger batches of Biltong at one time. Rockey’s New Age 5kg Biltong maker is just ideal for that purpose!

Details on Rockey’s machine can be found by clicking on this link.

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This month’s special offer !

A free wooden Biltong Cutter with the first 20 orders placed after 09-10-2004!

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Tip of the month

 

Here are some general tips for this month

 

    • When using the Traditional 2kg Home Biltong maker use a piece of extractor hood filter in the bottom of the machine. It lets the heat through but will prevent the dripping getting on the bottom plate.
    • If your meat does not dry fast enough to your liking in the new Biltong Buddy just replace the 15 watt globe with a 25 watt pear-shaped (candle) globe. It will reduce drying time by +/- 1 day.
    • When making Biltong in a Home Biltong Maker (and not only ours), you should make sure that the meat is not cut too thick. Remember that we are not trying to make Biltong like they do it at the butcher in South Africa, half a cow at a time! Cut the meat to a maximum of 1cm thickness. The thicker the meat the longer it will take to dry!
      When making Biltong the meat should be dry in no more that 4-5 days to prevent mould occurring.
  • If some people really don’t want to receive our newsletter all they have to do is to click on the unsubscribe button at the bottom of the letter. Sometimes we hear from people who don’t want to read our efforts and they can get quite nasty about it too! The problem is that they don’t (or can’t) read. Just unsubscribe and you are rid of us for good!

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Questions and Answers


This month we are again publishing some of the many requests we receive from our readers all over the world.
If you have an answer for these people please mail them?
 



QUESTION

I am making biltong in Canada and I could not find brown vinegar.
I followed your versatile recipe, but the vinegar taste is to strong.(I used apple cider vinegar.)

What can I do?

Juan-Marco
Canada

 


 

We have been getting the question about vinegar often lately. It is difficult to find brown vinegar in most parts of the world. Does anyone have a suggestion as to a good replacement for brown vinegar? – Ed

 


 

QUESTION

Hi there Biltong Team!

I was wondering if you could give me some advice. I was given a Potjie Pot which was not cleaned properly or oiled. It has now got a very rusted look.
Firstly if you oil it well, will the rust disappear? Or what must you treat it with to get rid of the rust? If you oil it and rub it with a tissue the tissue is very soiled with rust oil.
Do you think that one will be able to cook in the pot eventually or just use it as a flower pot?

Regards
Irene
South Africa

ANSWER

Dear Irene,

Do not worry!
You will use your pot again to cook in!

Some time ago I did a Potjiekos for a group of about 100 people (size 25 Pot) and, it being the end of summer (and being lazy), just left it where it was for the whole of the winter.
When I fetched it back it was still caked with food and completely rusted of course.
I went to the hardware store and got myself a bottle of rust remover. Using my high pressure (Kärcher) machine I cleaned the Pot as well as I could. I then painted the whole Pot with the rust remover and left it for a day or so.
Using gloves again and some goggles I scrubbed the Pot down with a steel brush attached to a drill. Most of the rust came of that way.
I repeated this process a couple of times and the Pot looks as good as it did when I bought it. With a smaller pot you could just use the rust remover and some very coarse sand paper.

After the pot is clean wash it well with hot water and soap and let it dry.
Then take some cooking oil (I didn’t have any and used olive oil-I was not popular!) and pour some in the Pot. Not too much now! Take a clean cloth (old tea towel or so) and rub the whole Pot with a very thin layer of oil.
It takes a little elbow grease but it is really worth it!
Good luck!

 



ANY SOUTH AFRICANS NEAR US?

Hi there – thanks for your interesting newsletter – it keeps me linked with ‘home’.

I live in England and have not managed to meet any South Africans here where I live – I wish I could!
We live in Malvern in Worcs and it would be great to hear from other South Africans. Any South Africans near us?

Vicky Beart
sierra18@btopenworld.com

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Recipe corner


Two kinds of South African Fritters!

South African Sweet Potato Fritters

Ingredients

 

  • 1 egg – beaten
  • 1 teaspoon Salt and freshly ground black pepper — to taste
  • 1 tablespoon Peanut oil for frying
  • 1/2 kg sweet potatoes – peeled and cut in half
  • 0.5 cup flour

Method

  • In a heavy saucepan or fryer, heat 2 inches of oil to 180-190C
  • Grate the sweet potatoes into medium-sized bowl, cover them with boiling water and let them stand for 15 minutes
  • Drain off the water and slowly add the flour, egg, salt and pepper, stirring to make sure that they are well mixed
  • You should have a thickish paste that will hold its shape when picked up in a tablespoon
  • If the mixture is too thick, add a bit of warm water. If it is too thin, add a bit more flour
  • Drop the mixture, a few tablespoons at a time, into the hot oil and cook the fritters for 3 to 5 minutes, or until they float to the surface, turning them once to make sure that they are slightly browned on each side
  • Drain on absorbent paper and serve hot

One of the tricks to great fritters is to use clean oil and to make sure that the oil is hot enough before beginning.

These fritters can be accompanied by a spicy hot sauce when served as an appetizer course. Alternatively, they can be lightly dusted with sugar and served as a dessert.

 



Pumpkin Fritters

Ingredients

  • 4 cl cooked mashed pumpkin
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup flour
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 30 ml (2 tablespoons) heaped of sugar

Method

Combine all ingredients, making a soft batter and fry spoonfulls in shallow oil till both sides are lightly browned.
Drain on paper and serve warm with cinnamon sugar or caramel sauce

Cinnamon Sugar

Take 30 grams of ground cinnamon and mix with 180 grams of sugar. Sprinkle over pancakes as much as desired and keep rest in bottle for later use.
(Tastes fine over sweet potato too)

Caramel Sauce

  • 250 ml sugar
  • 500 ml water
  • 500 ml milk
  • 30 ml margarine
  • 20 ml cornstarch mixed to a paste with water

Cook together and add one teaspoon caramel essence before serving over the pumpkin fritter

(By kind permission of Pete from Pete’s web site)

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Around the World


From the far Outback
(somewhere near the entrance to the Great Barrier Reef)

By Nico Botha

(Continuation of last month)

Nico’s Kapater Story

Danielle gave birth to our laatlammertjie here in Far North Queensland on 06/07/04 at the Proserpine Hospital. The “baby catcher” was a Doctor from South Africa, nogal a Botha!
She, yes my friends, is a lady, a “housepal” and here is my story!

Think you better sit down!

It took a lot of “motivation” to go for the removal of my Kapater derm.
And so my Mates and Pelle from home marched me into the same hospital a few days later to have the snip!
This is a small community and we all know if somebody is not well or in hospital.

My first shock came when an Aussie mate’s mother told me she will do the knip of my hair en skeer ou Jonas se krulkop so mooi bles dat ek eindelik hoendervleis op my knatersak gekry het!

Step two was Jonas word ontsmet.
My best friend for years got painted with an dark brown jelly type antiseptic.
I was so shocked, seeing Jonas all dark brown.
Thought for a minute it was the working tool of ou Alan Hendrikse!

I felt so sad for die Mannetjie but still the end was not in sight!!

They took my weight, blood pressure, and the rest, made me sign on the dotted line, wished me well and trolleyed me into the theater!

Almal had pink gloves on and to my shock from the 1/2 a dozen standing there most were my Skippy’s best mates! (for those uninitiated, Skippy is Nico’s wife-Ed)
Now it flashes through my boere brein that they were all there to check ou Jonas out.
I later learned they did!!

Buggers!

Half under the drugs and nearly asleep they (the gang) started the operation!

My balsak snipped open and a kilometer or two of flexi pipe removed!

I woke up an hour or so later and had the shock of my life!
Painted like Allan Hendrikse in a District 6 colour code of browns all over my body by Skippy’s best mates! Half aan die slaap I thought I had too much Klippies and Coca Cola, then I saw this colour spectacle on my humble body!

They kept me another two hours and then Skippy arrived! She laughed so much I thought she had a jolly good idea what they were planning to do with me!

Good grounds for a “de-wors” hey!!

Well I came home and the ball bag decided to swell to the size of a horse! I thought for a minute they had stuck a cocoa-nut or two in it. It was so sensitive I could not touch it!

Jonas looked like a Volkswagen Combi with a PUTCO bus enjin stuck to the side of it!!

I phoned my trusted mates and they all popped over the next day and wanted to see the scar and toolbag as they all wanted to go for the snip at a later stage!
I scared the living day into them when I dropped my khaki shorts!

It took a lot of courage to drop the pants, and see the pain in their eyes when they saw Jonas, now Alan! Made me get tears in my eyes!

Sorry ou Jonas!

The Ooh’s and Eina’s and dammit ou pel dit lyk fokkin seer made me wonder why in the hell I did it!

At least Jannie said he now understands why we have blou bal apies in Africa! That is a warning to us humans what doctors will do to us in Hospital!

It has now taken two weeks to get the Allan Hendrikse paint colour code off and away from Jonas! He looks nice again. Real human I should say!

Do not go for this op!!

I now have scared so many others away, that the baby boom in this region will continue for ever and ever!

The swelling is down, the colour is back and the mates have sympathy! But be assured my friends, before I ever have anything removed in the distant future I will make sure I book into a hospital a thousand clicks from here and use an alias!

Groete from Kapater Botha!

 



PS: My son Cieron (5 years old) came into the shower and saw the swollen size bag and said! “Hey Pops, who kicked you in the nuts”?
And that what he saw he told his teacher at school the next day!

Loop Mooi

Nico
(Ethnic colour = Spierwit with a touch of Capie Brown in isolated parts!!)

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Smile a While


Biltong Muslim?

This is a genuine enquiry we received on September 15,2004. We get many like these but this one we had to share with you.

 


 

Hi Biltong Team,

I have read your articles on biltong on the web site and it is very interesting.
I want to make my own biltong at home for the family and would like to know more about your 2kg biltong maker and its price.

I live in Johannesburg and maybe you could advise me where is the closest place to purchase this device.

I love biltong so much that I was thinking of changing my surname to Biltong but my wife being Indian Muslim objected when she heard that in Dutch Bil means buttock and Tong means strips.

Now she said, picture a Muslim in his garb with Biltong as a surname.

I said to her that it sounded tasty.

Thanks and kind regards

Mark Morgan

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SportTalk


Rugby
Honesty is the best policy Mr White!
(By Michael Shafto October 02 2004)

Spoilt for choice is supposed to be a coach’s dream. However, it can also make things dreadfully difficult for the poor man, too. More than anything else it presents a huge challenge to his honesty.

This is the dilemma staring Springbok coach Jake White squarely in the face.

His big moment, the so-called Grand Slam tour (if the Boks can beat the Four Home Nations on the trot), is around the corner.

The Currie Cup final is only a month away, and soon White and the national selectors will have to sit down and make some very difficult choices.

 

Until now, White has proved an innovative coach with vision They must first decide what shape the Springbok team will take – how many players will be needed for such an arduous Test-match tour. Remember, in addition to the Four Home Unions there’s also Argentina to consider. Then equally important, White must decide on the best deployment of talent at his disposal.


One feels sure that White, even if he manages to avoid reading press reports, must be heartily sick of being told his captain John Smit isn’t the country’s best hooker. Frankly, when you mop up the emotion surrounding the issue, it’s probably a very close call as to whether Gary Botha is truly a better player than the Springbok skipper. Each of them has special qualities that have brought them to the top of the heap.

However, what is certain is that Smit, who enjoys a special rapport among the players, is indisputably the best available captain.

There is also the Lions youngster Schalk Britz to consider, though at this stage, he is probably a season off the pace. But his turn will undoubtedly come.

How many hookers can White take on tour is question number one. Number two is: can the rugby public take on trust the assurances from both White and Sarfu president Brian van Rooyen, that the quota system is a thing of the past?

Transformation is a word the rugby hierarchy have been juggling with for some time, and as a process, at times it seems to defy exact definition. Indeed, it would not be unfair to say it means many different things, depending on the circumstances.

Whatever spin it’s given, however, it has to be admitted that solid servant though he may be, Hanyani Shimange is not the country’s second-best hooker. Unless White wants to stand accused of favouritism or a bias against a very fine player, he must somehow make a plan to include Gary Botha in his overseas squad.

Indeed, it’s something of a Botha/Bulls migraine that must have White regularly calling his pharmacy these days for those well-known senior person’s headache powders!

This reference, of course, is to the Bulls’ other Botha of renown – namely centre, Ettienne – whose consistent delivery of high-class performances has been a highlight of this year’s Currie Cup.

Yes, the best of centres generally come in pairs. Remember how Danie Craven chose Tjol Lategan and Ryk van Schoor as his midfield without hesitation, even though Lategan was sometimes left out of the Western Province team by the provincial selectors?

De Wet Barry and Marius Joubert – a solid pairing forged in the heat of Test match battle – are White’s current choice for the Boks. This year, in a series of internationals leading up to the Springboks’ Tri-Nations triumph, the pair played a significant role.

But Ettienne Botha – strong and robust, with plenty of flair besides – and the Lions’ Brian Habana, whom White has already identified as a diamond in the rough, could develop into an equally effective combination.

Another who deserves the special attention of the Bok coach is Lions scrumhalf Enrico Januarie.
Though inclined to selfishness at times, he has the hallmarks of a class scrumhalf and deserves encouragement for a consistent season of high performance.

There’s still the “player without a province”, Luke Watson, and flyhalf Andre Pretorius, if fit, who deserve serious consideration. Several others, too, merit closer inspection.

Until now, White has proved an innovative coach with vision, unafraid to back his own instincts. Now he stands before his most demanding test.

It is one that, with the extension this week of his contract until after the 2007 World Cup, will define his role in the modern development of this country’s rugby.

(This article was originally published on page 14 of The Independent on Saturday on October 02, 2004)

 



-Where can you watch rugby on TV?-
Click here to find out where in most countries!

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The Competition


The winner of the September Competition

The winner of the September competition is Jaco van der Westhuizen from Potchefstroom in South Africa!

Congratulations Jaco, your Potjie Pot is on its way to you. With the summer on its way in South Africa you will have loads of fun cooking up a storm!
If you need any good Potjiekos recipes please look on our web site or mail us for more.

 



Remember the following:

 

  • The monthly draw or competition is totally free to everyone.
  • You can enter as many times as you like.
  • You can only enter via the Competition link on our home page or by clicking here
  • All prizes are sent to the winners free of charge.

 

The prize for the October

The winner for the competition for October 2004 will receive one of our brand-new Biltong Buddy Home Biltong Makers as well as enough Biltong Spice to make 20kg of Biltong!!

Click here to see a picture of it on the competition page!

To enter the competition all you have to do is to visit our home page at www.biltongmakers.com and click on one of the two competition links.

The winners of all competitions are notified by email.

Some of the other prizes for the year

 

  • Biltongmakers
  • Biltong spices
  • Boerewors spices
  • Braai tool sets
  • Potjie Pots
  • Barbecues
  • Cadac Skottel Braais and………. much, much more!!!

 

So, don’t wait!

You can enter right now by clicking on the competition link on our home page.

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A free Biltong Maker!


It’s easy to earn a free Biltong Maker!

As a South African orientated web site we are constantly looking to contact more and more South Africans across the world.
Not only to tell them about how they can make their own Biltong but also to give them a chance to share their stories with other South Africans the world over.

So, here is your chance to help us.

If you know about a South African family or friend living near you or perhaps somewhere far away, why not tell them about us and then us about them.
Perhaps you can send us their email address so that we can mail them a copy of this newsletter.
If they like it they can stay on the mailing list, if not they can just let us know and we will remove them.

If the response we receive is large enough and, directly due to your efforts people place orders with us, you could be rewarded by receiving one of our products totally free of charge.

What an easy way to perhaps get your own Home Biltong Maker without having to pay a cent for it!

You can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com

During August many people went to the trouble once again of submitting their friend’s and family’s names and we would like to thank all!

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Let’s hear from you!


Help us to make it even better!

Many people are subscribing to this newsletter every day. Mostly they do so because they enjoy reading it and like to hear from people in other parts of the world.

If you are one of our subscribers why don’t you write something yourself?

Just like you enjoy reading about what other people are up to, they might enjoy reading about you and your family.
Why not put pen to paper (or fingers to the keyboard!), and tell us about anything interesting. About life in your part of the world, what you do and how you live. Perhaps something that happened to you.
You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask.

Perhaps you have some advice to give?
You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Of course it does not have to be about Biltong or food. Anything that is of interest is welcome!
Share it with other people around the world!

It would be so nice to hear from you!

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Boerewors in the Benelux


Still some Boerewors left

We are coming to the end of the season and will probably be making one more large batch of boerewors. So, if you want to stock up for the winter now is the time to do so. Click to me me biggerBoerewors keeps very well for a couple of months provided it is wrapped/packed well and kept frozen at around -20 Celcius. (More than -18C).

The price is € 8.50 per kilogram for the smaller quantities under 50kg. Over 50kg it is € 7.00 when you come and fetch in Keerbergen and € 7.50 if we deliver to you. (Benelux only)

Please keep in mind that we also do Boerewors rolls and Potjiekos for up to 100 people as well as “Lamb-on-the-Spit” for functions. So if you are planning anything please let us know?

Interested parties can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com for details or phone us at +32 (16) 53.96.25.

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Potjie Pots in the Benelux

Click to me me bigger

During September we took delivery of another batch of size 3 and 4 Potjie Pots. There are still some left.

For those who are interested please call us at +32 (16) 53.96.25

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Previous issues of this Newsletter

 

You can click on the links below to view some of the previous issues of our newsletter.

June 2003
July 2003
August 2003
September 2003
October 2003
November 2003
December 2003
Jan/Feb 2004
March 2004
April 2004
May 2004
June 2004
July 2004
August 2004
September 2004
October 2004


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Subscribing and unsubscribing


Perhaps you would like to subscribe to this newsletter or tell a friend about Biltongmakers.Com! and the incredible Biltong Makers!!
You can be included in this newsletter by clicking on the following link.
Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

If you prefer not to receive email from us, you can unsubscribe from Biltongmakers.Com! by clicking on this link.
Unsubscribe me please.

 

September 2004

The Newsletter
September 2004

You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
If you do not wish to receive this newsletter you may unsubscribe at the bottom where you will find an automatic link. Your name will then be permanently deleted from our database.
If you, your family or your friends want to subscribe to the newsletter please click on this link. Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

In this Newsletter

Just click on any of the subjects to jump straight to it

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From the editor

Keerbergen
Belgium
September 2, 2004

You know what is the best part of doing this newsletter month after month?

The incredible feedback people send!

Of course there are some people who mail and ask to be “unsubscribed” and to please stop sending them “that c&%p”.

That is when I wonder why I do this. But, then all these mails arrive from people who are wondering where their newsletter is and, just because we are a bit late sometimes, ask us if we have forgotten them!
That and all the “Thank You” and other mails of encouragement keep us going again.

That’s when I feel on top of the world!

So it is September again and a brand-new issue of the newsletter is at hand.

In this issue I particularly like the “Botha Story” from Nico in Australia. June and I had a couple of good laughs when we first read it. It’s a pity I can’t let you read all of Nico’s mails because it would take up a whole newsletter on its own. However, next month a bit more from him!

So, as I said it’s September and here, in Belgium, we are moving towards the Autumn and Winter.

I can actually see it on our web site every morning. The Jo’burg temperatures are now occasionally higher than in Brussels.

June and I are looking forward to the winter. For us the summer is nice but we still long for those quiet cozy winter evenings in front of a log fire with the snow outside and the candles burning inside. A glass of red wine, a nice plate of food……

Nothing better than that!

But, before we get there we will probably go on a short holiday. The last holiday we had was in 1997 in Mauritius. That was great but it’s time for another one after almost 7 years!

So, this month we will probably go to Croatia. Friends of Derek and Jeanine’s have an apartment in Porec, “just” across the Adriatic sea from Venice.

It would mean an air trip to Venice and then the Ferry to Porec.

Would you believe that a one-way airfare (Ryanair) to Venice costs a wholesome € 0.90!!!. (This is NOT a typing mistake!). So what if we have to bring our own “sarmies” for the 2 hour flight!

After that it is a 4 hour ferry ride on the Hovercraft to Porec.

But, let’s first see if it all works out! If it does you will certainly hear all about it next month!

 



At last we have our new Home Biltong Maker in stock and ready to ship.

In fact a lot have already gone out at the special introductory price for the first 100 units.

We are all very excited about our new “BILTONG BUDDY”.
It promises to be the ideal Home Biltong Maker for anyone!

One of the most attractive things about the “BUDDY” is that it is so light!

The big problem with all previous models of Biltong Makers has never been the price of the machine but the shipping charges!
We charge basically whatever the Post Office rate is. But it is still soooo expensive!

With the new “BILTONG BUDDY”” mailing charges are way down because the machine weighs (packed in its box) just around 2.5kg!
Surface mail to Australia for example is now only R 170.00 and to Canada just R 150.00!

I have just received my own machine and thanks to dear old Trish in Johannesburg, who organized everything, it looks like a million dollars (Euros, Pounds, Rands??).

It works like a dream and looks very smart too!

So, take the opportunity and order one now! The price will be only R 490.00 for the first 100 orders placed.

After that it will go up to the normal retail price of R 590.00.

 



Well, here we go into the last part of the year.

Please let us hear from you, wherever you are? Just look at the contributions this month and the joy it will bring to so many people.

You could also do just that!

Have a good one and till next month!

Lo

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Food for thought


Shake it off

One day a farmer’s donkey fell down into a well. The animal cried piteously for hours as the farmer tried to figure out what to do.

Finally, he decided the animal was old, and the well needed to be covered up anyway; it just wasn’t worth it to retrieve the donkey. He invited all his neighbors to come over and help him. They all grabbed a shovel and began to shovel dirt into the well. At first, the donkey realized what was happening and cried horribly. Then, to everyone’s amazement he quieted down.

A few shovel loads later, the farmer finally looked down the well. He was astonished at what he saw. With each shovel of dirt that hit his back, the donkey was doing something amazing. He would shake it off and take a step up

As the farmer’s neighbours continued to shovel dirt on top of the animal, he would shake it off and take a step up. Pretty soon, everyone was amazed as the donkey stepped up over the edge of the well and happily trotted off!
Life is going to shovel dirt on you, all kinds of dirt. The trick to getting out of the well is to shake it off and take a step up. Each of our troubles is a steppingstone.

 

We can get out of the deepest wells just by not stopping, never giving up!
Shake it off and take a step up.
Remember the five simple rules to be happy:

  • Free your heart from hatred – Forgive.
  • Free your mind from worries – Most never happen.
  • Live simply and appreciate what you have.
  • Give more.
  • Expect less

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The history of ….

This month we will start on a short exploration to where some of the every day things we use or eat actually come from.


Here is the contribution for this month.


 

 

The history of the potato

The history of the potato has its roots in the wind-swept Andes Mountains of South America. It is an austere region plagued by fluctuating temperatures and poor soil conditions.

Yet the tough and durable potato evolved in its thin air (elevations up to 15,000 feet), climbing ever higher like the Incas who first settled the region. Ancient Inca potatoes had dark purplish skins and yellow flesh. The Incas called the potato “papas”, as they still do today.
In the ancient ruins of Peru and Chile, archaeologists have found potato remains that date back to 500 B.C. The Incas grew and ate them and also worshipped them. They even buried potatoes with their dead, they stashed potatoes in concealed bins for use in case of war or famine, they dried them, and carried them on long journeys to eat on the way (dried or soaked in stew)

The first Europeans to see the potato was Pedro de Cieza de Leon (1518–1560), Spanish Conquistador and historian, who wrote about the potato in his chronicles, Chronicles of Peru.

Though the tuber was productive and hardy, the Spanish put it to very limited use. In the Spanish Colonies potatoes were considered food for the underclasses; when brought to the Old World they would be used primarily to feed hospital inmates.

 

The potato was always thought to be a poisonous plant causing severe illnesses It would take three decades for the potato to spread to the rest of Europe. Even so the potato was cultivated primarily as a curiosity by amateur botanists. Resistance was due to ingrained eating habits, the tuber’s reputation as a food for the underpriveleged and perhaps most importantly its relationship to poisonous plants.The potato is a member of the nightshade family and its leaves are, indeed, poisonous.


A potato left too long in the light will begin to turn green. The green skin contains a substance called solanine which can cause the potato to taste bitter and even cause illness in humans. Such drawbacks were understood in Europe, but the advantages, generally, were not.

Europe would wait until the 1780’s before the potato gained prominence anywhere. About 1780 the people of Ireland adopted the rugged food crop. The primary reason for its acceptance in Ireland was its ability to produce abundant, nutritious food. Unlike any other major crop, potatoes contain most of the vitamins needed for sustenance.

Perhaps more importantly, potatoes can provide this sustenance to nearly 10 people on an acre of land. This would be one of the prime factors causing a population explosion in the early 1800s. Of course, by the mid-1800’s the Irish would become so dependent upon this crop that its failure would provoke a famine.
While in Ireland the potato gained acceptance from the bottom up, in France the potato was imposed upon society by an intellectual.

Antoine Augustine Parmentier saw that the nutritional benefits of the crop combined with its productive capacity could be a boon to the French farmer. He was a pharmacist, chemist and employee of Louis XV. Parmentier discovered the benefits of the potato while held prisoner by the Prussians during the Seven Years War. He was so enamored by the potato that he determined that it should become a staple of the French diet.

After failing by conventional means to convince Frenchmen of its advantages, he determined upon a surreptitious means of making his point.
Parmentier acquired a miserable and unproductive spot of ground on the outskirts of Paris. There, he planted 50 acres of potatoes. During the day, he set a guard over it. This drew considerable attention in the neighbourhood. In the evening the guard was relaxed and the locals came to see what all the fuss was about.
Believing this plant must be valuable, many peasants “acquired” some of the potatoes from the plot, and soon were growing the root in their own garden plots. Their resistance was overcome by their curiosity and desire to better their lot with the obviously valuable new produce.

Today, the potato is so common, plentiful and pervasive in the Western diet that it is taken for granted.
We forget that it has only been with us for a few hundred years.


Potato Quotes
My idea of heaven is a great big baked potato and someone to share it with.”
Oprah Winfrey


“Only two things in this world are too serious to be jested on, potatoes and matrimony.”
Irish saying


If beef’s the king of meat, potato’s the queen of the garden world.
Irish Saying


“Potatoes served at breakfast.
At dinner served again; Potatoes served at supper, Forever and Amen!”

Pennsylvania prayer


“What I say is that, if a fellow really likes potatoes, he must be a pretty decent sort of fellow.”
A. A. Milne (1882-1956)



Potato Myths
Laying a potato peel at the door of a girl on May Day showed her that you disliked her.


If a woman is expecting a baby, she should not eat potatoes because the baby will be born with a big head.


A potato in your pocket will cure rheumatism and eczema.


If you have a wart, rub it with a cut potato, then bury the potato in the ground. As the potato rots in the ground, your wart will disappear.


What do you say to an angry 300-pound baked potato?
Anything, just butter him up.

 

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Our Home Biltong Makers


The all new “BILTONG BUDDY” is here and available for immediate shipping!!

The past couple of months we have been working hard on a very exciting project and it has now finally come about!

We are proudly announcing the arrival of our latest addition!

The “BILTONG BUDDY”

We believe that our new Home Biltong maker will be a “BUDDY” to all people who love their Biltong and have found it too expensive to buy a Home Biltong Maker of their own! Until now that is!

The “BILTONG BUDDY” is the answer!!

