April 2011

 

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The Biltongmakers.Com Newsletter
April 2011
You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
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In this Newsletter

 

 

From the editor

DISCLAIMER

The information and contributions contained in this newsletter are received from various readers local and international. Views and opinions reflected in our newsletter are not necessarily those of Biltongmakers.Com and its team members.



Keerbergen
April 2011It was still dark outside as I was driving along Vijfstraten on my way to the abattoir.

Vijfstraten is a small one-lane road meandering through the leafy little village of Keerbergen where we live.

It was still early in the morning and my red bull had not yet had the desired effect.
I was not paying particular attention to anything. After all, I had been driving this same road for the past 9 years and apart from squirrels and an occasional cat there was nothing really to watch out for.

But, driving along I felt something was not right, something had changed somewhere.

I stopped, reversed, looked ….

And there it was! A brand-new traffic sign that had not been there yesterday?

I sat there looking at it and could not quite make out what it was that I had to heed or watch out for but then I looked closely at the picture on the sign and it dawned!

Frogs! I had to watch out for frogs crossing the road!!

Frogs?

So, no sooner back home and onto old faithful and onto Wikipedia.
Not much to read there really apart from the fact that it’s Frog Breeding season and at that time of year Frogs think more about sex than cars.

Mmmm .. that makes a lot of sense.

It’s more about having some fun really, I think. To be quite honest, if there were so many frogs crossing I should have seen at least one cropped body (or a live one) the past month or so.

But no. Not even one!

Ah well, this is Belgium and this is the country where we stop for ducks and squirrels and doves and chickens and so on and so on. It’s all very nice I think.

You can sometimes sit in a queue on the road simply because some car, way up front, in front is waiting for a couple of Donalds and Minnies to get to the other side.
And can they dawdle! (the ducks that is 😉

As you probably gathered, it’s spring in our part of the world (hence the frog warnings) and you can just feel and see the whole world coming back to life.
The trees and the bushes are full of blossoms.

The gardens are full of crocuses, hyacinths, tulips and bluebells and too many other spring flowers to even mention.

Everywhere it is just one kaleidoscope of colours.
Everything is kind of breathing a loooong sigh of relief

Winter is over (again)!
It’s good to have some warmth back in our bodies after yet another lengthy winter.

Lucky for us we had a whole month break in December when we went to South Africa …..


December was the first time we went back in 9 years.

The first week we were in Jo’burg meeting up with old friends and I spent some time meeting with some our suppliers and customers.
It was great to meet so many of the people I have been dealing with for such a long time and never really met.
Fernando, Malcolm, Liekie, Sandra and Charlie at Crown National, Shane at JJ Airfreight, Anna at Apak, Joe and Roland at Heneways and Avi and his staff at the factory.

Being in Jo’burg it was like we had never left.
I brought Susie (my GPS) along but did not really need her.
Of course there were changes in the road systems and a lot of new buildings had gone up but for the rest?

Everything was just the same!

Especially the braais!
My goodness no-one in this whole world can put together a braai like a South African!
And it simply did not stop for the whole month!

We soon winged our way down to Cape Town and, via the Klipdrift distillery at Robertson (of course), drove down to Knysna to spend the rest of our holidays there with our eldest son Derek and his family at their magnificent place right on top of the “Heads” on the Pezula Golf estate.
On the right is a picture taken from the 14th hole. Click to see it big. Isn’t South Africa’s coast just incredible!
In fact the whole family was together. Even Tony, my son who lives in Holland, came over with his whole family. An incredible effort and surprise!
Gwendy my daughter, now living in Cape Town, drove down in her magnificent 1960’s restored VW Beetle! (What next will she get up to?)
It was great to have everyone together for the first time in many years.

I am not going to bore you with my thoughts about the country. Whether it has changed or not changed or waffle on about the security situation etc. etc.
I have my thoughts and will keep them to myself for while. But, it is still one of the most beautiful countries in the world and it is blooming cheap to live there!