Our new ‘BILTONG BUDDY’ Home Biltong Maker has some distinct advantages over the Traditional 2kg Home Biltong Maker. These advantages are:

  • No more element; it uses a 15 watt globe.
    • This means that you will no longer have to buy spare elements and the power consumption is only one third of what the old model used!
  • The “BILTONG BUDDY” is made of a rigid PST, just like its brother, Rockey’s New Age Biltong maker.
    • This means that it is much lighter in weight which means a lot less mailing charges!! (Surface mail to Australia only R 170.00 and to Canada R 150.00!!)
  • The new “BILTONG BUDDY” dries meat in less than 4 days!
    • This means that you can now make more Biltong than ever before!
  • And last, but certainly not least, it will cost ONLY R 490.00!!*
    • This means that we are back to prices charged in 1999!

So, lets summarize:

  • A lighter machine means less mailing charges!
  • A lower price means that more people can afford it!
  • Lower power consumption also means less cost to you!

You can order the new BILTONG BUDDY now by going to our order page or you can have a look at it first.

Details of the New “BILTONG BUDDY” can be found here.

More and more people are into making larger batches of Biltong at one time. Rockey’s New Age 5kg Biltong maker is just ideal for that purpose!

Details on Rockey’s machine can be found by clicking on this link.

*(For the first 100 units)

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This month’s special offer !


Free spices with each Biltong Maker ordered!

This month we will throw in a free packet of our Nice ‘n Spicy spices with each Biltong maker ordered.

The spice will be either our Curry Marsala or the world famous South African Bobotie spice.

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Tip of the month


The other day I was traveling back from Veldhoven in Holland when “Suzie” took me on the shortest route through the little country lanes and meadows of Southern Holland and into Belgium.

Just after I turned yet another corner I stopped in amazement!

There on my left was the most beautiful little cart packed full with bunches of sunflowers.
I got out of the car and looked around for someone to help me.
No-one was to be found.

As I walked around the cart I saw a little notice stuck to the side.
It simply said:”€ 3.00 per bunch. Please put the money in the tin”
Yet another of these little unexpected experiences here in Europe.
I wondered what would have happened to the tin with the money, or even the flowers or, worse even, the cart in some parts of the world!

Anyway I took two bunches, put the money in the tin and they looked fabulous in our lounge for almost 10 days!

Now, you may ask what this has to do with the tip of the month.
Well, with the note on the cart were some pieces of paper with a suggestion as how to treat your sunflowers.
I thought other people might be interested so here it is;
How to care for cut sunflowers

  • Leave the elastic around the stems, it keeps the bunch together
  • Cut the stems to size at an angle
  • Put the cut stems in hot water (80C or so) for 30 seconds
  • Fill a vase half full with water and add two or three drops of chlorine (Javel)
  • Don’t forget to check the water regularly because sunflowers are very thirsty!

As said before; ours lasted almost 10 days!

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Questions and Answers


This month we are just publishing some of the many requests we receive from our readers all over the world.

If you have an answer for these people please mail them?

 



QUESTION

I want to know if you can help me with the following.
I have a no: 3 Potjie and I want to get a stand that I can put on my Weber charcoal grill.
I can find the big tripods that can be used over an open fire but nowhere can I find a smaller stand.
Can someone help me?

Michael Swanepoel
mswanepoel@redflex.com

 



QUESTION

I am looking for the Grabauw wors recipe.

Joe Illes
Joe.Illes@wdgh.nhs.uk

(If anyone finds this recipe please let us have it as well?-Ed)

 



QUESTION

As a child growing up in S.A., my father would bring home something he called, “Russian Sausage”.
Much to my health conscious mother’s horror he would deep-fry this wonderful treat.
I recall it to be reddish in color, with a bit or sourness to it.
Could anyone please tell me where I can get some or perhaps a recipe, and if it is the correct name.

Shoubee Liaw
USA
shliaw@seattleschools.org

(We have had this one before but it keep popping up and we have not yet had an answer to it-Ed)

 



Here are some of the answers we received the past month to the question below.

How does one make kosher Biltong?

ANSWERS

I could not find a recipe for Kosher Biltong although it can be bought at www.biltong.net
It seems that, in order for the meat to be kosher, it must be soaked in cold water for half an hour. I would presume after that it can be dried as normal.

Johan

 



Hi Lo,

In your newsletter this month Janine asked about kosher biltong. Biltong is kosher if your meat is kosher and your kitchen is kosher. I use shoulder clod (what’s that?-Ed) which gives me smaller pieces which has its advantages, quicker drying and a greater area for spice (coriander) adhesion.

Isa
(Israel)

 



Hi Biltong Team!

Making Kosher biltong is simple.
All you need are “Kosher” ingredients.
Those that follow the Kosher dietary laws will know the rules.
However, for those that are not clear, it is quite easy.

 

  • Firstly, the meat must be bought from a butcher or supermarket that has the necessary certification that the meat is indeed kosher.
  • Then be sure that all the ingredients also have the necessary certification that they are Kosher.
  • Finally, all the vessels, implements etc. must be kosher and that’s it!

A small warning though – there are different levels of “kosher”. So if you are planning to make kosher biltong for someone else, you would be advised to check with them first.

Kind regards,
Arnold

(Thanks a lot to all of you-Ed)

 



Hallo daar,

Ons het ‘n website gemaak vir Suid-Afrikaners en belangstellendes vir Suid-Afrika. Wil julle asb. ons link op julle website plaas of in julle volgende nuusbrief.

Baie dankie,
Riesa Lehmann

(If you can’t read Afrikaans, let me know then I can try to write to you in English)

(Afrikaans, English, Dutch, Double Dutch, German, French, Chinese or any other language. We always manage to read and understand it somehow -Ed)

Here is the link:
http://www.suidafrikanersinnederland.nl

(One question though Riesa; what is the old South African flag doing on your web site. I thought that we were way past that or are some of us still living in the past?-Ed)

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Recipe corner


Potjiekos

We still get so many requests for a Biltong Potjiekos that we are giving it here again.
This one is from Manna uit die Boland!

Biltong Potjiekos

 

  • Braai 6 uie en sampioene in swartpot tot gaar (oor kole).
  • Voeg ½ kg se gesnyde nat beesbiltong by. Sprinkel so ‘n handvol daaroor.
  • Kook intussen jou pak noodles (ek gebruik gekleurde skroefnoedels) gewoonweg op die stoof.
  • Gooi helfte van noedels bo-op biltong.
  • Dan weer die res van die noedels en die res van die biltong.
  • Sprinkel een gekapte green pepper bo-op asook 1 blikke pitmielies (NIE die romerige een nie) bo-op.
  • Gooi 2 houertjies vars room bo-oor en dan baie, baie gerasperde cheddar kaas.
  • Sit die deksel op en laat dit stadig prut tot die kaas gesmelt het.
  • Dit neem rerig nie lank nie.
  • Eet dadelik.

Dis regtig ‘n uitstekende resep.

(Anyone wanting this recipe in English please mail the editor)

 


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Around the World


From the far Outback
(somewhere near the entrance to the Great Barrier Reef)

By Nico Botha

Welcome to our part of Australia!

Hi to all the readers, “vrinne” and “tjommies” around the world!

Living in Australia is great, but it has its shortfalls. If you need a kg (kaygee) of Biltong or Boerewors over a weekend then you better wish for a miracle, or a fellow South African to knock on your door with what you need!!

That happened to us!

I am a rebel, went backpacking in the UK and Europe, stayed 10 years in London, met and married an Aussie and returned to the “Homeland” in 1997 with Skippy(wife) and our four year old daughter Caitlin. We had lots of South African friends in London and Caitlin cut her first tooth and most of the rest, on biltong and droe wors.

She had never been to South Africa and, when we went, the excitement blew her away. To visit Ouma and the rest of her African family! She spoke Afrikaans with a real “rooinek” accent too!!

We stayed in South Africa in a coastal village named Ndlambe, on the banks of the Kowie river, for four years. We still say that was the best time of our lives! Danielle gave birth to our son named Cieron Nico on 01/01/1999 in Port Elizabeth. A real little boerklong with kaalvoete, a “kettie” and a pocketknife! Cieron took two years to overcome the move from South Africa to Australia and he still has a kettie and a pocketknife and “hunts” possums, wallabies and wombats with his Shi-Tzu dog named Choc-Chip Muffin!

We left South Africa to settle in Australia in September 2001 and moved from Wollongong to Ayers Rock in the middle of the Outback were nothing happened till the South Africans arrived and clicked with 5 more South Africans! Yes!, I saw a massive loop and started making Biltong, Boerewors and Potbrood. I used kangaroo and camel meat and it’s so lean and soft and tasty that we all just loved it! I even used the meat for biltong. So close to kudu you cannot believe it!
There are more camels in the Australian Outback than in all the Arabic countries!

Sunset in the outback
Sunset in the outback
After months of having our children at the resort, and the impact of complete isolation, we decided it would be in their interest to live in a community were they will have the freedom to develop as real kids. Cieron and I participated in a project of trapping feral cats at night as they wiped out quite a few marsupial types.
They estimate that the outback has over a million feral cats running havoc and killing the indigenous marsupials. Apart from the Dingo there are no other predators in the Australian wildlife.
We handed in our resignations, packed our bags, hitched our Buzzard Off Road Trailer from Durban, and started our epic journey to Far North Queensland.

This trip took us 6 days of traveling through the Northern Territory, and the Queensland Outback, and sleeping on the side of the road in our South African 4×4 bush trailer. We arrived in Airlie Beach after a total of 2437 kilometers on dirt and single lane roads!

The potholes at one stage were so big you need a GPS to find your way out!
The kids loved this trip. They love nature and lots of stars at night! We even saw satellites moving from east to west and north to south. The best were the wishes from the kids on seeing shooting stars!

The Great Barrier Reef is a natural barrier between the mainland and the outer sea, and this has an effect on the waves rolling in. We have none, and we miss the waves of the African coastline to swim, surf and play in. “Die water is plat soos ‘n dam” but absolute crystal clear right down to the bottom! Did you know the Great Barrier Reef can be seen by the astronauts from space! This is a big country, ask the pommies!!

We have been here in the Whitsunday’s for a year now and we have met so many South Africans and “When we’s” (Zimbabweans). Our network of friends and work colleagues is growing by the day!

We get together on a daily or weekly basis or for a quick visit and even make our own Boerewors and Biltong!

Saturdays when all the locals go to our street market for the week’s supply of fresh veggies, the “manne” will get together for a wors making session. We do in many ways look after our friends, as it is vital in a new country to keep ties.

My mother can make “melktert” but that of Louise Basson, a teacher here at the Christian School, is just as good!
Louise and her husband left South Africa many years ago and lived in Kiwi land were she gave birth to their son Otto. Keep that name in the back of your head for years to come, as he will be a hit with all three the Tri-Nations Countries as he can represent all three!
I think SARFU should sign him asap!

The Airlie Beach man made Lagoon
It is dangerous to swim in the ocean here in the Whitsunday’s. The stingers (jellyfish) float around the islands in the water and if they sting you, you can die!
Don’t worry, I did not know that till we arrived here! The dive on the Great Barrier Reef is so fantastic it’s like a visit to the Kruger National Park. They protect the fish resources so well that they will have fish stock for generations to come!

We braai and play here!!

The bushfire awareness is so high here in Australia that in many parts of the country they have total fire bans in summer. That means no open or gas fires so no braaivleis or a “tjop” or six, or a T Bone or a Rump with a lekker double layer of angina medicine attached to it!

My Aussie mates have now discovered the “South African thick sausages” and they all prefer it with a wood smoke flavor to it! Even the word “Lekker” comes from the Aussie mouth! What next!

This part of Queensland is very fertile and Danielle gave birth to our second son Cianan Pieter on 07/06/04 ! What makes this more special is that a friend, a South African doctor did the delivery and she is also a Botha! Now I am ready for the Big Snip! (Kapater) (Read about it next month!)

Its time to say goodbye

In my heart we will always be South Africans with our own traditions and ethnic values. Even the teachers at the school notice that!

Thank you for the opportunity to share my “new” homeland with all of you!

If you are ever in Australia just “pop in”. We are only 2470 kilos (klicks as the Aussies say!) from Sydney!

Mooi loop!

Nico, Danielle and the kids Botha

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Smile a While


Dead Hair?

A man is driving along a highway and sees a hare jump out across the middle of the road. He swerves to avoid hitting it, but unfortunately the hare jumps right in front of the car.

The driver, a sensitive man as well as an animal lover, pulls over and gets out to see what has become of the hare. Much to his dismay, the hare is dead. The driver feels so awful that he begins to cry.

A beautiful blonde woman driving down the highway sees the man crying on the side of the road and pulls over. She steps out of the car and asks the man about his problem.

“I feel terrible,” he explains “I accidentally hit this hare and killed it.”

The blonde says, “Don’t worry.” She runs to her car and pulls out a spray can. She walks over to the limp, dead hare, bends down, and sprays the contents onto the hare.
The hare jumps up, waves its paw at the two of them and hops off down the road. Ten meters away the hare stops, turns around and waves again, he hops down the road another ten meters, turns and waves, hops another ten meters, turns and waves, and repeats this again and again and again, until he hops out of sight.

The man is astonished. He naturally asks the woman, “What’s in that can? What did you spray on that hare?”

The blonde woman turns the can around so that the man can read the label.

It said ……..

“Hair spray – Restores life to dead hair, adds permanent wave.”

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SportTalk


The drought is finally over. The Bokke are champions again!
Last month we wrote that the Springbokke were on the brink of greatness.
And how right we were!
What a nail biting game it was! We were at Derek and Jeanine’s house in Schoten having a braai and celebrating Derek’s birthday.
What a game!

Here is what I read just after the game. I am sure that most of us will agree with this.



By Stephen Nell, Jacques van der Westhuizen and Tamlynn Johannes

Springbok coach Jake White said: “I woke up the Sunday morning after the finals and I realised the victory had not yet sunk in. I thought that it might take a few days before I come to terms with the fact we are Tri-Nations champions!

“I know this team is full of potential and talent, but to be honest they surpassed even my expectations in terms of the time they’ve taken to develop into a winning combination. It’s just been unbelievable. I didn’t think it would happen so quickly,” said White.

“It was the biggest game of some of these players’ lives.

‘I didn’t think it would happen so quickly’ Australia had vastly experienced combinations. We have played only eight tests together. Already we have seen the value of keeping players together.”

Assistant coach Allister Coetzee described it as a “fairytale come true”.

“Nobody gave us a chance when we started. The way in which Jake has transformed the team into one big unit is amazing. We have had consistency of selection and a solid game plan,” he said.

Vice-captain De Wet Barry was equally excited: “Words can’t describe it. It has been a while since we have been successful. It feels awesome. This will do wonders for the game in South Africa. People believe in the success of the green and gold again.”

Players from the Western Cape were in high spirits when they arrived home on Sunday afternoon fresh from their Tri-Nations triumph.

‘People believe in the success of the green and gold again’ They were greeted with loud cheering and applause from a crowd of family, friends and fans when they arrived at Cape Town International Airport.

Bolla Conradie, Joe van Niekerk, Breyton Paulse along with Eddie Andrews, De Wet Barry and Marius Joubert were all happy to be back in Cape Town.

They enjoyed the win and especially the celebrations after the match.

“We are in such high spirits as a team. It’s just a great feeling to win and so we had real reason to celebrate,” Barry said.

Van Niekerk said: “We as a team got together and just had a blast. We had a nice time relaxing and absorbing the win.
“We had some beer and there was champagne.” Marius Joubert said that he had a great after-party with the team.
“We had beers and just celebrated. We just enjoyed the moment,” Joubert said.

Conradie and Andrews opted for a quiet night rather than partying up a storm.

Asked how it felt winning the trophy, Barry said: “It is so great. It’s been a while since we’ve had success for the green and gold. This is very special for me and I know it must be for the whole country.”

The players have little time to rest as they start training on Monday along with the rest of the Western Province team for the Currie Cup tournament.

Jean de Villiers said Clyde Rathbone must be feeling sorry that he turned his back on South Africa.
De Villiers said: “I am sure Clyde is feeling sorry now. You can say what you want, but you don’t forget your roots in the space of a year.
“But he did show a lot of character. He came to say congratulations, which I thought was very nice.”

(This article was originally published on page 1 of Cape Times on August 23, 2004-Ed)

 



-Where can you watch rugby on TV?-
Click here to find out where in most countries!

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The Competition


The winner of the August Competition

The winner of the August competition is Shelly McClean from Edinburgh in Scotland!

Congratulations Shelly, your Cadac Skottel Braai is on its way to you. There should be some warm weather left this summer (what summer?) to have a barbecue or two!



Remember the following:

 

  • The monthly draw or competition is totally free to everyone.
  • You can enter as many times as you like.
  • You can only enter via the Competition link on our home page or by clicking here
  • All prizes are sent to the winners free of charge.

 

The prize for the September Competition

The winner for the competition for September 2004 will receive one the best prizes ever!

A Falkirk size 3 Potjie Pot!

Click here to see a picture of it on the competition page!

To enter the competition all you have to do is to visit our home page at www.biltongmakers.com and click on one of the two competition links.

The winners of all competitions are notified by email.

Some of the other prizes for the year

 

  • Biltongmakers
  • Biltong spices
  • Boerewors spices
  • Braai tool sets
  • Potjie Pots
  • Barbecues
  • Cadac Skottel Braais and………. much, much more!!!

 

So, don’t wait!

You can enter right now by clicking on the competition link on our home page.

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A free Biltong Maker!


It’s easy to earn a free Biltong Maker!

As a South African orientated web site we are constantly looking to contact more and more South Africans across the world.
Not only to tell them about how they can make their own Biltong but also to give them a chance to share their stories with other South Africans the world over.

So, here is your chance to help us.

If you know about a South African family or friend living near you or perhaps somewhere far away, why not tell them about us and then us about them.
Perhaps you can send us their email address so that we can mail them a copy of this newsletter.
If they like it they can stay on the mailing list, if not they can just let us know and we will remove them.

If the response we receive is large enough and, directly due to your efforts people place orders with us, you could be rewarded by receiving one of our products totally free of charge.

What an easy way to perhaps get your own Home Biltong Maker without having to pay a cent for it!

You can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com

During August many people went to the trouble once again of submitting their friend’s and family’s names and we would like to thank all!

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Let’s hear from you!


Help us to make it even better!

Many people are subscribing to this newsletter every day. Mostly they do so because they enjoy reading it and like to hear from people in other parts of the world.

If you are one of our subscribers why don’t you write something yourself?

Just like you enjoy reading about what other people are up to, they might enjoy reading about you and your family.
Why not put pen to paper (or fingers to the keyboard!), and tell us about anything interesting. About life in your part of the world, what you do and how you live. Perhaps something that happened to you.
You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask.

Perhaps you have some advice to give?
You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Of course it does not have to be about Biltong or food. Anything that is of interest is welcome!
Share it with other people around the world!

It would be so nice to hear from you!

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Boerewors in the Benelux


Boeries galore!!

We have just made two new batches of 120kg each so there is ample stock.
Click to me me bigger
The price is € 8.50 per kilogram for the smaller quantities under 50kg. Over 50kg it is € 7.00 when you come and fetch in Keerbergen and € 7.50 if we deliver to you. (Benelux only)

Please keep in mind that we also do Boerewors rolls and Potjiekos for up to 100 people as well as “Lamb-on-the-Spit” for functions. So if you are planning anything please let us know?

Interested parties can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com for details or phone us at +32 (16) 53.96.25.

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Potjie Pots in the Benelux

Click to me me bigger

We have two of the size 4 Potjie Pots left.

For those who are interested please call us at +32 (16) 53.96.25

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Previous issues of this Newsletter

 

You can click on the links below to view some of the previous issues of our newsletter.

June 2003
July 2003
August 2003
September 2003
October 2003
November 2003
December 2003
Jan/Feb 2004
March 2004
April 2004
May 2004
June 2004
July 2004
August 2004
September 2004
October 2004


Subscribing and unsubscribing
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Perhaps you would like to subscribe to this newsletter or tell a friend about Biltongmakers.Com! and the incredible Biltong Makers!!
You can be included in this newsletter by clicking on the following link.
Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

If you prefer not to receive email from us, you can unsubscribe from Biltongmakers.Com! by clicking on this link.
Unsubscribe me please.

August 2004

The Newsletter
August 2004

You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
If you do not wish to receive this newsletter you may unsubscribe at the bottom where you will find an automatic link. Your name will then be permanently deleted from our database.
If you, your family or your friends want to subscribe to the newsletter please click on this link. Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

In this Newsletter

Just click on any of the subjects to jump straight to it

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From the editor

Keerbergen
Belgium
August 4, 2004

Hello everyone,

My apologies for being a bit late this month. There just seems to be too little time in a day to get everything done.

Here we go.

Last month I started a whole new love affair!

I met Susie on July 6 and have been head over heels in love with her ever since.

Susie goes with me wherever I go and, as some people I sometimes have in the car at times, she does not nag and is not a “back-seat driver”

I must admit that she is pretty forceful and keeps on reminding me where to go and what to do. But I don’t mind really. At least she is a good map-reader and gets me where I have to go much quicker than in the past.

The first time I took Susie with me was when I had to go to Strassburg in France. She told me that she knew the way and that I should listen to her.

So I did!

We got there in double quick time but on the way back she really got us lost. We must have driven about 150km more than we should have. Perhaps it was me who faithfully did what I was told.

After that trip I decided to take her with me to bed and practise a little so that we would not have that same problem again.

And June doesn’t even mind.

Because Susie is my new GPS!

It’s the original magic! Those of you who have one must agree that once you start using it you can’t do without it.

When I leave home I just tell her where to go and when we are almost there she will tell me (in a rather nice voice) “You have arrived at your destination”!

It is amazing to think that one of the first computers I worked with had a 30Mb hard drive. That was big in those days and I was extremely proud of it.

Now I have this little chip in Susie, no bigger that my thumb and that holds 256Mb!

It is a bit scary to think that every single street in the whole of Europe is on that little chip. Even down to the street numbers! Every single one!

So, I will carry on with my love affair.

Suzie is magic!

(But she does not cook the way Junie does – no way!)

 



This month will see the birth of our brand-new invention.

The “BILTONG BUDDY” Home Biltong Maker.

It was time to upgrade (or replace) the Traditional Biltong Maker and, after months of work, it is finally here!

The “BILTONG BUDDY” has a number of distinct advantages over the previous model.

One of the major advantages is that it is much lighter and it will therefore cost a lot less to mail! The mailing charges have always been a major factor in deciding whether or not to buy a Biltong maker. It sometimes costs more to ship the machine than the price of the machine itself!

With the “BILTONG BUDDY” this will change quite drastically. It could make a difference of as much as R 200.00 on the total price.

We also decided to go back to the good old faithful light bulb. It is so much easier to replace a globe than to change an element.
The “BILTONG BUDDY” uses only a 15-watt globe. This means that the power consumption is almost 1/3 than that of its bigger brother, Rockey’s New Age Home Biltong maker!

The “BILTONG BUDDY” is available right now!

The price?

The first 100 units will go for only R 490.00!
That is a price we last had in 1999!

You can now order the BILTONG BUDDY and take advantage of this special introductory offer.
(The first 63 units were sold as at 22-08-2004)

 



We are finally having a summer here in Belgium. Temperatures are in the upper 20s and have even been as high as 38C.

Even though we are not lovers of extreme heat it is nice to feel some sun on our bodies for a change. Perhaps we have a late summer this year.

Well, that is it again for this month.

We have a couple of very nice contributions this month. The regular “Saffies-Down-under” column from Craig Rudolph and also a very exciting recipe from Nico Botha, also from Australia!

More from Nico next month – That’ll be something to read!

Have a good month and till the next newsletter,

Lo

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Food for thought


I have it on very good authority that the following story is true.

On the 17th of November, 1930, the Chicago Herald Examiner printed a story about an argument between a man and his wife. The headline read: “Man Spites His Wife by Staying Blindfolded in Bed for Seven Years”.

This is the story;

Harry Havers lived in Indiana. He was the kind of husband who liked to help around the house – hang pictures, do the washing-up, dust and polish the furniture, and so on. One day his wife complained about the way he was doing something.

She reckoned there was a better way to do it.

Harry disagreed. He told her, “All right. If that’s the way you feel, I’m going to bed. I’m going to stay there the rest of my life. And I don’t want to see you or anyone else again.” So he went to bed, with a blindfold over his eyes, and stayed there for seven years. He only got up because he had begun to feel uncomfortable. The mattress, he said, was lumpy.

I have so many questions about this story. For example – who brought him food and drink during those seven years?

His wife? More fool she if she did. Did anyone ever change the bed linen? Did he ever change his pyjamas? Or his blindfold? How did he go to the loo? (He must have gone to the loo. ) And most important of all – how did he stay mad at his wife for seven years? Didn’t he get bored? Or did he have a bedside radio?

Did neither of them think to apologize?

Did they even speak to one another? Why did his wife stay around?

I think you’ll agree that a seven-year huff is quite a huff. It’s also a total waste of a life.

Forgiveness isn’t an option – it’s a necessity.

If we’re going to be free to get on with living our lives, that is.

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What’s in a name?


What’s for breakfast?

Kelloggs Corn Flakes? Post-Toasties?

With all of the choices in the supermarket cereal aisle today, many of them packed with sugar, artificial colours and flavours, and far from healthful, you may be surprised to learn that breakfast cereal was originally created as a health food!

In the late 1800s, most Americans had a diet heavy in meat and very low in fibre. Relatively little was known about nutrition, but a few innovators did recognize the connection between diet and wellbeing.

One of these people was Dr. John Harvey Kellogg of Battle Creek, Michigan.

A member of the Seventh Day Adventist church, which promoted an alcohol and meat-free diet, Dr. Kellogg ran the church-backed Battle Creek Sanitarium, where wealthy clients would come to rest and improve their health through a strict diet and exercise program.
Some of the sanitarium’s treatments, such as dunks into pools of electrified water seem a bit odd today, but in terms of nutrition, Dr. Kellogg was surprisingly on the mark.

As meat and coffee were off limits, Dr. Kellogg was constantly looking for wholesome alternatives that tasted good too. One day, as he and his brother William, the sanitarium’s business manager, were experimenting with new ways to prepare wheat, they discovered that it could be rolled into flakes.

The patients loved the results.

He gladly sold his new cereal to former patients but Dr. Kellogg had no interest in marketing it to the general public. One of his patients, an inventor named Charles William Post, opened his own institute and health food company in Battle Creek upon leaving the Sanitarium.

It is thanks to Post’s genius for advertising, Post Grape-Nuts and Post-Toasties led the cereal game early on.

In 1906, William Kellogg broke away from his brother and founded the Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flake Company, which later became the Kellogg Company. Although at one time as many as 44 cereal companies were operating in Battle Creek, none could compete with Post or Kellogg.

100 years later, the cereal you eat is still likely to come from one of these two companies.

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Our Home Biltong Makers


The all new “BILTONG BUDDY” is here and available for immediate shipping!!

For the past couple of months we have been working hard on a very exciting project and the time has come to tell you all about it!

We are proudly announcing the arrival of our latest addition!

We are calling it ‘The “BILTONG BUDDY”“!

Why? Well, we believe that this new Home Biltong maker will be a “BUDDY” to all people who love their Biltong and have found it too expensive to buy a Home Biltong Maker of their own! Until now that is!

The “BILTONG BUDDY” is the answer!!

Our new ‘BILTONG BUDDY’ Home Biltong Maker has some distinct advantages over the old Traditional 2-kg model. These advantages are:

  • No more element; it uses a 15 watt globe.
    • This means that you will no longer have to buy spare elements and the power consumption is only one third of what the old model used!
  • The “BILTONG BUDDY” is made of a rigid PST, just like its brother, Rockey’s New Age Biltong maker.
    • This means that it is much lighter in weight which means a lot less mailing charges!!
  • The new “BILTONG BUDDY” dries meat in less than 4 days!
    • This means that you can now make more Biltong than ever before!
  • And last, but certainly not least, it will cost ONLY R 490.00!!*
    • This means that we are back to prices charged in 1999!

So, lets summarize:

  • A lighter machine means less mailing charges!
  • A lower price means that more people can afford it!
  • Lower power consumption also means less cost to you!

You can order the new BILTONG BUDDY now by going to our order page or you can have a look at it first.

Details of the New “BILTONG BUDDY” can be found here.

More and more people are into making larger batches of Biltong at one time. Rockey’s New Age 5kg Biltong maker is just ideal for that purpose!

Details on Rockey’s machine can be found by clicking on this link.

*(For the first 100 units)

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This month’s special offer !

We will keep one price as it is.

We will keep the present price of the RNA-5kg Home Biltong maker as it is till the end of August.
This is a definite deadline and we cannot extend it any further.
So, those people who have not made use of the offer, you have another 3 weeks and a bit!

 


 

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Suggestion of the month


An OBE for making Boerewors!

This one from Nico Botha from somewhere in the far Outback of Australia!
(The entrance to the Great Barrier Reef and Islands!!)

We all have our own reasons for moving away from the Homeland !

This is my reason.

It is my humble belief that the changes in South Africa were placed upon us as a nation to migrate to the corners of this world, to share the Boerewors tradition with the less fortunate ones and to enlighten them to one of the wonders of our world!

Our Boerewors Cult is as ancient as the Haggis in Scotland or the Black Pudding and Bloodwurst in Germany!

It is just incredible to see what great satisfaction and pleasure Boerewors can bring to a BBQ where “Snags” (Aussie word for sausages) and tasteless bleak looking efforts of Worsie Types have roamed the braai fires and gas grills around the world for centuries!

It is my mission to say:

“Well done to all the Boerewors Makers around the world!!
You all should be honored in the 2005 Queens Birthday speech for an OBE!!”

 


ORDER OF THE BOEREWORS EMPIRE



“You have done well!
We are a force to be to be reckoned with!
We have spread something De Klerk or Tutu or PW Botha, Hertzog, or Verwoerd never thought was possible!

Perhaps the International Boerewors Recipe Encyclopedia should be invented, and a BA at Unisa should be considered!
With a Masters for research on Boerewors!

(Jislaaik Nico! What an idea!-Ed)

(For those who are interested have a look at Nico’s Boerewors recipe a bit further on!!-Ed)

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Questions and Answers


Every month we receive many questions from people all over the world. These questions may be about making Biltong, Boerewors or Potjiekos but can also be totally unrelated to these subjects.

 


 

The following question is asked a lot and we have tried to answer it as well as possible.
However, perhaps there are some of our readers who have different thoughts on this.

Anyone out there who might want to help?

QUESTION

Hi there Biltong Team,

I was wondering if one could use another cut of beef than silverside. I don’t enjoy fighting with the food I’m eating and I find the silverside I tried recently, very sinewy.
Is there another cut I could use and still get the same result?

I am also thinking of trying the following spice mixture; 3/6 Coriander, 1/6 Salt, 1/6 Ground Pepper, 1/6 Chilli Powder.
What are your thoughts? Has anyone tried that combination and what were the results? I generally like very strong biltong (my girlfriend actually likes it even more) so what would be the best spice mixture that I could use?

Regards
Latimore Clayton

ANSWER

Making food is something very personal.

People make it the way they like it. I for instance like lots of spices. Other people don’t. Play around with the spice mix you mentioned but, whatever you do, always use vinegar. The Worcestershire sauce you can leave out but the vinegar, apart from the taste, also acts as a preservative.

Brown sugar is a must. The mixture of salt and sugar gives the biltong its unique taste. But then again, that’s me. Perhaps other people don’t use sugar.

As far as the silverside is concerned I am at a loss. Proper silverside comes from right next to the rump steak and should have little or no sinews at all. I have made excellent biltong using soup meat but the best is of course rump steak. Any cut of beef from the hind quarter is fine. When you buy your meat you can actually see if it has a lot of sinew or not.

 



QUESTION

I was born in Western Australia and I am hooked on Biltong, Boerewors and Droëwors.

I shared a house in East Acton, LONDON in the late 1970’s with 3 South African girls. Their names were Stephanie Bensimon, Linda Wilkinson and Sally Rowney.

Sally’s Mum introduced me to Biltong. I have been hooked ever since, and have introduced many Aussie yachtsmen to the virtues of Biltong!

Another friend from South Africa, an ex SA Moto-X (Moto Cross) Champion, Graham Greene (he rode Maico’s) also became an exceptional friend of mine back here in Perth, Western Austrralia.

I am hoping that, through your contacts, you may be able to put me in contact with some of these people, particularly Stephie and Graham, no disrespect to Sally and Linda, because we had one hell of a time, Sally should remember the BARRY WHITE Concert we attended.

Thank you,
Wayne Drake
wdrake@iinet.net.au

ANSWER

We don’t have an answer to that one Wayne. But is there anyone out there who can help Wayne? If so, please email him at the address just below his name.

 



QUESTION

Can you make kosher biltong?

Thanks
Janine

ANSWER

Does anyone have the proper and correct answer for Janine? Please mail us if you do because we often get asked this question.-Ed

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Recipe corner


Here is Nico Botha’s Boerewors recipe.
(You remember Nico from earlier on? The one from the far Outback?)

It looks fascinating!!

Boerewors Queensland

I have been living here in Aussie for a few years now. Boerewors is a must for our family as we are addicted to our Heritage.

I would like to share this recipe with all of you and I am sure it will be a winner with a lot of Boertjies around the world !!!!

My meat selection

 

  • 5 kg rump (lekker cheap here in Far North Queensland)
  • 5 kg mutton (lekker medium vet skaap)
  • 5 kg Pork (no fat)
  • 1.5 gr Bacon shanks – cut and diced into cubes

Mince all the rump, mutton and “varkie” into a grade courser than your normal mince, only once. Mince the bacon cubes.

My spices

 

  • 100 ml salt (Sea salt)
  • 75 ml of Coriander roasted in the oven.
  • 5-8 ml of cloves
  • 30 ml McCormick Bush Spices (This is an Aussie all purpose spice mix)
  • 12 ml of nutmeg powder
  • 35 ml of Seasoned Black pepper (fine)

Blend coriander, salt, cloves, and Bush spices to a fine spice mixture add Seasoned Black Pepper. Mix well.

My wet stuff.

  • 625 ml of vintage Balsamic vinegar
  • 2-3 tots of Klipdrift Brandy ! If available, or Napoleon Brandy (The Aussie equvalent to “Klippies”

My life treasure “Boere geheime”

  • 6x Sweet Over ripe Queensland Tomatoes “soet tamaties”!
  • 4x Large Australian Brown onions.
  • 4x Garlic cloves

Blend the “Boere Geheime” (top secret) into a pulp and add all the spices and wet stuff to the pulp. Mix well and rest the pulp for 20 minutes. If you love green onions, cut 5 of these onions into thin bits, add them to the meat and let it rest!
This is optional !

Now, add the pulp to the meat, mix well and rest the mixture for 30 minutes.
Stick a patty in the pan, taste, smile, have a beer, crack a joke, tell a jagstorie or two, or a fishing story!
After all we live in Barramundi country up here!!

Your casings must be well soaked from the night before, wash them well.

Unpack your bit of “Africana”, your worsstopper from back home, en laat waai!!

This is a winner braai after braai !

 



Droë wors!!

Do not add the tomatoes, onions, or garlic or green onions to meat mixture.
Do not over stuff skins be gentle!!!

 



Just an idea

The Aussies love a gas BBQ.
To add a woodfire flavour to your next gas braai, stick a stainless steel bakkie with a few wood chips under the grill to create smoke from under the meat !

Soak the wood chips in a port or red wine from the night before. The flavour is magic !!
The wood smell gets now into the boerewors and Bobs your Uncle!
Instant Smokey boerewors!
(Like the real thing in times of a total fire ban here in Australia!)

OK Mate

Now you have my life secret!!

This is a receipe that will bring tears to your eyes when you and your mates sit in the shed checking the Tri-Nations on the kassie and having a “sluk” of a cold one with a Boerewors roll in the other hand!

Mooi loop!

Nico

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Around the World


Saffies Down-Under

Here I sit with tears in my Kangaroo stew, wondering what might have been if the Bokke could only have held on for those extra 30 seconds in Christchurch.

Oh what if??

But they were very impressive. For the first time since Mallet’s days things look together and the team look like they actually know what they are doing. I look forward to Perth and the Wallabies.

Something that has again shown its ugly head here in Australia are the cheats that proliferate all walks of the sports-field. I think the saying goes, “People should not throw stones if they live in glass houses.” And is that not so very true of the Australian landscape at the moment. It is all so very easy when other nations are caught with positive drug results and banned substances, but it gets extremely quiet when one of their own gets nabbed.

Ben Tune springs to mind. Shane Warne yet another and now Shaun Eadie.
Most will not know this man, but he is a Gold Medal hope in cycling for the upcoming Olympics. However, he was said to have been importing “growth hormones” as far back as 1999. This they inject and one does not have to be a brain surgeon to know why. Nothing was done and he has now been cleared to go and partake in the games.

Similarly, several elite Australian athletes have also tested positive, but due to the American style suing and counter suing that goes on here, the authorities are reluctant to take any action lest they be sued in return. What a load of “double standards.” If it were any other country, there would be the obligatory whinging. But again I move on ……

Ah the Olympics – and the “Best Games ever,” still rings in the media and the corridors of Sydney everywhere. They were great, and sure the city was enormously jovial and all that good stuff. But the media here are having a field day with the expectation that Athens will not be ready. It will be incomplete and there will be trouble beyond belief. There is almost a hope, from some quarters here, that it does fall into a pile and that things do go wrong.

But let me tell you about some of the things that were never mentioned about the Sydney games.

  • There was once a promise made (I forget to whom it was made, probably the Olympic committee) that the “Millennium Train” would be built in time for the Sydney games. It was to be at the fore-front of design and solve the problems of the past. Trains on time etc and plenty of them. It is now 2004, and the train has yet to be fully unveiled and used on the Sydney rail network. It does not work and it has cost the taxpayer twice the original budget. Best games ever – yes sure.
  • All the wonderful Olympic stadiums that were built for the games, now sit mostly idle costing the tax payer a cool AU$56 million a year. Not very successful to me.

Although the rains have started to arrive here in Sydney the dams, unfortunately, have not really been filled to any greater or lesser extent.
Water restrictions continue and the good life proliferates. Winter has also finally made its cold appearance with snow in the mountains and the ski fields being over-run by season skiers. Every Friday, on the highway to the snow fields, the cars are lined for kilometers trying to get there.

Having grown up in a country that does not have much snow, the excitement still does not seem to hook into me yet when the locals chat and plan for the winter skiing holidays. I guess the same is true for any Saffies in Europe. But they do say once the bug bites….so maybe next time I will have tried the ski fields to see if it is as good as they claim.

So until next time – keep warm from the “Land Down-under.”

Craig Rudolph
Sydney, Australia

 



The following comes from Koen Verhaest from Antwerp, Belgium.

Racism

This scene took place on a BA flight between Johannesburg and London.

A white woman, about 50 years old, was seated next to a black man. Obviously disturbed by this, she called the air hostess.

“Madam, what is the matter,” the hostess asked. “You obviously do not see it then?” she responded. “You placed me next to a black man. I do not agree to sit next to someone from such a repugnant group. Give me an alternative seat.” “Be calm please,” the hostess replied. “Almost all the places on this flight are taken. I will go to see if another place is available.”
The Hostess went away and then came back a few minutes later. “Madam, just as I thought, there are no other available seats in the economy class. I spoke to the captain and he informed me that there is also no seat in the business class. All the same, we still have one place in the first class.”

Before the woman could say anything, the hostess continued. “It is not usual for our company to permit someone from the economy class to sit in the first class. However, given the circumstances, the captain feels that it would be scandalous to make someone sit next to someone sooooo disgusting”.

She turned to the black guy, and said, “Therefore, Sir, if you would like to, please collect your hand luggage, a seat awaits you in first class.”

At that moment, the other passengers who were shocked by what they had just witnessed, stood up and applauded.

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Smile a While


We had it all wrong about the crocodile so here is the truth

This is a real life exam of a Grade 5 (Std. 3) pupil. Primary School exam 1 of the 2nd term.
Write an essay on the following question: “What is a crocodile?
(Use block letters and write legibly)
Name: Gerhard Janse vanVuuren Date: Monday 22/05/2004

Answer:

 

  • The crokodile is a specially built so long because the flatter the better swimmer.
  • At the front of the crokodile is the head. The head exists almost only of teeth.
  • Behind the crokodile the tail grows.
  • Between the head and the tail is the crokodile. A crokodile without a tail is called a rotwieler.
  • A crokodile’s body is covered with handbag material. He can throw his tail off if he gets a fright but it doesn’t happen much because a crokodile is scared of nothing.
  • A crokodile stays under the water because if you were so ugly, you would also stay under the water. It is good that a crokodile stays under the water, because a person gets such a big fright if a crokodile catches you that he first has to rinse you off before he can eat you.
  • A crokodile isn’t hardly as dangerous as people say he is, except if he catches you. The longer he bites you, the more it hurts.
  • Very old crokodiles suck their people and buck that they catch dead.
  • If you eat him, he is a crokosatie.
  • A crokodile did not learn to swim with his arms so he uses his tail.
  • The little brother of the crokodile is a lizard.
  • The slow sister of the crocodile is a chameleon.
  • The gay brother of the Crokodile is a daffodile.
  • And the crokodile also has a dead brother the frikkidele.”


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SportTalk


Beaten Boks on brink of greatness, say rivals
By Trevor Robb
August 2, 2004

Perth, Australia – The Springboks flew out of Australia on Sunday with their Tri-Nations hopes all but shattered, but their reputation as one of the world’s rugby superpowers well and truly restored.

For the second time in as many matches the Springboks were denied a victory late in the match, this time going down 30-26 after former compatriot Clyde Rathbone dived over for a winning try to Australia in the 71st minute.

But the Wallabies were impressed by what they saw with both coach Eddie Jones and veteran captain George Gregan, who celebrated his 100th Test on Saturday, heaping praise on their new-look and comparatively inexperienced rivals and their coach Jake White.

 

‘They have got the right players in the side’ “I thought it was a high-quality game,” Gregan said.
“It was a high-tempo game. When they had the ball they really tried to maintain it and they played at a high skill level.


“I think Jake White needs to be complimented on that because the way they are playing is a very good style of football – very positive.”

Jones agreed, saying the difference between the top teams was marginal and getting closer.

“At some stage there’s going to be some realism about the differences between the top five teams in the world,” he said.

“It’s the teams that perform a certain number of plays well that will win the game.

“South Africa is certainly in that category. They have got the right players in the side.

“As George said they have been extremely well coached by Jake – they’re a lot fitter than they were – they’re a very, very good side.”

Jones said that over the next three years there would only be at most a two or threeper cent difference between the top teams which would determine the final outcome in any Test.

For the South Africans, Saturday’s loss was a bitter pill to swallow – doubly so because of their agonising last-second defeat by the New Zealand All Blacks in Christchurch in their opening TriNations match last week.

But both White and captain John Smit tried to focus on the positives, predicting the Springboks could win their remaining two matches at home and continue to improve.

“If you look and see where we were six weeks ago and see where we are now – it’s a huge step forward,” White said.

“We’re going home and I think if we can build on these two results back home in front of a 50,000 crowd supporting us there’s no reason we can’t turn the tables around and play even better.

“That’s a challenge we’ve got as a team… there are a lot of positives coming out of this tour.

“We won against the Pacific Islanders and lost narrowly in both (Tri-Nations) games – and you’re talking about the number one and number two sides in the world so it just shows you where we are.”

White said the Australians had more experience and Jones had had a core of 10 to 12 players working together with him for at least five years, both as coach of the Super 12 team ACT Brumbies and now as head of the Wallabies.

He said his own players had lacked composure at crucial times but experience would rectify the problems.

“It’s just one of those things,” he said.

“I think the inexperience of this young side… it’s something you can’t buy but if you look at what the Australians have got and how long they’ve been together it just shows you what sort of value there is in keeping a side together for a long time.”

Smit said it hurt to lose two close matches in as many weeks but the experience would motivate the players for their final two games in South Africa.

“I think the biggest thing is that we’ve really had opportunities to win both games and we’re so far from where we are going to be as well in terms of growing as a side together,” he said.

“The guys are really looking forward to playing at home and lifting and uniting.”

White refused to lay any blame for the defeat at the feet of English referee Chris White who missed what appeared to be a late tackle by Wallaby fullback Chris Latham on replacement back Gaffie du Toit with 13 minutes remaining.

Du Toit, who scored South Africa’s third try, kicked down the line and was charging towards the tryline when Latham shouldered him out of play, seemingly well after the ball was kicked.

“I thought the ref went quite well. You can’t blame him for all that. I think it was a call he had to make,” White said.

Despite the defeat, the Boks took a bonus point from the match for losing by fewer than seven points, to add to the bonus point they earned against the All Blacks.

But any faint hopes they may still have of winning the tournament now rest in the hands of their opponents – with Australia to meet New Zealand in Sydney next week.

Australia has five points – four from Saturday’s win plus a bonus point for scoring four tries in the match – while New Zealand has eight points after winning its opening two games.

The Springboks still have two home games to play.

 



-Where can you watch rugby on TV?-
Click here to find out where in most countries!

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The Competition


The winner of the July Competition

The winner of the July competition is Don Warren from Toronto in Canada.
This is the first time we have had a winner from Canada ever since we started the competition many moons ago.

Well done and congratulations Don, your Barbecue Utensil Kit is on its way to you. All you have to do when it arrives is to start using it!

Please let us know how you like it and perhaps send us a picture or two?

Remember the following:

 

  • The monthly draw or competition is totally free to everyone.
  • You can enter as many times as you like.
  • You can only enter via the Competition link on our home page or by clicking here
  • All prizes are sent to the winners free of charge.

 

The prize for the August Competition

The winner for the competition for August 2004 will receive one of the most popular prices we have been giving away the past couple of years.

The Cadac Skottel Braai!

Click here to see a picture of it on the competition page!

To enter the competition all you have to do is to visit our home page at www.biltongmakers.com and click on one of the two competition links.

The winners of all competitions are notified by email.

Some of the other prizes for the year

 

  • Biltongmakers
  • Biltong spices
  • Boerewors spices
  • Braai tool sets
  • Potjie Pots
  • Barbecues
  • Cadac Skottel Braais and………. much, much more!!!

 

So, don’t wait!

You can enter right now by clicking on the competition link on our home page.

 

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A free Biltong Maker!


It’s easy to earn a free Biltong Maker!

As a South African orientated web site we are constantly looking to contact more and more South Africans across the world.
Not only to tell them about how they can make their own Biltong but also to give them a chance to share their stories with other South Africans the world over.

So, here is your chance to help us.

If you know about a South African family or friend living near you or perhaps somewhere far away, why not tell them about us and then us about them.
Perhaps you can send us their email address so that we can mail them a copy of this newsletter.
If they like it they can stay on the mailing list, if not they can just let us know and we will remove them.

If the response we receive is large enough and, directly due to your efforts people place orders with us, you could be rewarded by receiving one of our products totally free of charge.

What an easy way to perhaps get your own Home Biltong Maker without having to pay a cent for it!

You can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com

During July many people went to the trouble once again of submitting their friend’s and family’s names and we would like to thank all!

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Let’s hear from you!


Help us to make it even better!

Many people are subscribing to this newsletter every day. Mostly they do so because they enjoy reading it and like to hear from people in other parts of the world.

If you are one of our subscribers why don’t you write something yourself?

Just like you enjoy reading about what other people are up to, they might enjoy reading about you and your family.
Why not put pen to paper (or fingers to the keyboard!), and tell us about anything interesting. About life in your part of the world, what you do and how you live. Perhaps something that happened to you.
You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask.

Perhaps you have some advice to give?
You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Of course it does not have to be about Biltong or food. Anything that is of interest is welcome!
Share it with other people around the world!

It would be so nice to hear from you!

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Boerewors in the Benelux


Boeries galore!!

As always during the summer months we have ample stock.
Click to me me bigger
Unfortunately we had a slight increase in the price of meat (we are paying for the fat now where this was free before) so, the price is € 8.50 per kilogram for the smaller quantities under 50kg. Over 50kg it is € 7.00 when you come and fetch in Keerbergen and € 7.50 if we deliver to you. (Benelux only)

Please keep in mind that we also do Boerewors rolls and Potjiekos for up to 100 people as well as “Lamb-on-the-Spit” for functions. So if you are planning anything please let us know?

Interested parties can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com for details or phone us at +32 (16) 53.96.25.

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Potjie Pots in the Benelux

Click to me me bigger

We still have a couple of size 4 Potjies left from the last consignment.

For those who are interested please call us at +32 (16) 53.96.25

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Previous issues of this Newsletter

 

You can click on the links below to view some of the previous issues of our newsletter.

June 2003
July 2003
August 2003
September 2003
October 2003
November 2003
December 2003
Jan/Feb 2004
March 2004
April 2004
May 2004
June 2004
July 2004
August 2004
September 2004
October 2004


Subscribing and unsubscribing
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Perhaps you would like to subscribe to this newsletter or tell a friend about Biltongmakers.Com! and the incredible Biltong Makers!!
You can be included in this newsletter by clicking on the following link.
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July 2004

The Newsletter
July 2004

You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
If you do not wish to receive this newsletter you may unsubscribe at the bottom where you will find an automatic link. Your name will then be permanently deleted from our database.
If you, your family or your friends want to subscribe to the newsletter please click on this link. Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

In this Newsletter

Just click on any of the subjects to jump straight to it

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From the editor

Keerbergen
Belgium
June 30, 2004

Hello everyone,

If you all had as good a month as we had you must feel great! It has been busy and in between all the work we also managed to put in some quality “playing” time.

About the middle of the month we went on a surprise visit to the UK.

It was about 4 am when we woke and started getting ready to drive down to Calais.

This was the weekend we decided to surprise June’s sister Carol and her husband Peter in a little town called Worthing, just east of Brighton in England.

Carol and Peter had moved down there only about three months ago from Cape Town.

We wanted to leave early in order to miss the peak hour traffic on the Brussels ring road. So, not before long we found ourselves on the E40 traveling towards Gent.

It was around 9 am when we arrived in Dunkirk where we wanted to get some goodies in Auchan, a supermarket we had discovered there where it is really not expensive to shop. At the same time we were going to collect a ring we bought for June on our last trip down to Dunkirk. It was too big and they would re-size it for us.

The jeweler was closed but Auchan was open and we bought some wine to take with us to the UK. It was only about € 8.50 for a 5 liter box of really good Rosé. That’s about R 65.00, the same price one pays in South Africa!

Soon we were on our way again from Dunkirk to Calais (about 30km) and found ourselves at the turnstiles for the Euro-Tunnel.

Arriving at the entrance to the Euro-Tunnel complex we found ourselves at a setup identical to the toll gates one finds on many roads. There they checked the printout from the computer reservation we had made, gave us our ticket and pointed us in the general direction of the platforms.

Before we went there we wanted to see (of course) how cheap the “Duty Free” shops would be. Not much to our surprise they were as expensive as most “Duty Free” shops around the world. Very expensive.

So, on to the platforms. Although our train was booked for 11.28 am we found out that we could go on any train as long as it was not full.

Driving down the platform we were shown into which carriage we could drive. These trains are huge double-decker monsters where you drive your car in through a huge door. Once you are inside they lower a door after each five cars so that in fact, there are five cars per compartment.

After a journey of about 35 minutes we found ourselves driving out (on the left side of the road this time!) on the England side at Folkestone.

From there we turned right and travelled the 20 or so kilometers (sorry 12.5 miles in England) to Dover. We wanted to see the White Cliffs and after a while found ourselves right on top where we had a cup of coffee in a little tea room.

Soon we were on our way again on the M25 in the direction of London where we would turn south towards Brighton.

But…..I had promised myself that, while in England, I was going to have a Wimpy! I am not a Wimpy fanatic but occasionally enjoyed my eggs, chips, bacon and sausage in Sandton City on a Saturday morning while shopping. I just needed a good old English breakfast, something you do not get in Europe, let alone a Wimpy!

The night before I had printed out all the possible Wimpy addresses along our route. So, low and behold we came to a town called Ashford, drove into the little village and found our Wimpy.

Now, to anybody who ever goes to the UK and want a Wimpy..DON’T!! It was terrible. It was just one big mess of grease and fat. Like they had dumped all the food on our plates from a deepfryer and then dished it up. So, £15.00 lighter (That’s about R 170.00!!) we left in disgust. They didn’t even blush when they presented us with their bill!

BIG MISTAKE!!!

Anyway, after a further pretty uneventful journey we found ourselves on the way to Worthing.

Now, those people who know me well. will tell you that I am a pretty thorough person. Everything must be “just so” and correct.
In true form I had printed out stacks of maps from the Internet with the route very carefully planned. However, upon entering Worthing we discovered that the only thing I did not have was the actual address!

So, on the phone and after a small little while lie story got the address from Carol.

We soon arrived at their seaside apartment and surprised them totally.

The coastal town of Worthing faces France across the English Channel and lies on the seaward slope of the South Downs, a line of chalk hills running across the SE corner of England. It has a population of almost 100,000 and is the largest town in the county of West Sussex.
Originally it was only a tiny hamlet from Saxon times
Anyone wanting to find out more about the history of Worthing can click here.

We had a great time. On the Friday we went shopping (mostly window shopping), where I lost my digital camera and mobile phone. Just like me I left it hanging somewhere while I was looking for pillows in a shop. You can’t get the South African size pillows in Europe and all our pillow cases are only for those pillows. We went for lunch where June discovered I did not have my camera on me. So, back to the shop but is was nicked of course.

We are not used to this any more. Most of the time if this happens to you in Europe they hand it in and you get it back. Not in England though. No Siree!!

That Saturday it was Peter’s sister’s birthday party and we took them down there to a little town called Tonbridge. While Peter and Carol were at the party June and I walked around in the village. How lovely that was. A typical English country village with a little stream and, of course, the mandatory castle. Tonbridge Castle

It was in Tonbridge that we discovered that an excellent English breakfast can be enjoyed at many places in villages like this. And at a reasonable price too!

On the Sunday we went for a drive to Stonehenge, just outside Salisbury on the Salisbury plains. On the right you can see some pictures of that. (Taken with Carol’s digital camera of course!)

Stonehenge, which was constructed about 5000 years ago, is surely Britain’s greatest national icon, symbolizing mystery, power and endurance.

Its original purpose is unclear, but speculation has it that it was a temple made for the worship of ancient earth deities.

It has also been called an astronomical observatory for marking significant events on the prehistoric calendar. Others claim that it was a sacred site for the burial of high-ranking citizens from the societies of long ago.

Stonehenge

While no-one can say with any degree of certainty what it was for, we can say that it wasn’t constructed for any casual purpose. Only something very important to the ancients would have been worth the effort and investment that it took to construct Stonehenge.
If you want to find out more about Stonehenge just click here

 

A couple of miles before getting there we noticed that the sides of the road were blocked of with traffic cones. At Stonehenge itself there was a big police presence as if they were expecting a lot of people.

Of course, we thought, today is the 20th of June and tomorrow is the summer solstice!

June in the pouring rain at Stonehenge

It was very impressive and we were glad that we went although it was raining cats and dogs when we arrived there.