I could not believe the prices in the restaurants and supermarkets. Even the house rents and prices.
But, especially the restaurants! And we went to many.
Where in this world can you get a full-on breakfast with eggs, bacon, sausages, tomatoes and chips etc. for just €4.00?
Or a full-on seafood platter with 12 prawns, chips and all the sauces for just € 8.00?
And that was not just at Derek’s restaurant but all over!
Come on!! Fish and chips (and a HUGE piece of Kingklip) for € 1.50! (No, this is not a typo!)

If you’re ever in Knysna please visit the Swing Café, Derek’s restaurant/nightclub. Good vibes, good food and good music!


Well, it has been a long time!

A lot of water has gone under the bridge and life has changed for many of us.
Hopefully for the better.

Why the long absence?

Well, I am not going to make any excuses. Priorities changed and something had to give.
In this case our newsletter.

I must be quite honest in saying that I missed putting it together every month; it was always such a lot of fun.
And then of course the feedback we received, the contacts we had with South Africans all over the world and the interaction we saw between expats everywhere. We were really global!

Somehow I feel that Biltong is a kind of universal “language/link (whatever you want to call it)” that binds most South Africans together.
They may be anywhere in the world and not even knowing each other, but …. just mention “Biltong” and all walls seems to disappear and people are instant friends.

This is the one reason I have done this newsletter.

The other reason is that I just had to listen to the many, many people who are still writing to us asking for a new newsletter. We even get calls at all odd hours (perhaps they’re forgetting the time zones ;-))

People send us their email addresses just wanting to make sure that we have the correct one because they are worried that they had not received a newsletter for a while.
When in South Africa in December so many people asked; “When is there going to be another one?”

Well, here it is.

I hope that you get as much fun out of it as you did all those years ago and as I have had doing it.
It took a while because I did not realize how “rusty” I had become!

I would love to do another one after this. It’s been so much fun. But, I would need some help and input.
That is, after all, what this is all about. The interaction between the so many South Africans who live away from their home land.

So, if you have enjoyed this one why not put pen to paper or fingers to the keyboard and let’s hear from you!

Hopefully till a next time!

Take care,



Mmmmm ….

A woman is sitting at home on the patio with her husband drinking a glass of wine and she says: “I love you”.
He asks: “Is that you or the wine talking?”
She replies: “It’s me …….. talking to my wine”.

 


Points to ponder …

Remember……………..?
(We’ve all seen it before but it is still nice to remember …-Ed)

Remember…….
Before the Internet or the AppleMac… Before semi-automatics and crack cocaine… Before SEGA or Cartoon Network… Before Playstation and MTV…

Way, way back……….

 

  • I’m talking about the time of Hide and Seek in the park…..or the dark.
  • The cafe down the road?
  • Hopscotch, Donkey, skipping and hand stands, backyard cricket with a tomato box, Dandy & Beano annuals
  • French skipping, charms and “arlies”, jumping the river, living on the beach, building a swing from a piece of rope tied to a tree, tennis on the street or swing ball in the backyard.
  • The smell of suntan lotion, hot tar and Oros.
  • Wicks bubble gum for a cent.
  • An ice cream cone from the kombi that plays a tune. Wait, can you still remember…
  • When around the corner seemed far away and going into town seemed like going somewhere, and your Ma made you “dress up” for the trip.
  • A million mozzie bites and peeling skin in summer.
  • Sticky fingers and sand in and on everything.
  • Cops and Robbers, Rounders, Stingers, Foefie slides and climbing trees.
  • Walking or riding your bike to school – no matter what the weather.
  • Running till you were out of breath.
  • Laughing so hard that your stomach hurt
  • Jumping on the bed….. Pillow fights. Spinning around, getting dizzy and falling down. Being tired from playing….. Remember that?
  • The worst embarrassment was being picked last for a team.
  • Paper water bombs and clay “lats” were the ultimate weapon.
  • A piece of card in the spokes held by a clothes peg transformed any bicycle into a motorcycle.

I’m not finished just yet!

Can you still taste and smell……….