After we came back to Belgium Peter called to say that there were about 21000 people there on the 21st! Probably the Druids and other people doing their thing.

Our magic braai! On the way back we stopped at a lay-by along the E36 back to Portsmouth and, with one of these little “throwaway braai things” made some boerewors rolls right there! These little braais are magic! Just take off the wrapping, put a match to it and voilá, you have a pretty good fire to cook on!
Well, we had a good time and will certainly do it again

And now it is back to the old grindstone. Tonight is the semi-final Euro 2004 game between Holland and Portugal. I am really torn between those two teams. On the one hand I would like Portugal to win because they are the hosts but then I am a Hollander so should be cheering for the Dutch team.

May the best team win and I just hope it won’t be a penalty shootout again.

That was it for this month.

Till next month

Lo

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Points to Ponder


Think about these ones!!

 

    • Who was the first person to look at a cow and say, “I think I’ll squeeze these dangly things here, and drink whatever comes out?”

 

    • Why do toasters always have a setting that burns the toast to a horrible crisp, which no decent human being would eat?

 

    • Why is there a light in the fridge but never in the freezer?

 

    • Why does your gynaecologist leave the room when you get undressed considering what happens next?

 

    • If sunflower oil is made from sunflowers, and vegetable oil is made from vegetables, then what is baby oil made from?

 

    • Why do the Alphabet song and Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star have the same tune?

 

    • Do illiterate people get the full effect of Alphabet Soup?

 

    • Did you ever notice that when you blow in a dog’s face, he gets mad at you, but when you take him on a car ride, he sticks his head out the window?

 

    • Does pushing the elevator button more than once make it arrive faster?

 

  • Why do they call it an asteroid when it’s outside the hemisphere, but call it a hemorrhoid when it’s in your ***?

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What’s in a name?


Worchestershire sauce

Most of us use it or have used it at one stage or the other; but what then is this complex mixture we all know as Worchestershire sauce?

Tamarind
What is now called “Worcestershire Sauce” owes its origin to British imperialism and its colonization of India.
Despite its English-sounding name, Worcestershire sauce was originally an Indian recipe. It was brought back to Britain in 1835 by Lord Marcus Sandys, the ex-governor of Bengal.
The sauce has as one of its basic ingredients the Indian spice called tamarind.

Tamarind is a seed whose taste combines the sweet with the sour. Traditional Worcestershire Sauce combines tamarind and soy sauce, with a little cinnamon and cloves.

Asian markets sell tamarind paste. Home-made Worcestershire Sauce combines the tamarind paste with soy sauce, and it includes small amounts of cinnamon, cloves, allspice, lemon grass and ground cardamom.

Anchovies
The first commercial Worcestershire Sauce was produced with the anchovy as one of its primary ingredients. Anchovies are small fish, no more than 8″ long, that have been known from classical times to be uniquely susceptible to curing and preserving, with a taste unlike that of any other fish.
After the Greeks and Romans popularized the tiny fish, they were enjoyed throughout the world. Russians enjoyed them hot-smoked. Chinese ate them dried. Thais beat them into pungent fish sauce.

However, from the Elizabethans onward, the English perfected the use of the anchovy in sauces. Throughout the 18th and 19th Centuries, the anchovy fueled the English passion for bottled sauces, like Harvey’s (anchovies, pickled walnuts, soy, shallots and garlic), Pontac ketchup (anchovies, elderberry juice, shallots and spices), and Burgess’s Anchovy Essence, which dates from 1760.

The English breakfast today still includes Gentleman’s Relish, whose major ingredient is the anchovy.

But it was Worcestershire Sauce, which was first mixed in 1838, which remains the most popular sauce worldwide today. One of its major ingredient is the anchovy.

The history of Worcestershire Sauce
Worcestershire sauce itself is of cross-cultural origins.
In 1835, Lord Marcus Sandys, an ex-governor of Bengal, approached chemists John Lea and William Perrins, whose prospering business in Broad Street, Worcester, handled pharmaceutical’s and toiletries as well as groceries.

He asked them to make up a sauce from a recipe which he brought back from India. While his lordship was apparently satisfied with the results, Messrs Lea and Perrins considered it to be an “unpalatable, red-hot fire-water” and consigned the quantity they had made for themselves to the cellars.

During the stocktaking/spring clean the following year, they came across the barrel and decided to taste it before discarding it. To their amazement, the mixture had mellowed into an aromatic, piquant and appetizing liquid like a fine wine – exhibiting a savory aromatic scent and a wonderfully unique taste. Lea & Perrins Original Worcestershire Sauce was born.

They hastily purchased the recipe from Lord Sandys and, in 1838, the Anglo-Indian Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce was launched commercially.

One of the myriad 19th-century pungent English sauces based on oriental ingredients, it had many imitators sporting pretentious names such as “British Lion” and “Empress of India”. Its exact recipe remains a secret. All that is known is that it includes vinegar, sugar, soy sauce, molasses, tamarind, shallots, anchovies, ginger, chili, cloves, nutmeg and cardamom.

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Our Home Biltong Makers


Rockey’s New Age Home Biltong maker is going from strength to strength. This is mainly due to the it’s convenient size and of course the low price one pays for it.

Most people comment on the fact that the machine pays for itself with two batches of biltong made.

The Traditional Home Biltong Maker is still very popular as well and we now have a waiting list of about one month for this old stalwart of Home Biltong makers. So, all those people ordering this machine be forewarned; there is a waiting period.

Details of the Traditional 2kg Biltong Maker can be found here.
Details on the RNA-5kg machine can be found by clicking on this link.

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This month’s special offers !


All good things must come to an end!

It has been two months now since we introduced our special pricing to celebrate our birthday in May.

By popular request we continued the “specials” throughout June although we only planned on just two weeks! Now we get innundated with requests to keep the prices as they are?

We thought about it for a while and decided that some of the special pricing has to go. However, we will keep the price of our two Home Biltong Makers the same for a while.

So, this is what you can still get at a discounted price.

 


 

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Tip of the month


Another tip to keep your Potjie rust free!

This one from Renier Joubert from Johannesburg.

Instead of using oil to prevent rust, use newspapers. Bundle them up and fill Potjie.
Just pack it tight and you will get no rust.

(What about the outside of the Potjie Renier? -Ed)

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Frequently asked questions


Every month we receive many questions from people all over the world. These questions may be about making Biltong, Boerewors or Potjiekos but can also be totally unrelated to these subjects.

 


 

The following question comes in on an almost daily basis. We have answered it before but, since it seems important to a lot of people, here it is again.

QUESTION

My Biltong making is doing great and now I want to start making my own Boerewors as well and am looking for a Boerewors maker.
I would need a mincer and something to fill the sausage.

Can you help?

ANSWER

It all depends on how much Boerewors you want to make. When I started out making Boerewors I used our Kenwood Chef and bought the mincer attachment for it.
This attachment has a sausage filling attachment included.

All this worked fine as long as I was making about 20-30 kg at a time. Once it got too much (like 100kg at a time) I spoke to my butcher and now go there to do it (at a small fee of course).

He has all the right machinery such as the mincer and the bin filler etc.

Apart from being able to do 100kg in about two hours it also has the advantage that it is done legally (at a butcher) and you will not have any trouble selling it.

 



QUESTION

My name is Rhonda, Im living in New Zealand and for some sad reason this country doesn’t have viennas!

Could you please tell me how to make them?

Thank you

Rhonda

ANSWER

Dear Rhonda,

We don’t have a recipe for viennas but perhaps there is someone out there who could tell you where to buy viennas in New Zealand?

Anyone who can help Rhonda please mail her at tandredwards@xtra.co.nz

 



QUESTION

I have two Potjie Pots both are slightly rusted inside i.e. rust spots, but after cleaning they seem to come back.
The outside is more so, especially on the lid.

Is there a cure?

ANSWER

Here, in Belgium, I have found an excellent rust remover. However, they have very good rust removers in South Africa as well. (I used to get mine from Rivonia Hardware, a Mica Shop). Just go to any hardware store and ask them.

First remove the loose rust with a normal steel brush or one attached to a drill or a small angle grinder. Then apply the rust remover. Leave it for a while and then wash the pot very well with warm water and soap.

After it is dry check for left-over rust. Brush that away also and re-apply the rust remover.
When the whole pot is clean, washed again and dried, apply a little cooking oil with a cloth.
Not too much though. Just enough to give the whole pot a slight coating.

I just received my no: 25 Potjie back after a cooking last year. It was still caked with food and totally rusted. I went through the exercise as mentioned above and my pot is now like new and does not rust at all!

 



QUESTION

I’ve been fascinated with your website for a couple of months (since last April) and seriously want to know how to make biltong from home.

I’m homesick about my favorite biltong when I used to live in SA for 17 years.

My anxiety concerns is this as you have made no mention of which is the best place to put a biltong machine ? You know what England is like in the winter times !

It is because my Mother complains that I can’t put your biltong maker in the kitchen and or at the back of the garage – for the fear of smells might affect her washing clothes and the same with clothes drying up on washing line in the garage. WHAT SHOULD I DO ? WHAT ARE THE BEST ALTERNATIVES ?

Could you tell me does the biltong maker use electricity ? If so, does it use a lot and or a little when I prefer my biltong to be medium wet ?

Does it emit a lot of smells around the room ??

My favorite is garlic biltong.
I would dearly love to make them on my own. But how do I make it and or marinate it into garlic ? What are the ingredients to produce garlic and how to dip the beef into the garlic ? What are the methods and or the exact receipes for doing this ?

ANSWER

We have left the above “cry for help” more or less the way we received it.

And for a reason!

There are lots of people out there who are simply too scared making their own biltong. They think it is too difficult and don’t want to spend money on something they believe is bound to fail.

To all those people we can only say this; making your own Biltong is as easy as 1-2-3! And we mean it when we say that. Every day we receive many mails from people across the world exclaiming how easy it really is.

Sure enough the making of Biltong has a little bit of a smell to it but then so does cooking!

What’s nicer than to walk into a kitchen when a good meal is being prepared? The same goes for Biltong. While it dries you get this incredible smell of coriander, pepper and all the other spices just begging you to open the lid and start eating it right away!

So, to all those people who think it is difficult; it is not!

Just try it. You’ll be surprised at what you can do!

 



Just read what Charmaine Basson from Cape Town has to say. Perhaps mail her and ask her yourself how easy it really is!
(We hope you don’t mind Charmaine? -Ed)

I am proud to say that making biltong seemed a daunting task – but after purchasing the 2kg biltong maker, it’s a breeze!

Charmaine Basson
Milnerton
Cape Town
(May 6, 2004)
bassonc@aforbes.co.za

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Recipe corner


This month we have no less that two recipes from Lorraine Austin in Melbourne, Australia.



Beer bread

Ingredients

 

  • 4 cups self-raising flour
  • 1 x 340ml can beer
  • 3ml salt

Method

 

  • Mix together all the ingredients and spoon the dough into a greased tart pan
  • Cover with another tart pan, fasten with wet clothes pegs and braai on the grid over hot coals for about 1 hour turning all the time
  • Otherwise bake in a greased loaf pan at 180 C for 1 hour, or microwave in a ring mould at 70% power for 10 minutes


Variation

Cheese bread

Omit the beer and add 500ml (2 cups) of buttermilk, 150g of grated cheddar cheese and 1 crushed garlic glove.

 



Van Der Hum Pancakes
(For that special winter evening)

Ingredients

 

  • 1 cup cake flour.
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 2ml salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 200mls milk
  • 200mls water
  • 5mls brandy or lemon juice
  • 125ml cooking oil
  • lemon slices to garnish

Method

 

  • Sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt
  • Bear together the eggs and milk and stir into the flour mixture
  • Add the water and beat the mixture until it has the consistency of thin cream
  • Pour in the brandy and cooking oil, and stir really well
  • Cook the pancakes in a greased, heavy based frying pan over hot coals


Now the sauce!!

 

  • 60ml Van Der Hum liqueur
  • 120g butter
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 3ml ground cinnamon
  • 3ml grated lemon rind
  • 4 bananas- halved lengthwise

Method

 

  • Heat the Van Der Hum, the butter, brown sugar, cinnamon and lemon rind
  • Stir until the butter has melted and the sugar has dissolved
  • Add the bananas and simmer for a few minutes
  • Pace a banana half on each pancake and roll up
  • Place in a serving dish and pour the remaining sauce over it
  • Serve each pancake with a slice of lemon


Makes 12 to 15 pancakes

Enjoy it!!

Lorraine

(Thank you very much for yet another great contribution Lorrainne -Ed)

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Around the World


From here, there and everywhere

This one from Annette in New Zealand

Hi Lo,

Just wanted to say a BIG THANK YOU!!!!

I am a lover of biltong and have spent an enormous amount on Biltong since living in New Zealand.

That is when I came across your site and had to buy one.

My biggest problem is that I can never make enough!!!

I bought the machine for a continuous supply for myself as it is something I used to buy weekly back home.
Now there are so many people that want biltong and I don’t mind making it to sell, but I never seem to be able to make enough.
Strangely, even the Kiwi’s are getting into.
The sad part is that they are so willing to pay unlike the South Africans…. everybody wants a freebie!!!

Could you please give me an idea on how to price the biltong for sale purposes…. at least to make a little profit so that I can buy another machine later this year. There are a few places in Auckland that you can buy biltong but it is quite pricy. The steak is generally about NZ$16.00 and they sell for around NZ$35 – NZ$45 a kg.

I have made a few batches where it is a bit too salty, how can I prevent this or is there a way to rectify it. I must say that the spice that came with the machine is divine and I have tried almost all the recipes on your web site but I have been making it with just black pepper, coriander and rock salt…. still, it seems like there is something missing though, is there another ingredient in your spice that I am missing???

My kitchen is quite compact and since it is now winter, with leaving the window open it actually makes the whole house cold.

I have a single garage with the same size window (as kitchen), would it be okay to put the machine it there?

The only thing I am worried about is that the garage is a bit colder than the house. Sorry for all the questions, how will a clothes dryer affect the biltong? Can I cover it with a cloth, when the dryer is in use (about 2hrs once a week)?

I generally have both garage doors open when the dryer is being used. I could always change to dry washing on a day that it is being marinated. because of time, I normally marinate overnight… is this what causes it to be saltier?

Will chat more next time as soon it is time to get to work and I have not been to bed yet.

Cheers

Annette
BILTONG LOVER
New Zealand
heslops@slingshot.co.nz

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Smile a While


South Africa is a great country because . . . . . . . . . . .

 

 

 

  • You can eat half dried meat and not be considered disgusting.
  • Nothing is your fault, you can blame it all on apartheid.
  • You get to buy a new car every 3 months and the insurance Company even pays for it!
  • You can experience k-k service in eleven official languages.
  • Where else can you get oranges with 45% alcohol content at Rugby matches?
  • It’s the only country in the world where striking workers show how angry they are by dancing.
  • You’re considered clumsy if you cannot: use a cell phone (Without car kit), change CDs, drink a beer, put on make-up, read the newspaper and smoke, all at the same time while driving a car at 160 kph in a 60-kph zone.
  • Great accent. (!!!)
  • If you live in Johannesburg, you get to brag about living in the most dangerous city in the world.
  • Burglar bars become a feature, and a great selling point for your house.
  • You can decorate your garden walls with barbed wire.
  • The police are the first on the scene for most major crimes, without being called.
  • Votes have to be recounted until the right party wins.
  • Illegal immigrants leave the country because the crime rate is too high.
  • The police ask you if they must follow up on the burglary you’ve just reported.
  • When a murderer gets a 6-month sentence and a pirate TV viewer 2 years.
  • The prisoners strike and get to vote in elections!
  • The police stations have panic buttons to call armed response when they are burglared.
  • Police cars are fitted with immobilizes and gear locks!
  • Prisoners get released out of prison to make room for new criminals

Ja nee!! Dis baie lekker hier!!

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SportTalk


Football – Euro 2004
Here in Europe we have been following the EURO 2004 European Football Championships with much enthusiasm.

I have never been an avid football fan. Not because I don’t like the game but simply because I grew up with Rugby and Cricket. Soccer was just not part of the sporting activities we followed in South Africa.

But now……

It has been incredible to watch the participating teams battling it out on the soccer fields of Portugal.

When I was in England two weekends ago I was amazed at how much everybody is involved in the Championships. Most houses are adorned with flags (the St George’s flag) and virtually all cars have one or two flags stuck to their side windows.

Driving through Holland a couple of days ago I saw the same, only the flags on the cars were missing. But, almost every house has banners with orange flags all over the place and radio and television are talking about it constantly.

Now that all the “big name” countries are out of the competition with only Holland left, we are waiting with abated breath what the game between Holland and Portugal will bring.
Holland has not been playing particularly well but, as a Hollander myself, I really hope they will pull it off.

Below is a little article I read about the Manager of the Dutch team. He certainly has not had a good press the past couple of weeks.

Dick to quit after finals?
Tuesday, June 29, 2004

Dick Advocaat has indicated he may quit as Holland coach after Euro 2004 following stinging personal criticism from Dutch fans and media during the tournament.
After stumbling through the group stages, Holland now face hosts Portugal in a mouth-watering semi-final clash tomorrow.

But after the 3-2 Group D loss to the Czech Republic on June 19, which jeopardised Holland’s chances of progressing, Advocaat’s tactics drew widespread condemnation from Dutch fans and the press.

The former Rangers boss replaced star winger Arjen Robben with Paul Bosvelt when his side were 2-1 up, but the substitution proved flawed as the Czechs hit back to win 3-2.

Advocaat, loyal and conservative by nature, has been clearly hurt by the criticism and hit back in an emotional outburst.

He said: ‘Things have happened that should not have happened. Borders have been crossed. I am disappointed, not in the players, as they grow to each other more and more and form a very tight team.

‘I am also very proud that this team, that was written off two years ago, has got through to the semi-finals after all. France, Germany, Italy and Spain cannot say the same.

‘But I am disappointed anyway. Things have happened that have taken away my joy in the job.’

The 56-year-old is in his second spell in charge and has had his contract extended to World Cup 2006.

However, in that contract is a clause which allows both the coach and the KNVB to part company after Euro 2004 and it now seems likely that Advocaat will exercise that clause, regardless of how far his side progress in the tournament.

Dick Advocaat is hoping history repeats itself when his team meet Portugal in Lisbon tomorrow.

‘In the last tournaments that has been the pattern,’ said Advocaat. ‘This can be a disadvantage for Portugal.’

England, Sweden and Germany were all knocked out in the semi-final stages when they hosted the tournament while co-hosts Holland themselves lost to Italy in the last four at Euro 2000.

‘I have the same concerns as the Portugal coach,’ admitted Advocaat. ‘Both teams are desperate to progress to the final and it’s a great moment to show to the world how well we can play.

‘I have nothing to prove,’ Advocaat added. ‘This is not my first tournament, I have been in a World Cup and we still try to do the same that we did then, we want to win.

‘It’s the whole team who have been working hard for the past two years and I am just a part of it.

‘It’s important for a small country like Holland to reach the final. Everyone talks about the big teams that have been eliminated but we have shown that despite being small we have enough quality.’

Advocaat is optimistic his players will not be hindered by the pressure of playing against the green and red in Portugal’s backyard.

‘I don’t think this is a real problem,’ said Advocaat. ‘We have talent and an experienced side. After all, red (Portugal) and orange (Holland) are similar colours.’

 


 

Don’t forget the TriNations will be happening shortly. If you don’t know where or how to watch the games just click on the link below.

Click here to find out where in most countries!

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The Competition


The winner of the June Competition

The winner of the June competition is Liezl Minnaar from Wiesbaden in Germany.
That’s the second winner from Germany since we started with our monthly competition.

Well done and congratulations Liezl, your brandnew “in-the-box” OmpaGrill is on its way to you. All you have to do when it arrives is to assemble it. You might need a screwdriver or two and someone to give you hand.

Please let us know how it works and perhaps send us a picture or two?

Remember the following:

 

  • The monthly draw or competition is totally free to everyone.
  • You can enter as many times as you like.
  • You can only enter via the Competition link on our home page or by clicking here
  • All prizes are sent to the winners free of charge.

 

The prize for the July Competition

The winner for the competition for July 2004 will receive one of the ever so handy Braai utensil sets complete in a smart looking metal carry case.

Click here to see a picture of the Braai Utensil Kit.

To enter the competition all you have to do is to visit our home page at www.biltongmakers.com and click on one of the two competition links.

The winners of all competitions are notified by email.

Some of the other prizes for the year

 

  • Biltongmakers
  • Biltong spices
  • Boerewors spices
  • Braai tool sets
  • Potjie Pots
  • Barbecues
  • Cadac Skottel Braais and………. much, much more!!!

 

So, don’t wait!

You can enter right now by clicking on the competition link on our home page.

 

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A free Biltong Maker!


It’s easy to earn a free Biltong Maker!

As a South African orientated web site we are constantly looking to contact more and more South Africans across the world.
Not only to tell them about how they can make their own Biltong but also to give them a chance to share their stories with other South Africans the world over.

So, here is your chance to help us.

If you know about a South African family or friend living near you or perhaps somewhere far away, why not tell them about us and then us about them.
Perhaps you can send us their email address so that we can mail them a copy of this newsletter.
If they like it they can stay on the mailing list, if not they can just let us know and we will remove them.

If the response we receive is large enough and directly due to your efforts you could be rewarded by receiving one of our products totally free of charge.

What an easy way to perhaps get your own Home Biltong Maker without having to pay a cent for it!

You can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com

During June many people went to the trouble once again of submitting their friend’s and family’s names and we would like to thank all!

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Let’s hear from you!


Help us to make it even better!

Many people are subscribing to this newsletter every day. Mostly they do so because they enjoy reading it and like to hear from people all over the world.

If you are one of our subscribers why don’t you write something yourself?

Just like you enjoy reading about what other people are up to, they might enjoy reading about you and your family.
Why not put pen to paper and tell us about anything interesting. About life in your part of the world, what you do and how you live. Perhaps something that happened to you.
You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask.

Perhaps you have some advice to give?
You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Of course it does not have to be about Biltong or food. Anything that is of interest is welcome!
Share it with other people around the world!

It would be so nice to hear from you!

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Boerewors in the Benelux


Boeries galore!!

As always during the summer months we have ample stock.
Click to me me bigger
The price is € 7.50 per kilogram for the smaller quantities under 50kg. Over 50kg it is € 6.50 when you come and fetch in Keerbergen and € 7.50 if we deliver to you. (Benelux only)

Please keep in mind that we also do Boerewors rolls and Potjiekos for up to 100 people as well as “Lamb-on-the-Spit” for functions. So if you are planning anything please let us know?

Interested parties can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com for details or phone us at +32 (16) 53.96.25.

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Potjie Pots in the Benelux

Click to me me bigger

We have just received a new batch of size 3 and size 4 Potjie Pots.

For those who are interested please call us at +32 (16) 53.96.25

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Previous issues of this Newsletter

 

You can click on the links below to view some of the previous issues of our newsletter.

June 2003
July 2003
August 2003
September 2003
October 2003
November 2003
December 2003
Jan/Feb 2004
March 2004
April 2004
May 2004
June 2004


Subscribing and unsubscribing
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Perhaps you would like to subscribe to this newsletter or tell a friend about Biltongmakers.Com! and the incredible Biltong Makers!!
You can be included in this newsletter by clicking on the following link.
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If you prefer not to receive email from us, you can unsubscribe from Biltongmakers.Com! by clicking on this link.
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June 2004

The Newsletter
June 2004

You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
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In this Newsletter

Just click on any of the subjects to jump straight to it

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From the editor

Keerbergen
Belgium
June 1, 2004

Looking at the thermometer reading on our web site I saw that at 9am this morning it was 4C in Johannesburg and a lovely 11C here in Keerbergen.

Although the summer isn’t quite here yet we have had some lovely days with loads of sun!

It’s June and we are already almost halfway through the year.

How time flies!

May has been an incredible month in many respects. The first thing we must do is to thank all those people who sent us their best wishes. It was really very much appreciated and so nice to hear from so many!

Some of our suppliers even gave us a discount as a birthday present!!

 



A couple of weeks ago June and I went down to Dunkirk.

At home we first watched a two hour documentary on what happened there in 1940 when all those armies were cornered by the Germans and how so many boats, from fishing boat, to army vessels to pleasure craft went across the channel to take them of the beaches. it was fascinating to see where it all took place.
I love history so here is a little something I put together to refresh our memories of that incredible happening.

 



In the closing days of May 1940, just months into World War II, Britain teetered on the edge of military disaster. The German army had advanced across Europe and penned the British forces into a tiny area around the French port of Dunkirk. Hitler’s tanks were just 10 miles away and the capture or death of the 400,000 troops seemed imminent. Yet by 4 June, over 338,000 men had been evacuated to England in one of the greatest rescues of all time.

They were rescued from the harbour and beaches near to Dunkirk by a curious assembly of many different types of craft.

Many of the little ships, such as motor yachts, fishing boats and all manner of other such craft, were privately owned.

Hundreds of civilian ships helped the soldiers to escape Although a large number of these ships were taken across the channel by navy personnel – many were also taken over by their owners and other civilians, all eager to help in what had become a catastrophe.

The British, French and Belgium governments had seriously underestimated the strength of the German forces in their equipment, transport and fire power – which was far superior to much of our outdated armoury.
Consequently the British Expeditionary Force, as well as the French and Belgian forces, found themselves defending positions against overwhelming odds.

Before long, with the Germans effectively cutting off nearly all of the escape routes to the channel, the BEF found itself desperately retreating to the harbour and beaches of Dunkirk.

A desperate retreat to the harbour and beaches of Dunkirk Vice Admiral Ramsay – who was in charge of Operation Dynamo – had sent destroyers and transport ships to evacuate the troops, but they only expected to have time to lift off about 30,000 troops.

However, before long, the harbour became partially blocked by ships sunk in consistent attacks from enemy aircraft. It became necessary to take the troops off the nearby beaches as well – something that was thought to be an almost impossible task because of shallow water.
This is when the little ships came to play their part. A variety of motor boats, fishing smacks, trawlers, lifeboats, paddle steamers and many other types of craft came over the channel to assist in the escape.
They mainly ferried the troops from the beaches to the destroyers laying offshore – but thousands of troops came all the way back to England in some of these boats.

The escape captured the minds and hearts of the British people at a time when it looked probable that they too would soon be invaded. It seemed like a victory in just getting the troops back – over a third of a million of them – to fight another day.

 



Apart from going to Dunkirk we stayed home most of the time tending to the garden and getting the outside shipshape for the summer.
It’s nice to feel some sun on our bodies again although it must not get too warm!

Somehow Paris did not happen this month but we are sure to do it again soon, although not in June. This month we are going to the UK to see a play at the Westend. That should be quite an experience as well because we will be taking the Eurotrain.

This will mean a trip down to Calais where they put your car on the train. Thirty minutes later you are through the channel tunnel and in England!

We’ll tell you all about that trip the next time.

That was it again.

I hope you will all have a very good month of June so…….

Till next month

Lo

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Points to Ponder


Stress management

A professor was giving a lecture to his students on stress management.

He raised a glass of water and asked the audience, “How heavy do you think this glass of water is?”

The students’ answers ranged from 20mg to 500mg.

The professor said “It does not matter on the absolute weight. It depends on how long you hold it.
If I hold it for a minute, it is OK.
If I hold it for an hour, I will have an ache in my right arm.
If I hold it for a day, you will have to call an ambulance.
It is the exact same weight, but the longer I hold it, the heavier it becomes.”

“If we carry our burdens all the time, sooner or later, we will not be able to carry on, the burden becoming increasingly heavier.”

“What you have to do is to put the glass down and rest for a while before holding it up again.”

We have to put down the burden periodically so that we can be refreshed and are able to carry on.

So, before you return home from work tonight, put the burden of work down. Don’t carry it back home. You can pick it up tomorrow.

Whatever burdens you have on your shoulders, let it down for a moment if you can.

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They got it wrong!


Pirate ships hoisted the Jolly Roger

“There was the Jolly Roger – the black flag of piracy – flying from her peak”

The ship is the Hispaniola and it has just been seized by John Silver. The book is that classic saga of piracy, Treasure Island, by Robert Louis Stevenson.

But would Long John have run the Jolly Roger up the mast? Was there ever such a flag? Strangely enough, the answer is almost certainly no.

The black flag with the white skull and crossed bones appears to be mythical.

Pirates might possibly have used a plain black flag to strike terror into merchantmen. Or, more probably, the idea of the Jolly Roger may stem from the old Imperial Austrian flag which features a black double-headed eagle on a yellow background.

From a distance, it may have resembled a skull and crossbones.

In the eighteenth century a great many privateers sailed under the Austrian letters of marque which were more easily obtained than these of other nations.

These privateers were considered little better than pirates.

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Our Home Biltong Makers


Rockey’s New Age Home Biltong maker has really proved to be a winner with a lot of people making their own Biltong.

It is not only suitable for use at home but also for those people who are making Biltong as a small Home Industry.

The machine dries the meat quick, under very hygienic conditions and in sufficient quantities to allow a regular small resale stock.

The Traditional 2kg Home Biltong maker remains a steady stallward for those people who like a piece of Billies while watching a rugby match or some cricket.

After a small but shortlived stock hiccup during May (because of all the “specials” orders being placed) the factories are again up-to-date. There is ample stock and orders are now once again going out as they come in.

Details of the Traditional 2kg Biltong Maker can be found here.
Details on the RNA-5kg machine can be found by clicking on this link.

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This month’s special offers !


Let’s do it some more!!

As a “THANK YOU!” for the tremendous response and support we had, as well as all the good wishes we received during our birthday month in May we have decided to carry on a little while longer with some of the same special offers!!

So……………….

For a limited period during the month of June this is what you can still get on “special”

 

Special discounts for Special customers!!


Free with all Biltong Maker orders placed

  • 20 special Biltong storage bags
  • A packet of our famous “Bobotie” Nice ‘n Spicy spices complete with recipe.

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Tip of the month


All about Potjiekos

This one from the all-time Master of Potjiekos – Kel Malherbe.

Some lucky folk living on Planet North are currently basking in summer sunshine whereas those of us here on Planet South are chattering away in our winter woollies! We are forced indoors when practicing our culinary arts while northern SAers and other outdoor lovers are free to enjoy the griddles, grates, sizzles and aromas which come with outdoor feasting around the open fire.

And speaking about Potjiekos, what a great opportunity for you northern SAers and Potjiekos fanatics to haul out that three legged Pot Bellied marvel for an outdoor summer occasion with friends.

Just brush up on the fundamentals:

– The whole foundation of Potjiekos preparation rests on long cooking times and this strikes at the heart of present day living where meals must often be prepared as quickly as possible. If your desire is for quality and flavour, go for Potjiekos; if in a hurry, leave the Potjie in storage until a relaxing weekend comes up.

Potjiekos is creation, not cremation.

– Although the heat must be strong initially, once the pot itself (and the lid!) has been well warmed up, the bulk of the cooking time should be done on the lowest possible heat. Gas is ideal at the level of the smallest blue flame. Some scattered embers of an open fire should do the trick, but do not allow the coals to die out!

– The secret of Potjiekos is to firstly sauté the onions in the heated pot and remove. Then brown the meat and add back the onions. Add liquid as per recipe, replace the lid and let this gently simmer for a few hours. Do not open the lid or stir until the meat is nearly done! You can now remove the lid, layer the veggies, the slower cooking ones first, and add the herbs and seasoning. Replace the lid and be ready to serve after the pot has bubbled for another 30 minutes or so.

– If possible, never add water on its own to any Potjie. Use a good stock, beer, fresh fruit juice or wine. Remember, wine is the heart of any Potjie!

– Herbs and spices are also a must, especially garlic. A Potjie is just not a Potjie without garlic!

Although many Potjie recipes are available always remember that the end result of each Potjiekos is as individual as its creator and, that with time, each Potjie seems to develop its own character devoted to the whims of its master!

(We have some very nice Potjiekos Recipes on our web site -Ed)

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Frequently asked questions


Every month we receive many questions from people all over the world. These questions may be about making Biltong, Boerewors or Potjiekos but can also be totally unrelated to these subjects.

 



QUESTION

How well will the biltong maker work in a cool well ventilated room? There is air conditioning and the room is sub 15 deg, always. Would that be too cool to allow the lightbulb to dry the meat?

ANSWER

A Sub Zero temperature is too cold to effectively dry the meat. The dampness in such surroundings would also work against the drying process.

The best place to keep a Biltong maker is in a well ventilated room at a normal temperature. Preferably a room where no air conditioning is used.

 



QUESTION

I live in NZ and want to purchase a biltong making machine.

Yours looks great, but I’m concerned about meat juices etc dripping down onto the bottom of the unit from the hanging meat and into the element, making it difficult to clean and possibly a hygiene issue further down the track.

Could you comment on this, please?

Also, your machine doesn’t appear to have a fan option, only heat … does it rely solely on natural convection for air circulation?

ANSWER

All biltong meat is dried to a more or lesser extent, even at the butchers!
What a mess it would make if you did not dry the meat before hanging it. And we are not even talking about the flies and other insects it would attract.

Once the meat is patted dry very little drippings will fall on the bottom plate of the machine. To clean the plate you simply remove it and wash it under the tap with some nice warm soapy water.

The answer to the second question is easy; our machines use simple convection to dry the meat. The machines are too small to make use of a fan. It would cool the meat too much. We have tried fans in our Home Dryers and it just does not work.

Our large industrial dryers make use of fans but then you dry up to 120kg of wet meat at a time!

 



QUESTION

I have just bought a biltong box from a friend and so far have done two batches.

The first (his) was very salty, and the second (mine) was very nicely flavoured. The problem is that the outside of the strips are very hard to chew whilst the inside is still relatively wet.

The box is basically an Addis dirt bin with several holes drilled in the lower side bottoms with an extractor fan. This operation was carried out in my garage which has very little ventilation and air flow.

The temperature in Pietermaritzburg has been very hot until now.

Someone has suggested that I place a 40 watt light bulb at the base of the box as there might be to much moisture in the air resulting in the biltong being tough (the meat was in the box for 6 days)

Can you assist??

ANSWER

We don’t know what your “Addis” box does apart from blowing air into it. A Meat Dryer needs a certain amount of warmth at the bottom to dry the meat. Also, you have holes in the bottom of the machine. Hot air rises and needs to escape somewhere so the holes should be on top! It looks like you have just a bin with a fan blowing air into it. This air (without heat) will only dry the outside of the meat.

We have taken a long time to come up with the right temperature to dry the meat.

The solution to your problem could be to fit a 40 watt globe at the bottom of the bin so that the rising warm air can dry the meat.

Alternatively a foolproof way is to get yourself a Home Biltong Maker from Biltongmakers.Com!

That is sure to work!

 



QUESTION

I have recently started using a Weber and I am most impressed by the smoky flavour the meat has once cooked in there.

I’ve done a few whole spiced chickens and the meat just falls off the bone and is very moist. I’m not normally a great fan of chicken breast because of the drynes of the meat but done in the Weber it remains moist even when well cooked.

What I am searching for is preparation/operating instructions and any cooking tips. i.e. How to prepare and place the fire in the Weber; when to put meat in – with flames or once fire has died down a bit; which vents to open/close etc.

I would appreciate any suggestions or web links you might have regarding the Weber.

ANSWER

There are many Weber manuals on the market.

The one we use is called “Barbecuing the WEBER© covered way. The book is published by R Arthur Barrett and published for Weber-Stephen products company by TRP (Tested Recipes Publishers, Inc, Chicago.

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Recipe corner


Bushveld venison roast

The hunting season is around the corner in South Africa and venison aplenty is available in food stores and butchers across the country.

Personally, as a conservationist, I am no hunter and have never pointed a gun at man nor beast. Fortunately, I have several friends who are hunter freaks partaking in culling as often as the opportunity presents itself and I often get to be invited along as a “gun bearer”!

I jump at it every time as I am addicted to the great outdoors of this country, where game abounds, be it on the plateaus of the Eastern Cape, the endless savannas of the far North Western Cape or, my favourite, the Transvaal bushveld.

Nothing can beat being up and about with a steaming cup of coffee before sunrise, standing next to the fire discussing the route of the day ahead while listening to the cries of the wild as they rise from their slumbers.

For me, a wonderful day of stealth and stalking always lies ahead, drinking in the smell of the bush and listening to the screech of the sun-beatles – and then the weight of that bloody gun!

I always thought that a rifle has a constant weight factor. Not so, I am living proof when I say there is a dramatic increase in weight as morning gives way to afternoon.

But all is well around the huge redwood campfire in the evening with meat sizzling on the coals, the pot of pap steaming away and brown liquid sustenance flowing by the gallon!

So, here we go with a venison dish as the recipe this month.

Venison is readily available in most countries and if you manage to stumble across a 2.5kg leg of Springbok you’re in big business!
Otherwise 2.5kg of any other leg of venison will do or a 1.5 to 1.75kg deboned venison roast (use two small roasts to make up the weight if required) is also excellent.

It is imperative to use a heavy duty cast iron pot (or any other heavy based one) which can fit the meat as we are looking at a long cooking time and must avoid base burn.
An elongated or oval pot is ideal for a “bone-in” roast, or you can ask your butcher to cut through the bone in a couple of places so that you can “roll” the roast into a round pot.

You will also need a suitable size plastic marinating container with a tightly fitting lid.

Ingredients

 

  • 2.5kg Venison
  • 350gr spek (pork fat)
  • 750 ml bottle red wine
  • 3ml white pepper
  • 4ml ground ginger
  • 8 plump cloves fresh garlic (thickly sliced)
  • 3 large onions (sliced)
  • 6 whole cloves
  • 25ml salt
  • 25ml sugar
  • 25ml flour
  • 50ml smooth apricot jam
  • Half a cup of sweet wine
  • Corn flour to thicken gravy
  • Small glass of port for gravy
  • 125ml sour cream for gravy
  • Heaped tblsp of any fruit jelly powder for gravy.

Method

Preparing/Marinating the meat

 

  • Cut the spek (pork fat) into pencil sized pieces and sprinkle with some salt and sugar.
  • Make deep holes in the meat with a sharp knife, insert a piece or two of sliced garlic and then the spek, forced down the hole by finger.
  • Place the meat in a container, add the wine and onions and marinate in fridge for 3 – 4 days turning it twice a day. Ensure that the meat is always covered on all sides by some onions.

Then, the big day!

Start early as cooking time is going to be about three hours, shorter or longer depending on the quality of the cut of meat.

  • Remove the meat from the marinade, pat it a little dry with kitchen towel and rub it all over with a mixture of the flour mixed with the salt, sugar and ginger.
  • Heat some oil in the pot and brown the meat on all sides.
  • Add the cloves and strained marinade and bring to boiling point.
  • Turn down the heat until the pot is simmering gently. It must never boil!!
  • Simmer for about three hours turning the meat regularly.
  • Add some water or extra wine if and when necessary.
  • At the end of the cooking process there should be a couple of cups of liquid at the base of the pot for making gravy.
  • Half an hour before serving, remove the meat onto a baking tray, spread it with the jam mixed with the sweet wine and place in pre-heated oven at 180 degrees and brown. Careful now because jam catches quickly. Keep a constant eye on it. Turn the oven off if necessary.

The gravy

 

  • Mix the flour with 250ml of water and add it to the juices in the pot.
  • Bring to the boil and turn down to simmer.
  • Adjust the consistency with more flour or water if required. Scrape in all bits and pieces from the sides of pot.
  • Stir the jelly, sugar, port and cream together and mix into the gravy.
  • Simmer for a minute or two before transferring to gravy boats.

Serving the dish

Present this dish to the guests with aplomb!

  • Carve the meat as thinly as possible.
  • Serve with rice (mixed with a cupful of de-pipped raisins if you wish), baked potatoes, cauliflower or broccoli with a cheesy mustard sauce, and a crunchy green salad.

Variation

 

  • Oxtail, fatty bits and all, is an excellent addition to all game dishes. It adds succulence to the dish and can be used as an add-in to bring the weight requirement of the meat in any game recipe up to spec. In this one, simply add oxtail if required and simmer together with the venison until the meat falls off the bones. Remove the bones and discard.

Cook’s tips

 

  • Trim the ends of the spek (pork fat) into sharp points and freeze them until they become like spikes. It makes threading the meat so much simpler.
  • You will know that the meat is done when small fissures (shallow cracks) begin to appear in it when you turn it around with a fork during cooking.
  • If you do not have a deepfryer in which you can do the roast potatoes separately, and the roast is going to occupy your oven at a critical time, do them before the time and keep them in the warmer uncovered.
    A lid on will make them go soggy.

Bon appetite!

Kel

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People comments


Hi there Biltong Team!

I am proud to say that making biltong seemed a daunting task – but after purchasing the 2kg biltong maker, it’s a breeze!

Charmaine Basson
Milnerton
Cape Town
(May 6, 2004)
bassonc@aforbes.co.za

 



Hi there,

Just to let you know that my 2kg biltong maker arrived 2 weeks ago.
It was a birthday present for my boyfriend who’s from Joburg and he was really made up with it. He logged on to your web site where he got the chilli recipe and went straight to work on it when he got home.

His batches don’t seem to last kissing time which says a lot. He’s even tried kangaroo meat and was really happy with it!!!!

To be honest, I don’t think he has turned the machine off yet.

Boys and their toys hey?

I’ll see him this weekend and warned him to have some ready!
I will ask him to e-mail you to let you know what he thinks of it.

Thanks a mil, it was worth the wait!

Stephanie Fahy
Ireland
(May 5, 2004)
stephanie.fahy@CorkCoCo.ie

(We are eagerly awaiting his email Stephanie-Ed)

 



Hi Biltong Team,

Last friday I finally received my very own biltong-maker, thank you very much!
I actually had the first biltong ready to eat and it is delicious.

Many greetings from Germany,

Nicole Boes-Haufe
Germany
(May 3, 2004)
nicole@haufe-space.com

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Around the World


From here, there and everywhere

Hi Lo and the Team,

I have been using the HBM for several months now and we always seem to have a batch of biltong on the go.

I have used up all the spice I originally ordered from you and tried the versatile biltong recipe. That was a disaster because I used silverside from the supermarket and the meat was cut in the wrong direction, across the muscle, not down.
I also think the type of sugar I used was wrong. It was very fine dark brown sugar and two cups seemed to be too much. It took ages to dry and tasted “not nice”. Even the dog wasn’t too keen on it and I eventually minced it up for the birds.

I then started buying the meat direct from our very helpful butcher and made the “Dark and Shiny Biltong”.

That works very well!

Also, I just make ordinary biltong with coriander, salt, pepper and vinegar and worcestershire sauce, that is very good also.

I am now considering buying another biltong maker!

Do you think that red wine vinegar would be suitable for making biltong? All we get over here is either malt vinegar or distilled white vinegar and I think it has a much sharper taste than the grape vinegar we used to get in SA.

I always remember the smell of the big barrel of vinegar my grandfather used to have in his shop when I was a child. People used to bring along their own bottles and they were filled with vinegar pumped from the barrel.

I recently had some red wine vinegar with a salad, and this seemed to smell and taste similar to old fashioned grape vinegar.

Thanks again for the HBM

Geraldine Roddis.
England
g.roddis@ntlworld.com

PS. A cheeky question: How many news letters do you send out each month? I typed “biltong maker” in the Google search engine and Biltongmakers.Com seemed to pop up from all over the world.

(We send out around 12000 newsletter every month -Ed)

 


 

Hello everybody at Biltongmakers!

People are pretty hyped up since the announcement that the Soccer World Cup 2010 will be taking place in South Africa. I can’t really relate to sports’ fans, except for F1 racing (Michael Schumacher to be precise).

Trying to describe Cape Town or the Western Cape is really a matter of “you have to see it to believe it”.
We, as Capetonians, tend to forget that we are surrounded by towns within driving distance where one can relax and enjoy a break from the city life. Judging from what I see, tourism is booming in South Africa all year round.
Just for a teaser – we have:

  • The famous wine route where you cannot help but indulge in our local cheeses and wines.
  • The seasonal whale watching in Hermanus.
  • Our coastline sports beaches with breathtaking views.
  • Some outstanding restaurants (too many to mention) that cater for all cuisine from seafood to typical South African dishes.

We really have the best of both worlds (country life and bustling city life).

I hope the visitors of Biltongmakers will get to Cape Town sometime to give their opinion of this side of the world.

For a glimpse of what we have to offer, log on to: www.cape-town.org

Charmaine Basson
Cape Town
BassonC@Aforbes.co.za

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Smile a While


Letter to a mother

A mother enters her daughter’s bedroom and sees a letter over the bed.
With the worst premonition, she reads it, with trembling hands:

Dear Mom,

It is with great regret and sorrow that I’m telling you that I eloped with my new boyfriend. I found real passion, and he is so nice, with all his piercings and tattoos and his big motorcycle.

But not only that Mom, I’m pregnant and Ahmed said that we will be very happy in his trailer in the woods. He wants to have many more children with me and that’s one of my dreams also.

I’ve learned that marijuana doesn’t hurt anyone and we’ll be growing it for ourselves and his friends, who are providing us with all the cocaine and ecstasy we may want.

In the meantime, we’ll pray for science to find the AIDS cure for Ahmed to get better – he deserves it.

Don’t worry Mom,
I’m 15 years old now and I know how to take care of myself.

Some day I’ll visit you so you can get to know your grandchildren.

Your daughter,
Judith

PS: Mom, it’s not true. I’m at the neighbour’s house. I just wanted to show you that there are worse things in life than the report card that’s in my desk drawer…I love you!

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SportTalk


Rugby

Boks in disarray ahead of Irish visit

(By Brenden Nel)

Springbok coach Jake White’s two-Test series against Ireland is in jeopardy, not only because of a reported pay strike by the Irish players, but also because of shoddy planning by the South African Rugby Football Union. And, while Sarfu have promised responsibility and a new dawn for our rugby, they have resorted to the age-old tactic of denial, sweeping problems under the carpet.

If the Irish can overcome their pay dispute and bring their troops to these shores, they will find a disorganised bunch of Springboks.

The Boks have no logistics manager – Emile Ferris resigned from this position after failing to arrive in Bloemfontein for the training camp – and no team doctor. In addition, 10 players have failed fitness tests under White’s regime.

It is a far cry from the new dawn promised by the Springbok coach. And while those within the team ranks have talked openly about the failure to get the basics right, Sarfu has denied the existence of a problem.

A lot of hard work
awaits the
Springboks before
the Irish arrive
Palty Lekalakala resigned as team doctor after failing to reach an accord with the national body. But whereas the team have suggested that work commitments lay behind the resignation, Lekalakala has slated them for failing to inform him of the Bok schedule ahead of time so that he could make himself available. The result is that, one week into the camp, Sarfu are still negotiating the services of a doctor, and two Springboks have been sent home because the official team doctor was not there when they were injured.

Ferris, whose appointment was initially questioned because he worked for Sarfu President Brian van Rooyen’s company, LABAT SA, had no experience in the position to which he was appointed. It was reported on Sunday that he had failed to send energy drinks and mineral water – to be used in the away leg of the Tri Nations later this year – to Australia and New Zealand, in compliance with the those countries’ customs regulations.

Ferris had previously been suspended by the Golden Lions for fielding over-age players in a youth tournament.

Mac Hendricks, the successful Bok logistics manager for the past four years, was fired without proper notice and told to return his Laptop and Cellphone while on tour with the Cats.

Negotiations have started to return Hendricks to the side as a consultant, but the team have announced they would share the responsibilities for the logistical arrangements.

On Sunday the team released a statement saying that allegations that Ferris had not fulfilled his tasks were “unfounded”.

“Mr Ferris was unable to continue in the position as a result of work commitments and pressures. Since his appointment earlier this year Mr Ferris had made much progress in putting in place the logistics plan for the forthcoming international season. The team’s management fully understands and respects Mr Ferris’s decision,” the statement said.

Yet Ferris is employed by Van Rooyen – surely any commitments would have been sorted out by the head of his enterprise.

As for Lekalakala, the former team doctor slammed Sarfu at the weekend for their “deplorable arrangements” – he had received his first sight of the Springbok schedule just four hours before he discovered he was due to be on a flight to Bloemfontein. After being approached by White, Lekalakala, the head of the 90-strong medical team at the Road Accident Fund, tried in vain to get a letter of appointment. He finally got an email on May 4, but still had no schedule to arrange leave with.

“The communication lines were deplorable and the letter did not make sense to me. Still, I went to my boss and he said that it was impossible and that I had two choices: I could either resign or turn down the Springboks,” he said.

As with the Ferris issue, the team has tried to distance itself from Lekalakala’s complaints.

In the same statement, it said: “Team management also wishes to confirm that Dr Palty Lekalakala has been unable to take up the post of team doctor, also due to other work commitments. Negotiations are currently under way with the Western Province Rugby Union regarding Dr Yusuf Hassan’s availability for the post. Once these negotiations have been successfully concluded, Dr Hassan will join the team in Bloemfontein. In the meantime, management wishes to thank Dr Louis Holtzhausen of Free State for assisting the team in a part-time capacity.”

With 10 Springboks not up to scratch by Bok coaching standards, a lot of hard work awaits the side before the Irish arrive for their two Tests in Bloemfontein. Unless drastic changes are made, the Irish are likely to play a team that are ripe for the picking.

(This article was originally published on page 1 of The Mercury on May 24, 2004)



-Where can you watch rugby on TV-?

Click here to find out where in most countries!

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The Competition


The winner of the May Competition

The winner of the May competition is Avril Barnard from Bethlehem in the Free State.
We’ve had a couple of winners from South Africa over the years but never one from the Free State, let alone Bethlehem!
Well done and congratulations Avril, your brandnew RNA-5kg Home Biltong maker as well as 1kg of our famous pre-mixed Biltong spice is on its way to you!

Remember the following:

 

  • The monthly draw or competition is totally free to everyone.
  • You can enter as many times as you like.
  • You can only enter via the Competition link on our home page or by clicking here
  • All prizes are sent to the winners free of charge.

 

The prize for the June Competition

The winner for the competition for June will receive one of the ever so popular OmpaGrills.

We have had the OmpaGrill as a prize on a number of occasions and it has always proved to be very popular.

Click here to see a picture of the famous OmpaGrill taken on Derek and Jeanine’s patio in Antwerp.

To enter the competition all you have to do is to visit our home page at www.biltongmakers.com and click on one of the two competition links.

The winners of all competitions are notified by email.

Some of the other prizes for the year

 

  • Biltongmakers
  • Biltong spices
  • Boerewors spices
  • Braai tool sets
  • Potjie Pots
  • Barbecues
  • Cadac Skottel Braais and………. much, much more!!!

 

So, don’t wait!

You can enter right now by clicking on the competition link on our home page.

 

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A free Biltong Maker!


It’s easy to earn a free Biltong Maker!

As a South African orientated web site we are constantly looking to contact more and more South Africans across the world.
Not only to tell them about how they can make their own Biltong but also to give them a chance to share their stories with other South Africans the world over.

So, here is your chance to help us.

If you know about a South African family or friend living near you or perhaps somewhere far away, why not tell them about us and then us about them.
Perhaps you can send us their email address so that we can mail them a copy of this newsletter.
If they like it they can stay on the mailing list, if not they can just let us know and we will remove them.

If the response we receive is large enough and directly due to your efforts you could be rewarded by receiving one of our products totally free of charge.

What an easy way to perhaps get your own Home Biltong Maker without having to pay a cent for it!

You can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com

During May many people went to the trouble once again of submitting their friend’s and family’s names and we would like to thank all!

One RNA-5kg Biltongmaker has already been given away to Mike Rogers who lives in Amsterdam!
Well done and thank you very much Mike. Three of the people who were recommended to our web site by you have placed orders of their own!

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Let’s hear from you!


Help us to make it even better!

Many people are subscribing to this newsletter every day. Mostly they do so because they enjoy reading it and like to hear from people all over the world.

If you are one of our subscribers why don’t you write something yourself?

Just like you enjoy reading about what other people are up to, they might enjoy reading about you and your family.
Why not put pen to paper and tell us about anything interesting. About life in your part of the world, what you do and how you live. Perhaps something that happened to you.
You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask.

Perhaps you have some advice to give?
You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Of course it does not have to be about Biltong or food. Anything that is of interest is welcome!
Share it with other people around the world!

It would be so nice to hear from you!

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Boerewors in the Benelux


Boeries galore!!

As always during the summer months we have ample stock.
Click to me me bigger
The price is € 7.50 per kilogram for the smaller quantities under 50kg. Over 50kg it is € 6.50 when you come and fetch in Keerbergen and € 7.50 if we deliver to you. (Benelux only)

Please keep in mind that we also do Boerewors rolls and Potjiekos for up to 100 people as well as “Lamb-on-the-Spit” for functions. So if you are planning anything please let us know?

Interested parties can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com for details or phone us at +32 (16) 53.96.25.

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Potjie Pots in the Benelux

Click to me me bigger

We have only one size 4 Potjie Pot left.

For those who are interested please call us at +32 (16) 53.96.25

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Previous issues of this Newsletter

 

You can click on the links below to view some of the previous issues of our newsletter.

September 2003
October 2003
November 2003
December 2003
Jan/Feb 2004
March 2004
April 2004
May 2004


Subscribing and unsubscribing
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Perhaps you would like to subscribe to this newsletter or tell a friend about Biltongmakers.Com! and the incredible Biltong Makers!!
You can be included in this newsletter by clicking on the following link.
Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

If you prefer not to receive email from us, you can unsubscribe from Biltongmakers.Com! by clicking on this link.
Unsubscribe me please.

May 2004

The Newsletter
May 2004

You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
If you do not wish to receive this newsletter you may unsubscribe at the bottom where you will find an automatic link. Your name will then be permanently deleted from our database.
If you, your family or your friends want to subscribe to the newsletter please click on this link. Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

In this Newsletter

Just click on any of the subjects to jump straight to it

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From the editor

Keerbergen
Belgium
May 1, 2004

It’s nice and quiet here at the moment.
The sun is shining outside and I can just hear the sound of someone mowing the lawn.

It’s the first of May and, like in most countries, a holiday in Belgium as well. A lot of people have probably driven down to coast.

How time flies! It was just the other day that we were decorating the Christmas tree!
It was also just the other day that we were wading through inches of snow to get to our front door!
And now it is well into Spring and the real Summer is just around the corner.

We have had some really nice days already. The garden has been done (twice already) and things are starting to look nice again. Everything is green and lush.
I have even had the aircon in the car switched on a couple of times the past weeks.

The other day while driving down to Luxembourg (again), I went of exit 23a and, just down the road to a beautiful little castle. In the castle they had a lovely restaurant and tea garden. We must go back there one Sunday afternoon and just sit there and relax. It is just so nice and peaceful out there.

One Friday last month June took the day off and we drove up to Holland to visit the Keukenhof (Garden Court).

The Keukenhof is near the town of Lisse and is a beautiful park laid out with all kinds of flowers in between rolling lawns and lakes. click to see me bigAs most of you will know, Holland is famous for their tulips and flowers in general. While going there we drove through huge farmers fields full of all kinds of different flowers. Just imagine a mielie or corn field and, in your mind, replace the mielies and corn with flowers. Reds and blues and yellows and pinks, to many colours to mention.