  • Eating jelly powder from the box, ice lollies made from cold drink in Tupperware holders in the freezer.
  • Making sherbet from sugar and ENOS and boiling tins of condensed milk to make caramel – took hours!
  • Marshmallow fish and mice.

Remember when…………

    • There were two types of takkies – Tommies and the canvas ones, and the only time you wore them at school was for “PT”.
    • It wasn’t odd to have two or three “best” friends.

  • Nobody owned a pedigree dog.
  • 25 cents was decent pocket money.
  • When you’d reach into a muddy gutter for 5 cents and feel lucky.
  • When nearly everyone’s Mom was at home when the kids got there.
  • Remember when it was magic when dad would “remove” his thumb, or make 10 cents appear from behind your ear.
  • When it was considered a great privilege and very unusual to be taken out to dinner at a real restaurant or in a proper hotel.
  • When on a rare occasion Dad stopped at a roadhouse or “Dairy Den”.
  • Remember when any parent could discipline any kid, or feed him or use him to carry groceries and nobody, not even the kid, thought a thing of it.
  • When being sent to the headmaster’s office was nothing compared to the fate that awaited a misbehaving student at home. Basically, we were in fear for our lives but it wasn’t because of muggings, drugs, gangs, etc. Our parents and grandparents were a much bigger threat…… and some of us are still afraid of them!!!

Remember when…………

  • Decisions were made by going “eeny-meeny-miney-mo”.
  • Mistakes were corrected by simply exclaiming, “Nix!”
  • A “race issue” meant arguing about who ran the fastest.
  • Money was handled by whoever was the banker in “Monopoly”.
  • The worst thing you could catch from the opposite sex was germs.
  • Having a weapon in school meant being caught with a BIC pen, pea shooter or a “cattie”.
  • Taking drugs meant orange-flavoured chewable vitamin C or Milk of Magnesia.
  • Ice cream was considered a basic food group.
  • Skills and courage were discovered because of a “dare”.
  • Older Siblings were the worst tormentors, but also the fiercest protectors.

Didn’t that feel good…..just to go back and say, Yeah, I remember that!!!

If you can remember most or all of these, then you have LIVED!!!!

Pass this on to anyone who grew up in South Africa who may need a break from their “grown up” life!

Take care,

Story of the month

The Daffodil Principle
~~ Jaroldeen Asplund Edwards ~~

Several times my daughter had telephoned to say, “Mother, you must come see the daffodils before they are over.” I wanted to go, but it was a two-hour drive from Laguna to Lake Arrowhead. “I will come next Tuesday, “I promised, a little reluctantly, on her third call.

Next Tuesday dawned cold and rainy. Still, I had promised, and so I drove there. When I finally walked into Carolyn’s house and hugged and greeted my grandchildren, I said, “Forget the daffodils, Carolyn! The road is invisible in the clouds and fog, and there is nothing in the world except you and these children that I want to see bad enough to drive another inch!”

Stunning sight!My daughter smiled calmly and said, “We drive in this all the time, Mother.”Well, you won’t get me back on the road until it clears, and then I’m heading for home!” I assured her.

“I was hoping you’d take me over to the garage to pick up my car.” “How far will we have to drive?” “Just a few blocks,” Carolyn said. “I’ll drive. I’m used to this.”

After several minutes, I had to ask, “Where are we going? This isn’t the way to the garage!” “We’re going to my garage the long way,” Carolyn smiled, “by way of the daffodils.”

“Carolyn,” I said sternly, “please turn around.” “It’s all right, Mother, I promise. You will never forgive yourself if you miss this experience.”

After about twenty minutes, we turned onto a small gravel road and I saw a small church. On the far side of the church, I saw a hand-lettered sign that read, “Daffodil Garden.” We got out of the car and each took a child’s hand, and I followed Carolyn down the path. Then, we turned a corner of the path, and I looked up and gasped. Before me lay the most glorious sight.

It looked as though someone had taken a great vat of gold and poured it down over the mountain peak and slopes. The flowers were planted in majestic, swirling patterns — great ribbons and swaths of deep orange, white, lemon yellow, salmon pink, saffron, and butter yellow. Each different colored variety was planted as a group so that it swirled and flowed like its own river with its own unique hue.