Like a mielie farmer farms with mielies, those farmers farm with flower bulbs. Ever wondered where the bulb you buy for your garden come from? Now you know. Too incredible to see!

It was a breathtaking sight.

Here are a couple of pictures of the Keukenhof. Just click on them to see them big!

On the 21st of this month we are planning to go down to Paris. I have to go there anyway so we thought of making it a long weekend.
It would be nice to stroll around there again and perhaps catch the show at the Moulin Rouge or have dinner on one of the boats on the Seine at night. We have already booked at the same little hotel we went to last year.
It was so like Paris.
None of the glitz and glamour of the big hotels, just an old little place in the heart of the town, just 5 minutes walk away from the Eifel Tower.
If we go I promise to tell you all about it in next month’s letter.

May has always been a special month. Apart from it being my birthday this month it is also the month that we started Biltongmakers.Com so many years ago.

Next year we will be 10 years old!

Since this is our birthday month we are trying to make it special for all our customers. It has been difficult for many people to get their own Biltong maker and many of the other nice goodies we have on the web site as well. This has been mainly due to the strength of the Rand. With the Rand being what it is at the moment the prices for our products in other currencies have increased.

So, with this in mind, we have made a very special plan. As you will see further on in this news letter you will be able to make use of many special prices and even some freebies as well for the whole of this month.

Make good use of it because we can not extend it beyond the end of May.

Then on to a different matter.

Every month, when putting together the newsletter we sorely miss input from you, the people who read and enjoy reading this letter. We receive so many mails and so many people subscribe every month and we just wondered ……

Just like you enjoy reading about people in other parts of the world, they too might enjoy reading about you, in your part of the world!

Please help me to make this newsletter more interactive and let’s get some contributions in the form of an editorial, a recipe, a hint or tip or whatever you think might be of interest to people just like yourself.

It would be so nice to hear a little more about what is happening to all those people from all over the world who give us such nice feedback every month.

Till next month

Lo

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Points to Ponder


Something to make you think

  • All you can do is your best. Do it and don’t worry; Let the chips fall where they may.
  • The person who knows where he or she wants to go has the best chance of getting there.
  • Never promise more that you can deliver. In the long run it will do you far more harm than good.
  • The most important time to keep your temper is when the other person doesn’t.
  • When the going gets rough, KEEP SMILING!
  • Everybody starts every day with the same amount of time.
  • A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle.
  • Change is inevitable except from a vending machine.
  • The amount of sleep required by the average person is about five minutes more.
  • As long as you’re going to think anyway – you might as well think BIG!
  • Good enough never is.

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They got it wrong!


Cleopatra’s needle belonged to Cleopatra

Cleopatra’s Needle, one of the landmarks of London, has no connection with the Egyptian queen.

She was born in 69BC, and died 39 years later. But the pilar, almost 21 meters high and weighing 180 tons, is nearly 1500 years older.

It was originally one of a pair made for the warrior pharaoh Thutmose III in about 1500BC, and it bears an inscription to him and to Ramses II (ca.1304-1237BC).
It once adorned the temple of the sun god at Heliopolis. It was given to Britain by the Egyptian government, and has stood on the Thames Embankment since 1878.

The other one of the pair was given to America and stands in Central Park, New York City.

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Our Home Biltong Makers


Thanks to an enormous effort by Trish and all who helped her at our shipping department in Johannesburg we have no more backlog of orders!

The factories are up-to-date, there is ample stock and orders are now once again going out as they come in.

May will be a fantastic month as far as the Biltong Makers (and some of our other products) are concerned.

Since it is our birthday this month we are offering all our loyal customers many specials. These will be in the form of price reductions as well as free give-aways!

Please check the section on THIS MONTH’S SPECIAL OFFERS (following right after this) for all the details!

Details of the Traditional 2kg Biltong Maker can be found here.
Details on the RNA-5kg machine can be found by clicking on this link.

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This month’s special offers !


It’s our Birthday!

This month is will be nine years ago that we made our very first Home Biltong Maker. As most of you will know by now we did not really invent the original 2kg Biltong Maker.
We had an old Cardboard Biltong Maker and worked a new idea around that one.

Now, nine years later, thousands of people all over the world are making their own Biltong!

We could tell you some stories about some other products that we have shipped across the world but we will leave that for another newsletter!

So, it’s May and it’s our birthday, so we thought we had to do something special for our customers.

Since no-one will send us a present (he-he) we will give you something to celebrate about.

Here we go:

For the whole month of May this is what we will do for you!

Free to the first 25 customers only!!
(With an order for one of our two Home Biltong Makers)

  • A Wooden Biltong Cutter.
  • 1 kilogram of Safari Biltong Spice.
  • 1 500 gram packet of the following spices:

 

  • Country Boerewors Spice
  • Ouma’s Boerewors Spice
  • Burgher Boerwors Spice

 


Special discounts for Special customers!!


Free with all Biltong Maker orders placed

  • 20 special Biltong storage bags
  • A packet of our famous “Bobotie” Nice ‘n Spicy spices complete with recipe.

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Tip of the month


A tip about the use of the Biltong Maker

This contribution from Ruari Truter from Cape Town

I was given a HBM for Christmas and it has performed fantastically!
I have used your recipes and made a few of my own, and although no batch has been a disaster I have had a few ‘interesting’ batches.
But that’s the fun of it – I am improving although even the dog was a bit concerned with the Chili & Garlic batch ………

The reason I am writing is to tell you of a small issue with the machine, my solution and perhaps a suggestion of how to make the HBM even better!!

Every time I make a batch and hang it up, the box becomes a source of extreme fascination to the Dog, the Maid and my son Tiaan.

So once it is all hung up, the box gets moved, jogged, attacked or otherwise interfered with the way that only a four your old can manage ….

It wasn’t me Papa!

Not an issue apart from the fact that the biltong often falls off the hangers or rather the hangers slide off there perch.
Sometimes it doesn’t fall off, just slides into each other. I overcome this by putting a lump of ‘Blue Tack’ or similar sticky stuff to stop the hangers/bars moving. It stops the depredations of the family and leaves me to relax and not compulsively check on it every night (Well it means I don’t HAVE to – I still check it just to smell the wonderful biltong as it dries!).

My suggestion is to replace (Or add to) the shelf at the top with some form of corrugated metal to prevent the hangers moving.

Regards
Ruari Truter
Cape Town

(Thank you for your tip Ruari. The “Blue Tack” (or prestick perhaps) is a good idea. We will certainly look into solving the problem -Ed)

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Frequently asked questions


Every month we receive many questions from people all over the world. These questions may be about making Biltong or Boerewors but can also be totally unrelated to these subjects.

 


QUESTION

Hi Biltong Team,

I live in London and my flat is like most flats in London where the windows and doors etc. are closed most of the time.
Will the Biltong Maker stink out the flat?

Cheers
Steve

ANSWER

Hi Steve,

It depends what you mean by stinking out the flat.
We have many customers who operate their Biltongmaker in flats in London and elsewhere in the UK. All over the world in fact!

Of course it will smell of biltong being made. But, to me and many others, this is a nice smell.
No, it won’t stink out the flat but there will most definately be a biltong smell.

 



QUESTION

Hi Team,

Do you ship to my specific country?
(This question comes in daily -Ed)

ANSWER

We ship to every single country in the world and have been doing so since 1995.

Places we have shipped to in the past (and are shipping to every single day virtually)include, The UK, the Americas, the whole of Europe, the Eastern European countries and to countries as diverse as Estonia, Azerbaijan, Greenland, Alaska, Bermuda, Hong-Kong, Singapore, China and you name it, we have sent one of our Biltong Makers there.

 



QUESTION

How much will it cost to send a Biltong Maker to my country?
(This question comes up several times per day -Ed)

ANSWER

The easiest way to find out exactly how much it will cost you to buy and ship our products is to GO SHOPPING!

Enter our web site www.biltongmakers.com and start shopping.

When you are on the site just click on the shopping mall link.

This will take you to our “shop”.
Once there you can, like in a normal shop, start putting things in your shopping basket.

When you have finished making your selection(s) you proceed (click on) to the checkout.

On the Checkout Page you will see exactly what you are going to buy including the prices as well as the different shipping options and the cost thereof.

If at that stage you are happy with everything you can place your order.
Otherwise just leave the shop!

It’s as easy as that!

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Recipe corner


Those people who have never indulged in a “Bunny Chow” don’t know what they have missed.
For those of us who have, it is normally difficult to find a good recipe for it.

Here is one from the archives . . . . . . .

DURBS MINCE AND BEANS, CURRY BUNNY CHOW

The secret of a good Bunny Chow is to use the freshest white bread you can find, cut in half and hollowed out.
Be careful to leave enough crust (+- 2cm diameter should do) along the edges and at the base when you hollow the halves out, in order to prevent leakage when you pour in the curry.
Compress the dough from the insides of the bread just enough to form a nice “wall” to absorb the gravy.
Make sure to have a nice wet cloth handy or lots of servietes.

Do not mind people staring at you!!

Ingredients

  • 1 loaf bread, halved and hollowed (see above)
  • 250g mince, pre-fried until just no longer pink
  • 1 cup of kidney beans
  • 1 cup of sugar beans
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 small piece of fresh ginger, finely chopped
  • 1 table spoon curry (mild, medium or hot)
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 2 potatoes, cubed
  • 2 chopped onions, chopped
  • 1 carrot, grated
  • 1 litre beef stock made with a stock cube.
  • 1 pinch dry thyme
  • 3 bay leaves
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Method

    • Boil the kidney beans in the stock for about 30 minutes
    • Add the sugar beans and carrot
    • Simmer for about an hour
    • Gently fry onions until transparent
    • Add garlic, ginger and thyme to the onions
    • Keep frying for another minute or so
    • Add the curry
    • Stir gently for about three minutes
    • Add the mince, potatoes and bay leaves
    • Stir until everything is covered in the curry
    • Add the beans and the stock
    • Gently reduce the stock to about one third
    • Add salt and pepper to taste
    • Thicken gravy a bit with cornflour (if required)
    • Scoop curry into the bread
    • Leave for a minute or so for the bread to soak up some moisture

 

Then . . . . . . seek seclusion and go primitive!

(Recipe, complements Kel’s Kitchen)

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People comments


I just wanted everybody to know that it is so easy to make your own biltong with the Biltong Maker.
You don’t need special skills or to be South African to operate the biltong machine!

My friends thought I was a bit looney when ordering the machine. First of all “what does a Dane know about biltong” and secondly “you will probably use it once”.

Well, the machine arrived and it has not had a break since. Very soon I was running out of spices due to the same people’s appetite for my home made biltong.
I am very proud having received compliments like “this is the best biltong I have ever tasted”.
The secret must be in the spice mix as I used the quick biltong recipe.

So basically, anyone can make their own delicious home made biltong – so get your own machine so you can TASTE IT FOR YOURSELF!!!

Kind regards
Anne Rasmussen
Luxembourg



“I was delighted that such a compact gadget could produce biltong in a hygienic environment and to my own particular taste so quickly!

I enjoy dry, spicy and fat free biltong which was ready in four days! The one thing I did notice was that the meat must be correctly cut (much like steak).

A great biltong maker which will be enjoyed by us on a regular basis.

DAWN HARTLEY
Johannesburg



“Bringing a little bit of South Africa into Europe – even our non-South African friends are getting hooked!!”

GWENDY
Holland



Congratulations!!!

A First Class Web site with lots of yummy information.
I have lived in Munich (Germany) for the last 12 years and since starting making Biltong the quality of life has improved.

The beer is fantastic over here but Biltong was sadly non-existent. I have quite a fan club for the stuff now and find it hard to keep up with all the orders!

STEPHEN GIESSWEIN
Munich
Germany

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Around the World


This is one that every South African will like!

MRS BALL’S CHUTNEY
A story by Annel Lategan from women24

South Africans and expats alike love Mrs Ball’s Chutney.
Now Sarie magazine has discovered the history and the recipe of this culinary legend.

In the March 2004 edition of Sarie Magazine, writer André Le Roux uncovers the life story of Mrs. Ball and her secret chutney recipe. Here, with kind permission from Sarie, we let you in on the secret. For the full story and loads more wonderful reads, try to get the March 2004 edition of Sarie.

Although Mrs. Ball’s chutney is considered to be a truly South African product, the recipe, in reality, comes from Canada!

The name chutney was adopted from a Hindi word in India, chatni, meaning ‘made from fresh fruit and spices”. In South Africa it’s mainly used as a marinade and a sauce to accompany meat, curries and bobotie.

In 1865 Mrs. Ball was born as Amelia Alice Elizabeth Adkins in Fort Jackson, East London, the same town where her Canadian parents were stranded in 1852 on their way to Australia.

According to www.ballfamilyrecords.co.uk her father, Henry James Adkins, captain of the SS Quanza, and his wife, Sarah Spalding, left the coastal town, Nova Scotia in Canada for Australia. Although the boat was lost off the coast of East London, fortunately for future generations of South Africans, the captain, his wife and her chutney recipe survived.

It was here that their daughter, Amelia Adkins, was born thirteen years later. She married Herbert Saddleton Ball in Fort Jackson, and was thereafter known as Mrs. Ball.

Both Mrs. Ball and her sister, Florence (known as Aunt Flo) received the secret chutney recipe from their mother, who in turn got it from her mother. Aunt Flo also made the exact same chutney recipe – which she sold as Mrs. Adkins’ Chutney – the only difference being that almost no one bought it.

Edward Thomas Adkins Ball, Mrs. Ball’s grandson, explained to Sarie magazine that the difference in the recipes might have been in the sugar.

Mrs. Ball started making the chutney after she moved to Johannesburg with her husband and seven children. Her friends and family loved it so much that the business started blossoming on its own. The demand increased; Mrs Ball cooked and her husband bottled.

Home Industries started selling her chutney and by 1918 she sold about 24 bottles a day, which in the years to come grew to 8 000 bottles a day.

In 1921 the Ball family moved to Cape Town. After living in Kalk Bay and Diepriver they settled in Plumstead (where her husband took over the chutney cooking).

He died in 1935 and she moved to Fish Hoek where she continued to make chutney in her backyard with the help of her grandson, “Uncle Bob”. The business was later moved to Woodstock with twelve new workers.

In 1957/58 Mrs Ball’s chutney was exported to England for the first time.

In the early seventies, Brooke Bond Oxo bought over the business, which was later sold to Unifoods. Still owned by them today, Mrs. Ball’s chutney is being made in Johannesburg and exported to Germany, Britain, New Zealand and Australia.

Mrs. Ball died on 20 November 1962 at the age of 97. Uncle Bob believes she would have lived to see 100 if she wasn’t attacked a few years earlier. Apparently three youths assaulted her for a small purse of money while she was sitting on the stoep of her house in Fish Hoek. They threw her to the ground, and, unable to get up by herself, she was found lying there sometime later.

She could not be buried next to her husband in Plumstead due to rising water levels. Instead she was buried in Muizenberg, where her grave can still be visited today.

Mrs. Ball’s secret recipe.

Edward Ball, Mrs. Ball’s grandson scaled down this original recipe to make 18 bottles of (mild) chutney.

  • 612 g dried peaches
  • 238 g dried apricots
  • 3 litres brown wine vinegar
  • 2 1/2 kg white sugar
  • 500 g onions
  • 120 g salt
  • 75 g cayenne pepper
  • 1 to 2 litres of brown wine vinegar for soaking
  • About 2 litres of brown wine vinegar for mixing

The fruit should be left in the soaking vinegar overnight, then cooked in the same vinegar until soft. Drain. Put the fruit through a mill. Add the sugar (dissolved) and onions (minced) and cook in a pot with the brown wine vinegar. The amount of vinegar depends on the consistency: it should not be too runny or too thick, but have the same consistency as the end product you find in the bottle. Add spices and cook for one to two hours. Stir occasionally with a wooden spoon to prevent burning. Sterlize your bottles and spoon in the mixture.

That’s it – you’ve got Mrs Ball’s Chutney.

 

  • To make the chutney hot, add 75 g chopped chillies.
  • To make peach chutney, omit the apricots and use 850 g dried peaches instead.

 

A big thank you to Ludwig, Retha, Joanelle en Arno from Zevendreef 30-79, 6605 VB Wijchen, The Netherlands Tel: 024 358-6434 ludwig@everson.info – (Ed)

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Smile a While


Collect from Heaven?

This from Sharon Waddington.

My Aunt died this past January.
Citibank billed her for February and March for their monthly service charge on her credit card, and then added late fees and interest on the monthly charge.
The balance had been $0.00 but now was somewhere around $60.00.

I placed the following phone call to Citibank:

Me: “I am calling to tell you that she died in January.”
Citibank: “The account was never closed and the late fees and charges still apply.”
Me: “Maybe, you should turn it over to collections…”
Citibank: “Since it is 2 months past due, it already has been.”
Me: “So, what will they do when they find out she is dead?”
Citibank: “Either report her account to the frauds division, or report her to the credit bureau…maybe both!”
Me: “Do you think God will be mad at her?”
Citibank:“…excuse me …..?”
Me: “Did you just get what I was telling you…. the part about her being dead?”
Citibank: “Sir, you’ll have to speak to my supervisor!”
(Supervisor gets on the phone)
Me: “I’m calling to tell you, she died in January.”
Citibank: “The account was never closed and the late fees and charges still apply.”
Me: “You mean you want to collect from her estate?”
Citibank: “…..(stammer)”
Citibank: “Are you her lawyer?”
Me: “No, I’m her great nephew.” (Lawyer info given… )
Citibank: “Could you fax us a certificate of death?”
Me: “Sure.” (Fax number is given )
(After they get the fax. )
Citibank: “Our system just isn’t setup for death…”
Me: “Oh…”
Citibank: “I don’t know what more I can do to help…”
Me: “Well… if you figure it out, great! If not, you could just keep billing her…I suppose…don’t really think she will care….”
Citibank: “Well…the late fees and charges do still apply.”
Me: “‘Would you like her new billing address?”
Citibank: “That might help.”
Me: “(Odessa Memorial Cemetery …. Highway 129 and plot number given).
Citibank: “Sir, that’s a cemetery!”
Me: “What do you do with dead people on your planet?

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SportTalk


Rugby

Bull must lead Shark through Storm

April 30 2004 at 04:58AM
By Jacques van der Westhuizen

Is commitment dead, or just very rare, asks the television advertisement.

This is the same question South Africa’s rugby players will be asking themselves this weekend as they head into the penultimate round of Super 12.

After being shut out in spectacular fashion last weekend and slipping down the points table, South Africa’s leading teams are now fighting like at no other stage during the competition, to make the final four.

The bottom of the table game in Bloemfontein between the Cats and Reds on Saturday is of little importance, as a win for either will have absolutely no bearing on what happens at the jampacked top of the table where teams are as close as they’ve ever been in the competition’s history.

It all comes
down to
commitment
It’s only pride the Reds and Cats are playing for and only an avid fan would bet any money on who’ll take the spoils in this one. Both teams have played pretty horrible rugby this season and in Bloemfontein, who knows what is possible.

The Bulls, too, are basically out of semifinal contention, but a win for them against the high-riding Chiefs in Hamilton on Friday morning would do the Stormers and Sharks absolutely no harm in their quest to make the last four.

But only a huge effort from the men from Pretoria will be good enough. Rudy Joubert has relegated Derick Hougaard to the bench and gambled with Willem de Waal at flyhalf in a move that could boomerang badly. Sure Hougaard hasn’t set the world alight this year, but De Waal is nowhere near international class.

The Chiefs are thriving on their own success and a full five points collected on Friday will virtually guarantee them a spot in the playoffs.

Later on Friday evening it’s the turn of the Sharks, who have slid to sixth on the log after suffering two humiliating defeats in a row at home. They must try and forget the last fortnight and start playing decent rugby again. They face the Blues, who welcome back Carlos Spencer, in a match that will ultimately determine the Sharks’ fate in the competition.

Wins for the Brumbies, Chiefs, Waratahs and Crusaders this weekend and a third straight loss for the Sharks will leave them with no chance ahead of facing the Stormers next weekend.

But the Sharks, who can’t be any worse than they were last week, will be looking for five points against a side that has blown hot and cold all year. And then they’ll be hoping the Stormers hit back after last week’s disappointment in Hamilton and halt the late run by the Crusaders.

Gert Smal has selected all his experienced men in a bid to climb back up the ladder and be back in the playoff mix next weekend when they have to play the Sharks in Durban.

This final round-robin match may ultimately decide which of the Sharks or Bulls will represent South Africa in the final four. But for that to happen, a lot has got to go South Africa’s way this weekend.

So it all comes down to commitment. There are two rounds left with a lot of rugby still to be played. And as things have been going this year, no positive result for any team is guaranteed. It’s never been tighter going into the last two rounds and if South Africa’s teams want to be champions, it’s now the time to raise the bar and show it.

Let’s hope the Stormers and Sharks show some fighting spirit, and give themselves a chance of a semifinal place and then we can all enjoy what should be a thriller of a game in Durban next weekend.

This article was originally published on page 26 of The Star on April 30, 2004



Where can you watch rugby on TV?

Click here to find out where in most countries!

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The Competition


The winner of the April Competition

The winner of the April competition is Diana Gmur from Zurich in Switzerland.
Although we have many customers in Switzerland, this is the first time we have a winner there!
Well done and congratulations Diana, your semi-industrial hand Biltong Shredder is on its way to you!

Remember the following:

 

  • The monthly draw or competition is totally free to everyone.
  • You can enter as many times as you like.
  • You can only enter via the Competition link on our home page or by clicking here
  • All prizes are sent to the winners free of charge.

 

The prize for the May Competition

The winner for the competition for May will receive one of the fantastic RNA-5kg Home Biltong Makers and . . . . . . . 1kg of our pre-mixed biltong spice!!

Most of us now know the RNA-5kg Biltong Maker but, for those of you who don’t, please click here to read all about it

To enter the competition all you have to do is to visit our home page at www.biltongmakers.com and click on one of the two competition links.

The winners of all competitions are notified by email.

Some of the other prizes for the year

 

  • Biltongmakers
  • Biltong spices
  • Boerewors spices
  • Braai tool sets
  • Potjie Pots
  • Barbecues
  • Cadac Skottel Braais and………. much, much more!!!

 

So, don’t wait!

You can enter right now by clicking on the competition link on our home page.

 

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A free Biltong Maker!


It’s easy to earn a free Biltong Maker!

As a South African orientated web site we are constantly looking to contact more and more South Africans across the world.
Not only to tell them about how they can make their own Biltong but also to give them a chance to share their stories with other South Africans the world over.

So, here is your chance to help us.

If you know about a South African family or friend living near you or perhaps somewhere far away, why not tell them about us and then us about them.
Perhaps you can send us their email address so that we can mail them a copy of the newsletter.
If they like it they can stay on the mailing list, if not they can just let us know and we will remove them.

If the response we receive is large enough and directly due to your efforts you could be rewarded by receiving one of our products totally free of charge.

What an easy way to perhaps get your own Home Biltong Maker without having to pay a cent for it!

You can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com

Many people went to the trouble of submitting their friend’s and family’s names during April and we would like to thank all!
Keep them coming and you could soon be the proud owner of one of our fantastic biltong making machines!

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Budget account


If you are really aching for a nice piece of Billies and the funds are a bit tight don’t despair!

We realize that with a very strong South African currency at the moment the prices in other currencies have increased somewhat.

So we made a plan!

With our secure on-line payment facility through WorldPay (Bank of Scotland) you can also order your very own Home Biltong maker on your budget account.

You can then pay over 12 or 24 months as you wish.

With a bit of entrepreneurship you could start making Biltong and sell it to meet the monthly re-payments!
So, if you hesitated in the past you can now go to www.biltongmakers.com and follow the shopping mall link. It’s as easy as that!

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Let’s hear from you!


Let’s all try to contribute!

Many people are subscribing to this newsletter every day. Mostly they do so because they enjoy reading it and like to hear from people all over the world.

If you are one of our subscribers why don’t you write something yourself?

Just like you enjoy reading about what other people are up to, they might enjoy reading about you and your family.
Why not put pen to paper and tell us about anything interesting. About life in your part of the world, what you do and how you live. Perhaps something that happened to you.
You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask.

Perhaps you have some advice to give?
You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Of course it does not have to be about Biltong or food. Anything that is of interest is welcome!
Share it with other people around the world!

It would be so nice to hear from you!

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Boerewors in the Benelux


Boeries galore!!

Well, the 10th Freedom Day celebrations are over and we can take a breather.
I don’t think I ever want to see a piece of Boerewors again! Almost 500kg we made in the last couple of weeks!
We even had to ship 65kg to the embassy in Rome via overnight courier!

Click to me me biggerOne more batch next week and we will have ample fresh Boeries in our freezers to see us through for a while.

The price is still € 7.50 per kilogram for the smaller quantities under 50kg. Over 50kg it is € 6.50 when you come and fetch in Keerbergen and € 7.50 if we deliver to you. (Benelux only)

Please keep in mind that we also do Boerewors rolls and Potjiekos for up to 100 people as well as “Lamb-on-the-Spit” for functions. So if you are planning anything please let us know?

Interested parties can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com for details or phone us at +32 (16) 53.96.25.

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Potjie Pots in the Benelux

Click to me me bigger

We have three Potjie Pots left.
Two size 4 and one size 3 Pots. All the burners have gone

For those who are interested please call us at +32 (16) 53.96.25

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Previous issues of this Newsletter

 

You can click on the links below to view some of the previous issues of our newsletter.

September 2003
October 2003
November 2003
December 2003
Jan/Feb 2004
March 2004
April 2004


Subscribing and unsubscribing
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You can be included in this newsletter by clicking on the following link.
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April 2004

The Newsletter
April 2004

You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
If you do not wish to receive this newsletter you may unsubscribe at the bottom where you will find an automatic link. Your name will then be permanently deleted from our database.
If you, your family or your friends want to subscribe to the newsletter please click on this link. Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

In this Newsletter

Just click on any of the subjects to jump straight to it

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From the editor

Keerbergen
Belgium
April 1, 2004

Outside it can still be somber and cold. The noise of a windy March rain shower and the hail stones against the window don’t exactly point to the fact that spring is on the way.

And still!

When we, in between the rain showers, take a nice long walk, we can hear the happy “wietoewiet” from a couple of Kieviten.

Hearing that we know that spring can’t be far away!

The coming back of the Kievit heralds the start of the spring in the Low Lands.

There is this tradition in some of the northern provinces of Holland that once the first Kievit egg is found, spring has officially arrived. The person who finds this egg takes it to the Town hall where it is, with much ceremony, handed to the Queen’s representative of the province.

Well, it is so far!

The egg has been found and handed over, the trees and bushes are full of blossoms and the tulips, crocuses and a host of other flowers are adorning every garden you see. Our alarm clock is packed away because we are once again woken up with the birds singing in the trees outside our bedroom window.

I am looking forward to getting into the garden and start making it shipshape for the coming months.

All the old leaves from last year, all the branches that came of the trees during the winter and a host of other things have to be cleaned and taken away. The lawn (moss) has to be mowed, the driveway cleaned and the tables and chairs put back in the garden.

Even the cats (Miss Muffett and Mr Woolly) know that they can now stay out all night long, much to June’s horror!

Although we prefer the winter to the summer, this winter has been a long one. Towards February and March you really want it to be over with and wish for some warm sunshine on your body.

Last Sunday we changed to summer time and set our clocks forward by one hour. Strange to think that somehow you lost a whole hour of your life! They just took it! Resetting the clock is quite a job. You try to do this; clocks, watches, car clocks, mobile phones, microwaves, central heating, alarm clocks etc. etc. etc.
We had 17 in all!

With the summer on its way so is the new Boerewors season. Harry, our friendly butcher has been warned that we will be there full force for the next couple of Thursdays to make several fresh batches!

Last weekend Derek and Jeanine invited us to join them, the boys and Jeanine’s father Vic, in a little cottage in the Ardennen they had organized for the weekend. So, off we went on Saturday morning. All along the E314 and E25 to Liege and near a little town called Petites Tailles, just 50km north of Bastogne in the east of the country. It was lovely. A lot of fresh air and very cold! That did not bother us however because inside we had this huge open fire place, almost the size of a small room, that kept us nice and warm. Click to see me big!

It was nice to get away a bit and just to relax and do nothing.

Nice long walks with the boys through the forests and lots of boeries for supper and breakfast!

On the Sunday we drove into Bastogne where we visited the war museum from the second world war.
It is amazing how little one knows of what went on in Belgium during the war. There it was, all laid out, the whole history of “The battle of the Bulge”!
Between December 16, 1944 and late January 1945, 100 000 Germans and 80 000 Americans died in that part of the world. The Americans prevailed.

What a lot of history there is to be seen all over!

Coming back home we discovered that I had left the garage door wide open and the lights on! But, this is Belgium so everything was quite safe!
Derek left his back door wide open!

Well, it’s time to go.

I hope you all have a wonderful month and I’ll be back again in May.

Till next month,

Lo

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Points to Ponder

  • Conflict is inevitable, the source of all growth, and an absolute necessity if one is to be alive
  • There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so
  • What a piece of bread looks like depends on whether you are hungry or not
  • A world ends when its metaphor has died
  • Life is a swallow, theory a snail
  • What I kept, I lost. What I had, I spent. What I gave, I kept
  • In every circumstance of life, always strive to combine the useful with the agreeable

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They got it wrong!

Golf was invented in Scotland
Though a good Scot would contest it, there is some doubt about the generally accepted belief that golf was a Scottish invention. A form of the game has been knocking around the world for centuries.

The Romans had a sport called paganica, played with a bent stick and a leather ball filled with feathers, which is believed to have developed into golf.

There is also the ancient Dutch game of kolven, similar in name and technique to golf and often played on ice.

Still, there is no question that golf has been played in Scotland for a very long time.

A statue of King James II of Scotland, dated 1457, demanded that “fute-ball and golfe be utterly cryed down”. Presumably this was so that his subjects could spend their spare time in training for war!
A later King, James IV of Scotland (1488-1513), is probably the first authentically recorded golfer. His records included several entries for “golf clubbis and ballis”.

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Our Home Biltong Makers

A major restructuring
Due to the continuous long lead-time for the shipping of our Home Biltong Makers we are presently undertaking a major restructuring program. Once completed, the normal lead-time of around 14 days will then be reduced to a maximum of seven days.

This restructuring has become necessary due to the continued and unbelievable support from our customers across the world!

So, to those people who waited a relatively long time for their orders to arrive our sincere apologies. To those people who are still waiting for their orders; it will be there soon. We are working day and night to complete the shipping of all outstanding orders. Please bear with us.

The bottom line is that we never really expected so many people, all over the world, wanting to make their own Biltong.

Details of the Traditional 2kg Biltong Maker can be found here.
Details on the RNA-5kg machine can be found by clicking on this link.

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This month’s special offer

Freebies, Freebies, Freebies!!!


During the month of April we are giving away a number of Freebies with every Biltong Maker purchased!

  • A free packet Nice ‘n Spicy BOBOTIE Spices, complete with the full recipe on the back of the packet. Have a look at our Nice ‘n Spicy page by clicking here
  • In addition to the Bobotie spice you will also receive 20 free special Biltong storage bags with your Hbm order.

And…..
Our famous Safari Biltong Spice will only cost you R 55.00 per 500 gram during the whole month of April!!
That is a massive saving of R 20.00 on every 500 gram of spice you buy!!

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Tip of the month

Some tips about the meat for Biltong



Every day we get asked what type of meat should be used to make Biltong, how to cut it, how to store it. . . . . . . . .

Here are some of the answers.

The Meat
Biltong can be made from virtually any meat or venison, but remember, the better the cut and grade of the meat, the better the Biltong!

Silverside is perfect.
This cut of meat is called by many different names all over the world but it can be recognized by the “silvery” shine on the meat. It is part of the hind quarter of the beast.

Always use freshly cut meat. If at all possible do not use vacuum sealed meat.
Always slice the meat with the grain and use a very sharp knife for best results.

Slicing the meat
This is very important. The thicker the meat the longer it takes to dry. Aim for slices of anything up to 1cm in thickness.
Careful now, this needs a bit of concentration. While slicing, one inevitably tends to end up with the bottom of the strip being much thicker than the top. It is not like slicing bread! The trick is to start slicing thinly, and to carry on slicing till the strip of meat falls away. Do not hack at the meat, then stop to assess your progress, and slice further. You will end up with unattractive strips of meat covered in nicks and cuts.

Marinading the meat
When marinading the meat always put the thicker pieces at the bottom of the dish or tray with the thinner pieces at the top. ALWAYS use a cover to keep away any flies for hygienic purposes.

Hanging the meat
Always hang your meat in a dry, drafty area, free of insects and flies. If flies lay eggs on the meat you will end up with maggots and you can throw your biltong away!

Storing your Biltong
Biltong or smoked foods should be consumed within a week of preparation in order to avoid the possibility of mould, especially during wet and rainy periods or if you live in humid coastal areas.
If you want to keep biltong over an extended period, rather put some pieces into a plastic bag, suck out as much air as possible, seal, and freeze for months.
If mould should occur, it can be removed by wiping it of with a cloth which has been dampened with vinegar.

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Frequently asked questions

Every month we receive many questions from people all over the world. These questions may be about making Biltong or Boerewors but can also be totally unrelated to these subjects.

 


QUESTION

Dear Biltong Team,
I wonder if you can help. I live and work in the middle east where it is practically impossible ( and illegal) to get pork. Is it possible to make boerewors without pork and what could I use as a tasty alternative? I hope you can help

Karen

 


ANSWER

Dear Karen,

Thank you for your email!
We often make Boerewors without Pork. In fact most of last year was “No Pork in the Boeries” year. All we did was to leave out the Pork and only used beef.

A lot of people commented on how this was the best wors we ever made!

Just make sure that your 70/30% meat/fat ratio still applies.

 



QUESTION

Hi Team,

How many cups are there in a gram? Also, where can I get hold of a proper cooking conversion table?

 


ANSWER

The answer to both questions is simple.
We have a very nice cooking converter on the Biltongmakers.Com web site. Just click here to get to it!

 



QUESTION

Now here is one that crops up all the time and perhaps there is someone out there who can help!

As a child growing up in S.A., my father would bring home something he called, “Russian Sausage“. Much to my health conscious mother’s horror he would deep fry this wonderful treat. I recall it to be reddish in color, with a bit or sourness to it. Could you please tell me where I can get some and if it is the correct name.

We have no answer for this and wonder if there could be something similar? Perhaps it is called by a different name?

Anyone out there please help?

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Recipe corner


It is getting towards summer again in the Northern parts of this world and many Potjies will be dusted off, ready to be put to good use.

Here is a very nice Potjiekos recipe.

 

Mexican Chicken Potjie

If you enjoy Mexican food, you’ll not be able to refuse this chicken pot. It’s unique taste is mainly thanks to the mixture of herbs and spices and it’s so filling that nothing extra, besides a nice tossed salad, needs to be served with the pot.
It’s enough for 5 to 6 people and a size 3 pot is recommended.

Ingredients

  • 30ml Cooking oil
  • 2kg Chicken pieces
  • 5 Medium-sized onions, diced
  • 1 Green-chilli, seeded and diced
  • 250ml Water
  • 5 Carrots, peeled and sliced
  • 6 Medium potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 125ml Uncooked rice
  • 200g Frozen green peas
  • 15 Whole button mushrooms
  • 2 Tomatoes, diced
  • 10ml Dried parsley
  • 5ml Garlic flakes
  • 5ml Lemon pepper
  • 5ml Dried oreganum
  • 2.5ml Ground black-pepper
  • 1.25ml Peri-Peri powder
  • 125ml Dry white wine
  • 30ml Sugar
  • 20ml Salt
  • 15ml Medium curry powder
  • 1 cube Chicken stock, crumbled


Method

  • Heat the oil in the pot and braai the chicken, a few pieces at a time, until golden brown.
  • Remove and brown the onions and chilli until soft.
  • Replace the chicken and add the water.
  • Cover with the lid and allow to simmer for 15 minutes.
  • Layer the veggies and rice as they appear above and sprinkle the herbs and spices on top.
  • Cover with the lid and allow to simmer for another 15 minutes.
  • Mix the wine and the rest of the ingredients and pour over the food.
  • Cover with the lid and allow to simmer for 30 minutes or until the rice is done.
  • Give the pot a good stir before serving and. . . . .

Enjoy!

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People comments


Dear Lo,

The Mini 30kg Biltong cabinet has arrived intact by me in Tavistock, England and is running faultlessly, and producing excellent biltong! We are making so much Biltong there seems to be no time for anything else these days!!

I would like to thank you and the Biltong team for keeping me updated at all times and for being unfailingly courteous and helpful from start to finish. By such efficiency you and your team took the anxiety out of importing the cabinet over such a long distance.

It is good to find such personal service in a world of corporate anonymity.

Thanks again.

Kind regards,

Andrew Leviseur
Jeffreys Bay Biltong Ltd
Tavistock
United Kingdom
a.leviseur@ntlworld.com

(Perhaps all you biltong lovers can now contact Andrew for your so much longed for Biltong!! – Ed)

 



Hi Lo,

WOW !!!

If the Biltong is anywhere near your promptness and helpfulness it is going to be fantastic!
I will let you know how it turned out and am sure to still come back and trouble you with further queries as I start making “Versatile” biltong etc.

Many thanks

Stan Rodkin
PO Box 29157
SANDRINGHAM
2131
Direct Phone: +27 (11) 269-7777
Direct Fax: +27 (11) 269-7877
CellPhone: +27 (82) 904-1777
E-Mail : svr@enf.co.za

 



Hello there,

I am sure Kel knows well that he did not invent this style of biltong box, but merely re-made a very old idea. I have had a box like the one he claims to have invented for at least 20 years.
What do you say to that?

Lindsay Bethlehem
+27 (11) 485-2302
+27 (82) 337-5528


Editors comment

Oops!!

We were caught out there, weren’t we?

Of course we all know that Kel took a very old cardboard biltong box (the one with the light in it) and worked around that idea.
If he had not who would have?
Thanks to Kel’s idea all those people, all over the world craving biltong in the past, can now enjoy it.

Just like you and me.

(Ed)

(All our products are available on the web site www.biltongmakers.com – Ed)

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Around the World


The Saffies Down-Under column
By Craigh Rudolph in Sydney

Well the days are growing shorter and the sun is losing its bite. Summer in Sydney has been a bit kinder than last year with very few bush fires and a little more rain.

But still not enough.

Mandatory water restrictions are in place and the “Water Police” are out in the suburbs trying to catch people who are doing the wrong thing. But how do you stop migrants from the Mediterranean from watering their concrete and paved “gardens.”?
God forbid if they try using a broom to sweep the leaves away. Wasting water is much easier.

Sydney is full of the hype over the Olympic swimming trials. Wonder athletes are putting their best flippers forward to ensure they make the Greece games.
Ian Thorpe has inadvertently put a lot of pressure on a little known swimming colleague. Owing to Ian’s blunder on the starting blocks he was disqualified and, the only way for him to gain qualification for the game in the 400m Freestyle race, would be for Craig Stevens to withdraw and allow Ian Thorpe to take his place.

A bit sad that the youngster could possibly be saddled with the guilt that he could have allowed Ian Thorpe to win another gold medal in an event he has dominated for the past 4 years – watch this space.

Cricket has also finally come to an end (thank goodness) – I am sure they started playing this season about 12 months ago.

It just goes on and on.

There is just the odd mention of the Protea’s against New Zealand. Unfortunately no great heroics from the guys, but then again who ever plays well in a country that has only two months of warm weather every year. Pitches are never going to be dry and fast – one could only call them “putty-pitches” at best.

Fortunately though, three of the four Super Twelve Rugby Teams are holding their own despite the words of wisdom from rugby guru, David Campese.

At the beginning of the year he had written in one of the local Sydney papers that the bottom 5 sides of the competition will be dominated by South African sides and the Waikato Chiefs making up the numbers.

It’s funny you never here any of these so-called professors of the game admit they were wrong and concede any side, other than an Australian side, is playing well.

But I move on.

So with the demise of day-light saving over the last week-end in March, the walks now in the park at the end of a long day at the office are once again in the dark. By the time one gets home through the Sydney traffic and transport system, the day-light is well and truly fast asleep. However it is still wonderful to be able to go for these walks even though it is dark. The bats are still very busy gathering what blossoms and fruit they can steal before the winter weather starts to take its hold.

We have also this past week-end spent our time doing the “un-democratic” forced voting that makes up this Australian Democracy. If you do not vote, you can and will be fined A$100 – but I can understand why they have gone this way – Australia could end up being run by a fool like George Bush.

Long-live democracy!

Sydney has recently also had the Greek festival at Darling Harbour and the tastes and aromas, sites and people were wonderful. The Greek community in Sydney is prosperous and many. It is a delight to watch them live their traditions in a very cosmopolitan way, as many communities do in Sydney. I am in no doubt that in the future there will be a South African Festival of similar proportions as more and more expats make their way to this hospitable country.

Until next quarter, if you haven’t visited Sydney and Australia, it is well worth considering. The food is good and the weather is not that bad either.

Regards

Craig Rudolph

(Thank you so much for your column again Craig. Our readers really enjoy hearing from you! – (Ed)

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Smile a While

A new use for the Biltong Maker
Hi Lo

How about this for a new use for the biltong maker.

We have a couple of Spotted Dikkops (Latin name Burhinus Capensis) which are like large Plovers with a wide head (hence Dik Kop) which hatched two babies a few weeks ago.
They are night birds and run around our lawn at night chasing insects, but often don’t look where they are running.

During the day on Thursday I saw the two parents standing at the edge of our swimming pool staring at the water, so I went to investigate. One of the babies had fallen into the pool and was drowning, but I lifted it out, held it upside down by the legs to let the water drain out of its lungs and then gave it artificial respiration (gently, so that I did not crack its fragile ribs).

The two parents, which are usually very aggressive when anyone gets near their babies, just sat quietly on the grass watching what I was doing.
The baby eventually gave a few coughs and then started breathing normally. As it was very wet I tried drying it with my handkerchief, but it was still damp and was starting to shiver. I then phoned our animal rescue society to ask what else I should do. They said I must dry the bird gently with a soft towel and then put it under a lamp to warm up and dry out.

Of course, the bird would not sit still (it has very long, strong legs) and I did not have a cardboard box and lamp readily available, so I thought of the biltong maker!

I put a thin cloth at the bottom so that its feet would not get burnt, put the bird inside, put the lid on to stop it from jumping out, put a paint tin on top to keep the perforated lid on, then switched the maker on.
After about 15 minutes in the warm draught the baby bird had dried out sufficiently (I did not want to roast it alive!) so I took it out into the garden and handed it back to its parents. They all then went happily running back into the bushes, squawking merrily.

I am glad to say that today, after 5 days the baby bird is alive and healthy, back to normal!

Of course, I had to strip my biltong maker completely and clean it thoroughly with a disinfectant to get rid of any germs and the smell!

Kind regards

Bruce

Bruce Prescott
TRI (Pty) Ltd
South Africa
Tel: +27 (11) 463-3100
Fax: +27 (11) 463-3133
prescott@telkomsa.net

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The Sporty Column

Rugby

Butch’s perfect 10 in Bok form book

March 31, 2004
By Stephen Nell
(Cape Times rugby writer, convenor)

If the Super 12 form book is anything to go by, Sharks star Butch James will be wearing the Springbok No 10 jersey against Ireland in Bloemfontein on June 12.

James was a unanimous choice at flyhalf when a Cape Times rugby panel picked a South African Form XV at the halfway mark of the tournament.

The panellists – Mercury rugby scribe Mike Greenaway, former Springbok centre Brendan Venter and I – concentrated on current form.

The teams we picked did not take historic form or natural talent into account.

‘I want a flyhalf who can dictate like Derick’ It’s for this reason that Derick Hougaard finds himself out in the cold, and it will be interesting to see how Springbok coach Jake White manages the flyhalf situation.

Hougaard has been a non-entity on attack and will continue to be while he stands so deep.

But Venter made the point in our discussions that he would have no hesitation in picking the Bulls halfback pair of Fourie du Preez and Hougaard ahead of the Sharks’ Craig Davidson and James if he had to pick a Springbok team on the spot.

“If we want to move forward in the long term, we need a flyhalf who can run the show,” said Venter. “Butch is playing as well as he can. He’s trying hard to defend the right way, passing well and kicking miles out of hand. But I want a flyhalf who can dictate like Derick … He’s a general.”

Venter said Hougaard’s shortcomings would simply have to be addressed through coaching. “Derick is no threat on attack, so they will have to work on his positional play. He’s an explosive little character, but he’s standing too deep and far behind the scrum.”

With those deficiencies removed, Du Preez is likely to be the man on his inside. “Derick has the potential to make South Africa the best team in the world. He can kick the ball 70 metres,” said Venter.

“Fourie also has everything. He kicks the ball a mile into the air, and if you have a kicking game with those two, you will annihilate opponents.

“When you pick Fourie and Derick, you are going to play a certain style. The moment you play Bolla Conradie at scrumhalf, you have to pick another flyhalf, maybe André Pretorius. The bad news is that it doesn’t win a lot of Tests.”

At centre, the Stormers duo of De Wet Barry and Marius Joubert are wearing undisputed crowns. There have been noises about Bulls No 12 Ettienne Botha, but he was put in his place in their 25-11 defeat to the Stormers.

Indeed, derby matches of such magnitude have a way of showing who is who in the pecking order, so it’s a mystery as to why they are always being talked down by Springbok coaches.

Piet Krause was being written up as the next great Springbok loose forward – until he ran into Corné Krige, who has already retired from international rugby.

Some players may perform well at Super 12 level, but simply do not have the ability to take the step up. Krause belongs in that category. Conversely, the feeling persists that Hougaard has the ability to achieve that and an adjustment or two will make a big difference.

We were unanimous that Breyton Paulse and Ashwin Willemse have been the best South African wings. Willemse has enjoyed the occasional flash of brilliance in a dreadful Cats team and just shades the Sharks’ Henno Mentz.

At lock, all three panellists have credited AJ Venter for sparking the Sharks pack. He has physical presence and plays a big role in giving them forward momentum.

We were also unanimous that Luke Watson has been the form openside flank. Whether Watson’s cause is a lost one due to White’s insistence that Schalk Burger should play as a fetcher remains to be seen.

At loosehead prop, there has been none better than Stormers man Daan Human. He has been strong at the scrums and busy in the loose. It’s time to stop clinging to the memory of Os du Randt’s exploits in the mid-1990s. We are already heading into the mid-2000s.

Brent Russell has not stood out for any of the panellists when it came to picking a fullback. He scored a magnificent try against the Highlanders, but was poor for most of the game as he shied away from physical contact. Gaffie du Toit beat Werner Greeff by two votes to one.

At hooker, all three panellists have picked newly appointed Springbok captain John Smit, but he will have to maintain his form to fend off Bulls duo Gary Botha and Danie Coetzee.

Another unanimous choice was that of Bulls No 8 Anton Leonard. However, he will probably fall away when it comes to assessing Test-match qualities. The Stormers and Sharks dominate our South Africa Form XV, with Willemse the sole Cats player.

Clearly André Markgraaff, Allister Coetzee and White have some tough calls to make, especially as the multitude of talent in the Cats region with players such as Jaque Fourie and Juan Smith cannot simply be overlooked.

Panellists’ Teams (In the order No 1-15)

Stephen Nell
(Cape Times rugby writer, convenor)

  • Daan Human (Stormers)
  • John Smit (Sharks)
  • Eddie Andrews (Stormers)
  • AJ Venter (Sharks)
  • Victor Matfield (Bulls)
  • Luke Watson (Sharks)
  • Jacques Cronjé (Bulls)
  • Anton Leonard (Bulls)
  • Craig Davidson (Sharks)
  • Butch James (Sharks)
  • Ashwin Willemse (Cats)
  • De Wet Barry (Stormers)
  • Marius Joubert (Stormers)
  • Breyton Paulse (Stormers)
  • Gaffie du Toit (Stormers)

Breakdown:
Stormers 6, Sharks 5, Bulls 3, Cats 1.



Brendan Venter
(Former Springbok centre and London Irish coach)

  • Daan Human (Stormers)
  • John Smit (Sharks)
  • Eddie Andrews (Stormers)
  • AJ Venter (Sharks)
  • Selborne Boome (Stormers)
  • Luke Watson (Sharks)
  • Schalk Burger (Stormers)
  • Anton Leonard (Bulls)
  • Craig Davidson (Sharks)
  • Butch James (Sharks)
  • Ashwin Willemse (Cats)
  • De Wet Barry (Stormers)
  • Marius Joubert (Stormers)
  • Breyton Paulse (Stormers)
  • Gaffie du Toit (Stormers).

Breakdown:
Stormers 8, Sharks 5, Bulls 1, Cats 1.



Mike Greenaway
(Mercury rugby writer)

  • Daan Human (Stormers)
  • John Smit (Sharks)
  • BJ Botha (Sharks)
  • AJ Venter (Sharks)
  • Victor Matfield (Bulls)
  • Luke Watson (Sharks)
  • Jacques Cronjé (Bulls)
  • Anton Leonard (Bulls)
  • Craig Davidson (Sharks)
  • Butch James (Sharks)
  • Ashwin Willemse (Cats)
  • De Wet Barry (Stormers)
  • Marius Joubert (Stormers)
  • Breyton Paulse (Stormers)
  • Werner Greeff (Stormers)

Breakdown:
Sharks 6, Stormers 5, Bulls 3, Cats 1.

(This article was originally published on page 17 of The Cape Times on March 31, 2004)

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The Competition

The winner of the March Competition

We certainly had some people ripping the bottom out of our invitation that you can enter as many times as you like.
A couple of people must have programmed their systems in such a way that they kept on sending in entries all day and all night.

The idea of the competition is that it is a fun thing and everybody should have a fair chance to win. In the end it is the computer that chooses the winner.

So, let’s keep it a fun thing and not misuse it.

The winner of the March competition is Charles Cook from Kelvin in Sandton, Johannesburg. It is not often that we have a South African winner and we look forward to hearing from Charles what his friends have to say about his newly acquired Braai Utensil Kit.

Congratulations Charles, your Braai Utensil Kit is on its way to you!

Remember the following:

 

  • The monthly draw or competition is totally free to everyone.
  • You can enter as many times as you like.
  • You can only enter via the Competition link on our home page or by clicking here
  • All prizes are sent to the winner free of charge.

 

The prize for the April Competition

The winner for the competition for April will receive one of our Manual Semi-Industrial Biltong Cutters (See the picture on the competition page).
This cutter makes it very easy to slice or shred your biltong.

To enter the competition all you have to do is to visit our home page at www.biltongmakers.com and click on one of the two competition links.

The winner of all competitions is notified by email.

Some of the other prizes for the year

 

  • Biltongmakers
  • Biltong spices
  • Boerewors spices
  • Braai tool sets
  • Potjie Pots
  • Barbecues
  • Cadac Skottel Braais and………. much, much more!!!

 

So, don’t wait!

You can enter right now by clicking on the competition link on our home page.

 

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A free Biltong Maker!

It’s easy to earn a free Biltong Maker!

As a South African orientated web site we are constantly looking to contact more and more South Africans across the world.
Not only to tell them about how they can make their own Biltong but also to give them a chance to share their stories with other South Africans the world over.

So, here is your chance to help us.

If you know about a South African family or friend living near you or perhaps somewhere far away, why not tell them about us and then us about them.
Perhaps you can send us their email address so that we can mail them a copy of the newsletter.
If they like it they can stay on the mailing list, if not they can just let us know and we will remove them.

If the response we receive is large enough and directly due to your efforts you could be rewarded by receiving one of our products totally free of charge.

What an easy way to perhaps get your own Home Biltong Maker without having to pay a cent for it!

You can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com

(We received a lot of referrals during February and March and would like to thank all those who went to the trouble – Ed)

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Budget account

If you are really aching for a nice piece of Billies and the funds are a bit tight don’t despair!

We realize that with a very strong South African currency at the moment the prices have gone through the roof.

So we made a plan!

With our secure on-line payment facility through WorldPay (Bank of Scotland) you can also order your very own Home Biltong maker on your budget account.

You can then pay over 12 or 24 months as you wish.

With a bit of entrepreneurship you could start making Biltong and sell it to meet the monthly re-payments!
So, if you hesitated in the past you can now go to www.biltongmakers.com and follow the shopping mall link. It’s as easy as that!

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Let’s hear from you!

If you have something interesting to tell, a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask, it would be nice to hear from you!

Perhaps you have some advice to give?

You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Of course it does not have to be about Biltong or food. Anything that is of interest is welcome! Share it with other people around the world!

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Boerewors in the Benelux

The time has come and this month we will be making our first batches of Boerewors.

Click to me me biggerSince our little reminder during March we have already received many advance orders especially for the 10th year anniversay of the Freedom Day Celebrations at the end of the month. It might be an idea to have a look at what you are planning and let us know well in advance what quantities you will need.

Better safe than sorry!!

We have decided to try to keep the price at € 7.50 per kilogram for as long as possible this year. No promises though, we never know what the abattoir will charge next!
It might be interesting to keep in mind that we also do Boerewors rolls, Potjiekos for up to 100 people and Lamb-on-the-Spit for functions. So if you are planning anything please let us know?
More about that soon.

Interested parties can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com for details or phone us at +32 (16) 53.96.25.

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Potjie Pots in the Benelux

Click to me me biggerWe have a couple of size 3 and 4 Potjie Pots as well as some Gas Burners in stock in Belgium.

The burners are ideal for these size Potjies and will save a lot of hassle as far as the making of a fire is concerned.

The real and only way to create some “ambiance” is of course to have a real fire but for those people who are in a hurry this is ideal!

For those who are interested please call us at +32 (16) 53.96.25

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Previous issues of this Newsletter


You can click on the links below to view some of the previous issues of our newsletter.

September 2003
October 2003
November 2003
December 2003
Jan/Feb 2004
March 2004


Subscribing and unsubscribing
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March 2004

The Newsletter
April 2004

You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
If you do not wish to receive this newsletter you may unsubscribe at the bottom where you will find an automatic link. Your name will then be permanently deleted from our database.
If you, your family or your friends want to subscribe to the newsletter please click on this link. Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

In this Newsletter

Just click on any of the subjects to jump straight to it

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From the editor

Keerbergen
Belgium
April 1, 2004

Outside it can still be somber and cold. The noise of a windy March rain shower and the hail stones against the window don’t exactly point to the fact that spring is on the way.

And still!

When we, in between the rain showers, take a nice long walk, we can hear the happy “wietoewiet” from a couple of Kieviten.

Hearing that we know that spring can’t be far away!

The coming back of the Kievit heralds the start of the spring in the Low Lands.

There is this tradition in some of the northern provinces of Holland that once the first Kievit egg is found, spring has officially arrived. The person who finds this egg takes it to the Town hall where it is, with much ceremony, handed to the Queen’s representative of the province.