There were five acres of flowers. “But who has done this?” I asked Carolyn. “It’s just one woman,” Carolyn answered. “She lives on the property. That’s her home.” Carolyn pointed to a well-kept A-frame house that looked small and modest in the midst of all that glory.

We walked up to the house. On the patio, we saw a poster:

 

 

“Answers to the Questions I Know You Are Asking”
50,000 bulbs.
One at a time, by one woman.
Two hands, two feet, and very little brain.
Began in 1958.

There it was….”The Daffodil Principle.” For me, that moment was a life-changing experience.

I thought of this woman whom I had never met, who, more than forty years before, had begun — one bulb at a time — to bring her vision of beauty and joy to an obscure mountain top. Still, just planting one bulb at a time, year after year, had changed the world. This unknown woman had forever changed the world in which she lived. She had created something of ineffable (indescribable) magnificence, beauty, and inspiration.

The principle her daffodil garden taught is one of the greatest principles of celebration. That is, learning to move toward our goals and desires one step at a time — often just one baby-step at a time –and learning to love the doing, learning to use the accumulation of time.

When we multiply tiny pieces of time with small increments of daily effort, we too will find we can accomplish magnificent things. We can change the world!

“It makes me sad in a way,” I admitted to Carolyn. “What might I have accomplished if I had thought of a wonderful goal thirty-five or forty years ago and had worked away at it ‘one bulb at a time’ through all those years. Just think what I might have been able to achieve!

“My daughter summed up the message of the day in her usual direct way. “Start tomorrow,” she said. It’s so pointless to think of the lost hours of yesterdays. The way to make learning a lesson of celebration instead of a cause for regret is to only ask….

“How can I put this to use today?”

We convince ourselves that life will be better after we get married, have a baby, then another. Then we are frustrated that the kids aren’t old enough and we’ll be more content when they are. After that, we’re frustrated that we have teenagers to deal with. We will certainly be happy when they are out of that stage. We tell ourselves that our life will be complete when our spouse gets his or her act together, when we get a nicer car, when we are able to go on a nice vacation, or when we retire. The truth is there’s no better time to be happy than right now. If not now, when? Your life will always be filled with challenges. It’s best to admit this to yourself and decide to be happy anyway. Happiness is the way. So, treasure every moment that you have and treasure it more because you shared it with someone special, special enough to spend your time with… and remember that time waits for no one.

 

So, stop waiting…!!

Until your car or home is paid off
Until you get a new car or home
Until your kids leave the house
Until you go back to school
Until you finish school
Until you lose 10 kg
Until you gain 10 kg
Until you get married
Until you get a divorce
Until you have kids
Until you retire
Until summer
Until spring
Until winter
Until autumn
Until you die …

There is no better time than right now to be happy. Happiness is a journey, not a destination.

So work like you don’t need money, love like you’ve never been hurt, and dance like no one’s watching.

 

* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *


The South African Meat Industry Company,
Samic has very nice meat cutting charts.
Just click on the banner below for lots of interesting information.



I must compliment whoever does the SAMIC newsletter for their lovely sayings! Have look, they are amazing!

 

Our Home Biltong Makers


The Brand-New Biltong Buddy!!

This month sees the launch of our brand-new Biltong Buddy MK-VI!

I've been making biltong for you South Africans since 1995!We have put a lot of work in this and are very happy with the result.
The new Mark-VI Biltong Buddy Home Biltong maker operates with a heating element to aid the drying process of the meat.
It holds a maximum of 2kg of wet meat and is an ideal addition to your kitchen appliances for making your own “stukkie” biltong.

We have often wondered about the length and trouble they go through on those biltong making videos your get.
Making biltong the South African way (the way most butchers do it) is as easy as 1-2-3 …!!

Cut the meat in slabs resembling pieces of biltong, spice it, let stand overnight, hang and voila!! Superb biltong!

With the Rugby WorldCup on the horizon you’ll be the envy of your friends!