Well, it is so far!

The egg has been found and handed over, the trees and bushes are full of blossoms and the tulips, crocuses and a host of other flowers are adorning every garden you see. Our alarm clock is packed away because we are once again woken up with the birds singing in the trees outside our bedroom window.

I am looking forward to getting into the garden and start making it shipshape for the coming months.

All the old leaves from last year, all the branches that came of the trees during the winter and a host of other things have to be cleaned and taken away. The lawn (moss) has to be mowed, the driveway cleaned and the tables and chairs put back in the garden.

Even the cats (Miss Muffett and Mr Woolly) know that they can now stay out all night long, much to June’s horror!

Although we prefer the winter to the summer, this winter has been a long one. Towards February and March you really want it to be over with and wish for some warm sunshine on your body.

Last Sunday we changed to summer time and set our clocks forward by one hour. Strange to think that somehow you lost a whole hour of your life! They just took it! Resetting the clock is quite a job. You try to do this; clocks, watches, car clocks, mobile phones, microwaves, central heating, alarm clocks etc. etc. etc.
We had 17 in all!

With the summer on its way so is the new Boerewors season. Harry, our friendly butcher has been warned that we will be there full force for the next couple of Thursdays to make several fresh batches!

Last weekend Derek and Jeanine invited us to join them, the boys and Jeanine’s father Vic, in a little cottage in the Ardennen they had organized for the weekend. So, off we went on Saturday morning. All along the E314 and E25 to Liege and near a little town called Petites Tailles, just 50km north of Bastogne in the east of the country. It was lovely. A lot of fresh air and very cold! That did not bother us however because inside we had this huge open fire place, almost the size of a small room, that kept us nice and warm. Click to see me big!

It was nice to get away a bit and just to relax and do nothing.

Nice long walks with the boys through the forests and lots of boeries for supper and breakfast!

On the Sunday we drove into Bastogne where we visited the war museum from the second world war.
It is amazing how little one knows of what went on in Belgium during the war. There it was, all laid out, the whole history of “The battle of the Bulge”!
Between December 16, 1944 and late January 1945, 100 000 Germans and 80 000 Americans died in that part of the world. The Americans prevailed.

What a lot of history there is to be seen all over!

Coming back home we discovered that I had left the garage door wide open and the lights on! But, this is Belgium so everything was quite safe!
Derek left his back door wide open!

Well, it’s time to go.

I hope you all have a wonderful month and I’ll be back again in May.

Till next month,

Lo

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Points to Ponder

  • Conflict is inevitable, the source of all growth, and an absolute necessity if one is to be alive
  • There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so
  • What a piece of bread looks like depends on whether you are hungry or not
  • A world ends when its metaphor has died
  • Life is a swallow, theory a snail
  • What I kept, I lost. What I had, I spent. What I gave, I kept
  • In every circumstance of life, always strive to combine the useful with the agreeable

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They got it wrong!

Golf was invented in Scotland
Though a good Scot would contest it, there is some doubt about the generally accepted belief that golf was a Scottish invention. A form of the game has been knocking around the world for centuries.

The Romans had a sport called paganica, played with a bent stick and a leather ball filled with feathers, which is believed to have developed into golf.

There is also the ancient Dutch game of kolven, similar in name and technique to golf and often played on ice.

Still, there is no question that golf has been played in Scotland for a very long time.

A statue of King James II of Scotland, dated 1457, demanded that “fute-ball and golfe be utterly cryed down”. Presumably this was so that his subjects could spend their spare time in training for war!
A later King, James IV of Scotland (1488-1513), is probably the first authentically recorded golfer. His records included several entries for “golf clubbis and ballis”.

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Our Home Biltong Makers

A major restructuring
Due to the continuous long lead-time for the shipping of our Home Biltong Makers we are presently undertaking a major restructuring program. Once completed, the normal lead-time of around 14 days will then be reduced to a maximum of seven days.

This restructuring has become necessary due to the continued and unbelievable support from our customers across the world!

So, to those people who waited a relatively long time for their orders to arrive our sincere apologies. To those people who are still waiting for their orders; it will be there soon. We are working day and night to complete the shipping of all outstanding orders. Please bear with us.

The bottom line is that we never really expected so many people, all over the world, wanting to make their own Biltong.

Details of the Traditional 2kg Biltong Maker can be found here.
Details on the RNA-5kg machine can be found by clicking on this link.

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This month’s special offer

Freebies, Freebies, Freebies!!!


During the month of April we are giving away a number of Freebies with every Biltong Maker purchased!

  • A free packet Nice ‘n Spicy BOBOTIE Spices, complete with the full recipe on the back of the packet. Have a look at our Nice ‘n Spicy page by clicking here
  • In addition to the Bobotie spice you will also receive 20 free special Biltong storage bags with your Hbm order.

And…..
Our famous Safari Biltong Spice will only cost you R 55.00 per 500 gram during the whole month of April!!
That is a massive saving of R 20.00 on every 500 gram of spice you buy!!

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Tip of the month

Some tips about the meat for Biltong



Every day we get asked what type of meat should be used to make Biltong, how to cut it, how to store it. . . . . . . . .

Here are some of the answers.

The Meat
Biltong can be made from virtually any meat or venison, but remember, the better the cut and grade of the meat, the better the Biltong!

Silverside is perfect.
This cut of meat is called by many different names all over the world but it can be recognized by the “silvery” shine on the meat. It is part of the hind quarter of the beast.

Always use freshly cut meat. If at all possible do not use vacuum sealed meat.
Always slice the meat with the grain and use a very sharp knife for best results.

Slicing the meat
This is very important. The thicker the meat the longer it takes to dry. Aim for slices of anything up to 1cm in thickness.
Careful now, this needs a bit of concentration. While slicing, one inevitably tends to end up with the bottom of the strip being much thicker than the top. It is not like slicing bread! The trick is to start slicing thinly, and to carry on slicing till the strip of meat falls away. Do not hack at the meat, then stop to assess your progress, and slice further. You will end up with unattractive strips of meat covered in nicks and cuts.

Marinading the meat
When marinading the meat always put the thicker pieces at the bottom of the dish or tray with the thinner pieces at the top. ALWAYS use a cover to keep away any flies for hygienic purposes.

Hanging the meat
Always hang your meat in a dry, drafty area, free of insects and flies. If flies lay eggs on the meat you will end up with maggots and you can throw your biltong away!

Storing your Biltong
Biltong or smoked foods should be consumed within a week of preparation in order to avoid the possibility of mould, especially during wet and rainy periods or if you live in humid coastal areas.
If you want to keep biltong over an extended period, rather put some pieces into a plastic bag, suck out as much air as possible, seal, and freeze for months.
If mould should occur, it can be removed by wiping it of with a cloth which has been dampened with vinegar.

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Frequently asked questions

Every month we receive many questions from people all over the world. These questions may be about making Biltong or Boerewors but can also be totally unrelated to these subjects.

 


QUESTION

Dear Biltong Team,
I wonder if you can help. I live and work in the middle east where it is practically impossible ( and illegal) to get pork. Is it possible to make boerewors without pork and what could I use as a tasty alternative? I hope you can help

Karen

 


ANSWER

Dear Karen,

Thank you for your email!
We often make Boerewors without Pork. In fact most of last year was “No Pork in the Boeries” year. All we did was to leave out the Pork and only used beef.

A lot of people commented on how this was the best wors we ever made!

Just make sure that your 70/30% meat/fat ratio still applies.

 



QUESTION

Hi Team,

How many cups are there in a gram? Also, where can I get hold of a proper cooking conversion table?

 


ANSWER

The answer to both questions is simple.
We have a very nice cooking converter on the Biltongmakers.Com web site. Just click here to get to it!

 



QUESTION

Now here is one that crops up all the time and perhaps there is someone out there who can help!

As a child growing up in S.A., my father would bring home something he called, “Russian Sausage“. Much to my health conscious mother’s horror he would deep fry this wonderful treat. I recall it to be reddish in color, with a bit or sourness to it. Could you please tell me where I can get some and if it is the correct name.

We have no answer for this and wonder if there could be something similar? Perhaps it is called by a different name?

Anyone out there please help?

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Recipe corner


It is getting towards summer again in the Northern parts of this world and many Potjies will be dusted off, ready to be put to good use.

Here is a very nice Potjiekos recipe.

 

Mexican Chicken Potjie

If you enjoy Mexican food, you’ll not be able to refuse this chicken pot. It’s unique taste is mainly thanks to the mixture of herbs and spices and it’s so filling that nothing extra, besides a nice tossed salad, needs to be served with the pot.
It’s enough for 5 to 6 people and a size 3 pot is recommended.

Ingredients

  • 30ml Cooking oil
  • 2kg Chicken pieces
  • 5 Medium-sized onions, diced
  • 1 Green-chilli, seeded and diced
  • 250ml Water
  • 5 Carrots, peeled and sliced
  • 6 Medium potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 125ml Uncooked rice
  • 200g Frozen green peas
  • 15 Whole button mushrooms
  • 2 Tomatoes, diced
  • 10ml Dried parsley
  • 5ml Garlic flakes
  • 5ml Lemon pepper
  • 5ml Dried oreganum
  • 2.5ml Ground black-pepper
  • 1.25ml Peri-Peri powder
  • 125ml Dry white wine
  • 30ml Sugar
  • 20ml Salt
  • 15ml Medium curry powder
  • 1 cube Chicken stock, crumbled


Method

  • Heat the oil in the pot and braai the chicken, a few pieces at a time, until golden brown.
  • Remove and brown the onions and chilli until soft.
  • Replace the chicken and add the water.
  • Cover with the lid and allow to simmer for 15 minutes.
  • Layer the veggies and rice as they appear above and sprinkle the herbs and spices on top.
  • Cover with the lid and allow to simmer for another 15 minutes.
  • Mix the wine and the rest of the ingredients and pour over the food.
  • Cover with the lid and allow to simmer for 30 minutes or until the rice is done.
  • Give the pot a good stir before serving and. . . . .

Enjoy!

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People comments


Dear Lo,

The Mini 30kg Biltong cabinet has arrived intact by me in Tavistock, England and is running faultlessly, and producing excellent biltong! We are making so much Biltong there seems to be no time for anything else these days!!

I would like to thank you and the Biltong team for keeping me updated at all times and for being unfailingly courteous and helpful from start to finish. By such efficiency you and your team took the anxiety out of importing the cabinet over such a long distance.

It is good to find such personal service in a world of corporate anonymity.

Thanks again.

Kind regards,

Andrew Leviseur
Jeffreys Bay Biltong Ltd
Tavistock
United Kingdom
a.leviseur@ntlworld.com

(Perhaps all you biltong lovers can now contact Andrew for your so much longed for Biltong!! – Ed)

 



Hi Lo,

WOW !!!

If the Biltong is anywhere near your promptness and helpfulness it is going to be fantastic!
I will let you know how it turned out and am sure to still come back and trouble you with further queries as I start making “Versatile” biltong etc.

Many thanks

Stan Rodkin
PO Box 29157
SANDRINGHAM
2131
Direct Phone: +27 (11) 269-7777
Direct Fax: +27 (11) 269-7877
CellPhone: +27 (82) 904-1777
E-Mail : svr@enf.co.za

 



Hello there,

I am sure Kel knows well that he did not invent this style of biltong box, but merely re-made a very old idea. I have had a box like the one he claims to have invented for at least 20 years.
What do you say to that?

Lindsay Bethlehem
+27 (11) 485-2302
+27 (82) 337-5528


Editors comment

Oops!!

We were caught out there, weren’t we?

Of course we all know that Kel took a very old cardboard biltong box (the one with the light in it) and worked around that idea.
If he had not who would have?
Thanks to Kel’s idea all those people, all over the world craving biltong in the past, can now enjoy it.

Just like you and me.

(Ed)

(All our products are available on the web site www.biltongmakers.com – Ed)

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Around the World


The Saffies Down-Under column
By Craigh Rudolph in Sydney

Well the days are growing shorter and the sun is losing its bite. Summer in Sydney has been a bit kinder than last year with very few bush fires and a little more rain.

But still not enough.

Mandatory water restrictions are in place and the “Water Police” are out in the suburbs trying to catch people who are doing the wrong thing. But how do you stop migrants from the Mediterranean from watering their concrete and paved “gardens.”?
God forbid if they try using a broom to sweep the leaves away. Wasting water is much easier.

Sydney is full of the hype over the Olympic swimming trials. Wonder athletes are putting their best flippers forward to ensure they make the Greece games.
Ian Thorpe has inadvertently put a lot of pressure on a little known swimming colleague. Owing to Ian’s blunder on the starting blocks he was disqualified and, the only way for him to gain qualification for the game in the 400m Freestyle race, would be for Craig Stevens to withdraw and allow Ian Thorpe to take his place.

A bit sad that the youngster could possibly be saddled with the guilt that he could have allowed Ian Thorpe to win another gold medal in an event he has dominated for the past 4 years – watch this space.

Cricket has also finally come to an end (thank goodness) – I am sure they started playing this season about 12 months ago.

It just goes on and on.

There is just the odd mention of the Protea’s against New Zealand. Unfortunately no great heroics from the guys, but then again who ever plays well in a country that has only two months of warm weather every year. Pitches are never going to be dry and fast – one could only call them “putty-pitches” at best.

Fortunately though, three of the four Super Twelve Rugby Teams are holding their own despite the words of wisdom from rugby guru, David Campese.

At the beginning of the year he had written in one of the local Sydney papers that the bottom 5 sides of the competition will be dominated by South African sides and the Waikato Chiefs making up the numbers.

It’s funny you never here any of these so-called professors of the game admit they were wrong and concede any side, other than an Australian side, is playing well.

But I move on.

So with the demise of day-light saving over the last week-end in March, the walks now in the park at the end of a long day at the office are once again in the dark. By the time one gets home through the Sydney traffic and transport system, the day-light is well and truly fast asleep. However it is still wonderful to be able to go for these walks even though it is dark. The bats are still very busy gathering what blossoms and fruit they can steal before the winter weather starts to take its hold.

We have also this past week-end spent our time doing the “un-democratic” forced voting that makes up this Australian Democracy. If you do not vote, you can and will be fined A$100 – but I can understand why they have gone this way – Australia could end up being run by a fool like George Bush.

Long-live democracy!

Sydney has recently also had the Greek festival at Darling Harbour and the tastes and aromas, sites and people were wonderful. The Greek community in Sydney is prosperous and many. It is a delight to watch them live their traditions in a very cosmopolitan way, as many communities do in Sydney. I am in no doubt that in the future there will be a South African Festival of similar proportions as more and more expats make their way to this hospitable country.

Until next quarter, if you haven’t visited Sydney and Australia, it is well worth considering. The food is good and the weather is not that bad either.

Regards

Craig Rudolph

(Thank you so much for your column again Craig. Our readers really enjoy hearing from you! – (Ed)

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Smile a While

A new use for the Biltong Maker
Hi Lo

How about this for a new use for the biltong maker.

We have a couple of Spotted Dikkops (Latin name Burhinus Capensis) which are like large Plovers with a wide head (hence Dik Kop) which hatched two babies a few weeks ago.
They are night birds and run around our lawn at night chasing insects, but often don’t look where they are running.

During the day on Thursday I saw the two parents standing at the edge of our swimming pool staring at the water, so I went to investigate. One of the babies had fallen into the pool and was drowning, but I lifted it out, held it upside down by the legs to let the water drain out of its lungs and then gave it artificial respiration (gently, so that I did not crack its fragile ribs).

The two parents, which are usually very aggressive when anyone gets near their babies, just sat quietly on the grass watching what I was doing.
The baby eventually gave a few coughs and then started breathing normally. As it was very wet I tried drying it with my handkerchief, but it was still damp and was starting to shiver. I then phoned our animal rescue society to ask what else I should do. They said I must dry the bird gently with a soft towel and then put it under a lamp to warm up and dry out.

Of course, the bird would not sit still (it has very long, strong legs) and I did not have a cardboard box and lamp readily available, so I thought of the biltong maker!

I put a thin cloth at the bottom so that its feet would not get burnt, put the bird inside, put the lid on to stop it from jumping out, put a paint tin on top to keep the perforated lid on, then switched the maker on.
After about 15 minutes in the warm draught the baby bird had dried out sufficiently (I did not want to roast it alive!) so I took it out into the garden and handed it back to its parents. They all then went happily running back into the bushes, squawking merrily.

I am glad to say that today, after 5 days the baby bird is alive and healthy, back to normal!

Of course, I had to strip my biltong maker completely and clean it thoroughly with a disinfectant to get rid of any germs and the smell!

Kind regards

Bruce

Bruce Prescott
TRI (Pty) Ltd
South Africa
Tel: +27 (11) 463-3100
Fax: +27 (11) 463-3133
prescott@telkomsa.net

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The Sporty Column

Rugby

Butch’s perfect 10 in Bok form book

March 31, 2004
By Stephen Nell
(Cape Times rugby writer, convenor)

If the Super 12 form book is anything to go by, Sharks star Butch James will be wearing the Springbok No 10 jersey against Ireland in Bloemfontein on June 12.

James was a unanimous choice at flyhalf when a Cape Times rugby panel picked a South African Form XV at the halfway mark of the tournament.

The panellists – Mercury rugby scribe Mike Greenaway, former Springbok centre Brendan Venter and I – concentrated on current form.

The teams we picked did not take historic form or natural talent into account.

‘I want a flyhalf who can dictate like Derick’ It’s for this reason that Derick Hougaard finds himself out in the cold, and it will be interesting to see how Springbok coach Jake White manages the flyhalf situation.

Hougaard has been a non-entity on attack and will continue to be while he stands so deep.

But Venter made the point in our discussions that he would have no hesitation in picking the Bulls halfback pair of Fourie du Preez and Hougaard ahead of the Sharks’ Craig Davidson and James if he had to pick a Springbok team on the spot.

“If we want to move forward in the long term, we need a flyhalf who can run the show,” said Venter. “Butch is playing as well as he can. He’s trying hard to defend the right way, passing well and kicking miles out of hand. But I want a flyhalf who can dictate like Derick … He’s a general.”

Venter said Hougaard’s shortcomings would simply have to be addressed through coaching. “Derick is no threat on attack, so they will have to work on his positional play. He’s an explosive little character, but he’s standing too deep and far behind the scrum.”

With those deficiencies removed, Du Preez is likely to be the man on his inside. “Derick has the potential to make South Africa the best team in the world. He can kick the ball 70 metres,” said Venter.

“Fourie also has everything. He kicks the ball a mile into the air, and if you have a kicking game with those two, you will annihilate opponents.

“When you pick Fourie and Derick, you are going to play a certain style. The moment you play Bolla Conradie at scrumhalf, you have to pick another flyhalf, maybe André Pretorius. The bad news is that it doesn’t win a lot of Tests.”

At centre, the Stormers duo of De Wet Barry and Marius Joubert are wearing undisputed crowns. There have been noises about Bulls No 12 Ettienne Botha, but he was put in his place in their 25-11 defeat to the Stormers.

Indeed, derby matches of such magnitude have a way of showing who is who in the pecking order, so it’s a mystery as to why they are always being talked down by Springbok coaches.

Piet Krause was being written up as the next great Springbok loose forward – until he ran into Corné Krige, who has already retired from international rugby.

Some players may perform well at Super 12 level, but simply do not have the ability to take the step up. Krause belongs in that category. Conversely, the feeling persists that Hougaard has the ability to achieve that and an adjustment or two will make a big difference.

We were unanimous that Breyton Paulse and Ashwin Willemse have been the best South African wings. Willemse has enjoyed the occasional flash of brilliance in a dreadful Cats team and just shades the Sharks’ Henno Mentz.

At lock, all three panellists have credited AJ Venter for sparking the Sharks pack. He has physical presence and plays a big role in giving them forward momentum.

We were also unanimous that Luke Watson has been the form openside flank. Whether Watson’s cause is a lost one due to White’s insistence that Schalk Burger should play as a fetcher remains to be seen.

At loosehead prop, there has been none better than Stormers man Daan Human. He has been strong at the scrums and busy in the loose. It’s time to stop clinging to the memory of Os du Randt’s exploits in the mid-1990s. We are already heading into the mid-2000s.

Brent Russell has not stood out for any of the panellists when it came to picking a fullback. He scored a magnificent try against the Highlanders, but was poor for most of the game as he shied away from physical contact. Gaffie du Toit beat Werner Greeff by two votes to one.

At hooker, all three panellists have picked newly appointed Springbok captain John Smit, but he will have to maintain his form to fend off Bulls duo Gary Botha and Danie Coetzee.

Another unanimous choice was that of Bulls No 8 Anton Leonard. However, he will probably fall away when it comes to assessing Test-match qualities. The Stormers and Sharks dominate our South Africa Form XV, with Willemse the sole Cats player.

Clearly André Markgraaff, Allister Coetzee and White have some tough calls to make, especially as the multitude of talent in the Cats region with players such as Jaque Fourie and Juan Smith cannot simply be overlooked.

Panellists’ Teams (In the order No 1-15)

Stephen Nell
(Cape Times rugby writer, convenor)

  • Daan Human (Stormers)
  • John Smit (Sharks)
  • Eddie Andrews (Stormers)
  • AJ Venter (Sharks)
  • Victor Matfield (Bulls)
  • Luke Watson (Sharks)
  • Jacques Cronjé (Bulls)
  • Anton Leonard (Bulls)
  • Craig Davidson (Sharks)
  • Butch James (Sharks)
  • Ashwin Willemse (Cats)
  • De Wet Barry (Stormers)
  • Marius Joubert (Stormers)
  • Breyton Paulse (Stormers)
  • Gaffie du Toit (Stormers)

Breakdown:
Stormers 6, Sharks 5, Bulls 3, Cats 1.



Brendan Venter
(Former Springbok centre and London Irish coach)

  • Daan Human (Stormers)
  • John Smit (Sharks)
  • Eddie Andrews (Stormers)
  • AJ Venter (Sharks)
  • Selborne Boome (Stormers)
  • Luke Watson (Sharks)
  • Schalk Burger (Stormers)
  • Anton Leonard (Bulls)
  • Craig Davidson (Sharks)
  • Butch James (Sharks)
  • Ashwin Willemse (Cats)
  • De Wet Barry (Stormers)
  • Marius Joubert (Stormers)
  • Breyton Paulse (Stormers)
  • Gaffie du Toit (Stormers).

Breakdown:
Stormers 8, Sharks 5, Bulls 1, Cats 1.



Mike Greenaway
(Mercury rugby writer)

  • Daan Human (Stormers)
  • John Smit (Sharks)
  • BJ Botha (Sharks)
  • AJ Venter (Sharks)
  • Victor Matfield (Bulls)
  • Luke Watson (Sharks)
  • Jacques Cronjé (Bulls)
  • Anton Leonard (Bulls)
  • Craig Davidson (Sharks)
  • Butch James (Sharks)
  • Ashwin Willemse (Cats)
  • De Wet Barry (Stormers)
  • Marius Joubert (Stormers)
  • Breyton Paulse (Stormers)
  • Werner Greeff (Stormers)

Breakdown:
Sharks 6, Stormers 5, Bulls 3, Cats 1.

(This article was originally published on page 17 of The Cape Times on March 31, 2004)

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The Competition

The winner of the March Competition

We certainly had some people ripping the bottom out of our invitation that you can enter as many times as you like.
A couple of people must have programmed their systems in such a way that they kept on sending in entries all day and all night.

The idea of the competition is that it is a fun thing and everybody should have a fair chance to win. In the end it is the computer that chooses the winner.

So, let’s keep it a fun thing and not misuse it.

The winner of the March competition is Charles Cook from Kelvin in Sandton, Johannesburg. It is not often that we have a South African winner and we look forward to hearing from Charles what his friends have to say about his newly acquired Braai Utensil Kit.

Congratulations Charles, your Braai Utensil Kit is on its way to you!

Remember the following:

 

  • The monthly draw or competition is totally free to everyone.
  • You can enter as many times as you like.
  • You can only enter via the Competition link on our home page or by clicking here
  • All prizes are sent to the winner free of charge.

 

The prize for the April Competition

The winner for the competition for April will receive one of our Manual Semi-Industrial Biltong Cutters (See the picture on the competition page).
This cutter makes it very easy to slice or shred your biltong.

To enter the competition all you have to do is to visit our home page at www.biltongmakers.com and click on one of the two competition links.

The winner of all competitions is notified by email.

Some of the other prizes for the year

 

  • Biltongmakers
  • Biltong spices
  • Boerewors spices
  • Braai tool sets
  • Potjie Pots
  • Barbecues
  • Cadac Skottel Braais and………. much, much more!!!

 

So, don’t wait!

You can enter right now by clicking on the competition link on our home page.

 

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A free Biltong Maker!

It’s easy to earn a free Biltong Maker!

As a South African orientated web site we are constantly looking to contact more and more South Africans across the world.
Not only to tell them about how they can make their own Biltong but also to give them a chance to share their stories with other South Africans the world over.

So, here is your chance to help us.

If you know about a South African family or friend living near you or perhaps somewhere far away, why not tell them about us and then us about them.
Perhaps you can send us their email address so that we can mail them a copy of the newsletter.
If they like it they can stay on the mailing list, if not they can just let us know and we will remove them.

If the response we receive is large enough and directly due to your efforts you could be rewarded by receiving one of our products totally free of charge.

What an easy way to perhaps get your own Home Biltong Maker without having to pay a cent for it!

You can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com

(We received a lot of referrals during February and March and would like to thank all those who went to the trouble – Ed)

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Budget account

If you are really aching for a nice piece of Billies and the funds are a bit tight don’t despair!

We realize that with a very strong South African currency at the moment the prices have gone through the roof.

So we made a plan!

With our secure on-line payment facility through WorldPay (Bank of Scotland) you can also order your very own Home Biltong maker on your budget account.

You can then pay over 12 or 24 months as you wish.

With a bit of entrepreneurship you could start making Biltong and sell it to meet the monthly re-payments!
So, if you hesitated in the past you can now go to www.biltongmakers.com and follow the shopping mall link. It’s as easy as that!

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Let’s hear from you!

If you have something interesting to tell, a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask, it would be nice to hear from you!

Perhaps you have some advice to give?

You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Of course it does not have to be about Biltong or food. Anything that is of interest is welcome! Share it with other people around the world!

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Boerewors in the Benelux

The time has come and this month we will be making our first batches of Boerewors.

Click to me me biggerSince our little reminder during March we have already received many advance orders especially for the 10th year anniversay of the Freedom Day Celebrations at the end of the month. It might be an idea to have a look at what you are planning and let us know well in advance what quantities you will need.

Better safe than sorry!!

We have decided to try to keep the price at € 7.50 per kilogram for as long as possible this year. No promises though, we never know what the abattoir will charge next!
It might be interesting to keep in mind that we also do Boerewors rolls, Potjiekos for up to 100 people and Lamb-on-the-Spit for functions. So if you are planning anything please let us know?
More about that soon.

Interested parties can mail us at info@biltongmakers.com for details or phone us at +32 (16) 53.96.25.

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Potjie Pots in the Benelux

Click to me me biggerWe have a couple of size 3 and 4 Potjie Pots as well as some Gas Burners in stock in Belgium.

The burners are ideal for these size Potjies and will save a lot of hassle as far as the making of a fire is concerned.

The real and only way to create some “ambiance” is of course to have a real fire but for those people who are in a hurry this is ideal!

For those who are interested please call us at +32 (16) 53.96.25

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Previous issues of this Newsletter


You can click on the links below to view some of the previous issues of our newsletter.

September 2003
October 2003
November 2003
December 2003
Jan/Feb 2004
March 2004


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