Do a deal with them … you supply the “stukkies” Biltong and they bring the beer!!!

Some of the advantages and features of the New Mark-VI Biltong Buddy:

    • No more searching for globes which are getting more an more difficult to get)
    • Full 110 and 220 volt versions. The 110 volt guys don’t have to run around looking for the right globe any longer!
    • An absolute even drying of the meat within a matter of 2-4 days (depending how dry or wet you like your billies).
    • Simple and easy design which means that very little can go wrong.
    • Spare elements are available from our on-line store.
    • A window in the front of the box so you can see what is happening without having to “peek” all the time. This means that you don’t have to lift the lid and slow down the drying process.

It's as easy as 1-2-3 to make your own Biltong!

  • The switch on the front panel of the box lights up to show that the unit is working.


Have a look at the pictures here and tell us what you don’t like about it! We think it’s magic!

The new Biltong Buddy Mark-VI is now available from our on-line store at www.biltongmakers.com

 


 

An interesting fact!

Did you know that there are customers all over the world who are still using the old Mk-II Biltong Buddy!

This is just one of many, many mails we receive every day from all over the world.

My little biltong maker has kept me sane and smiling ……

For years, my little biltong maker has kept me sane and smiling. Even my husband wonders how such a small thing can produce so much happiness. It works like a charm, is really easy to use, and makes the best biltong ever.

I first bought my baby Biltong Maker in late 2002 after six months of living in Amsterdam with no biltong. The cravings were just too much and I decided to make it a Christmas gift to myself. I actually found a supplier of biltong in The Netherlands where I could order online, but the complicated Dutch payment system was too much for a poor girl from Mafikeng.

So the hunt was on. Thanks to the Internet, I discovered The Biltong Maker.

It arrived a few weeks after Christmas, thanks to a short stop with Dutch customs. Luckily I had a wonderful butcher nearby who helped select and slice the meat, even though he shook his head in doubt when I described what I was doing. But he was very expensive, so I learned to buy the right cuts of meat in wholesale stores and markets.

Now I could make the best biltong, and cheaply too!

The guidance and recipes on the Biltong Maker site are amazing – you’re up and running in no time at all.

Erica Harper
Vienna, VA 22181
USA

 


 

The most popular Home Biltong Maker in the world!Rockey’s New Turbo Machine

And yes, Rockey’s new 5kg Turbo Home Biltong maker has been an incredible success. So much so that we cannot possibly keep up with the orders that come in at the moment. The order processing time is therefore around 7 working days at the moment.

One incredible thing about the Turbo Model is that you don’t have to use the light. We found this out by accident when a customer called and said that it works perfectly without the heat from the globe.

This proves once again that it is not so much the heat but airflow that is the main factor in drying meat.

Rockey’s New Age Home Biltong Maker

The RNA-5 (as we call it) is exactly the same as its brother the “Turbo” model except that it does not have a fan. It is perfect to dry up to 5kg of wet meat and makes incredible biltong but in larger quantities than the Buddy.

Special new features:

  • All our Home Biltong Makers are now fitted standard with a CE approved appliance power cable complete with a standard EU two-pin plug.
  • Grommets have been added to the cable entry point on the box.
  • A highly improved and stronger PST is now used for all boxes.


And so, once again, we have improved on previous models and have made it easier and quicker than ever before for you to make your Biltong.

You too could be making your own Biltong in a very short space of time.
Have a look at our Home Biltong Makers and see how easy it is!!

Details on ROCKEY’S 5kg Home Biltong Maker as well as the new Turbo Model can be found by clicking on this link.

Our 16th Birthday Specials!!


It’s our Birthday … again!

This month it is 16 years ago that we made our very first Home Biltong Maker.

As most of you will know by now we did not really invent the original 2kg Biltong Maker.
Kel had an old Cardboard Biltong Maker box and worked a new idea around that one.

Now, sixteen years later, thousands of people all over the world are making their own Biltong!

We could tell you some stories about some other products that we have shipped across the world but we will leave that for another newsletter!

So, it’s April and it’s our birthday and we thought we had to do something special for our customers.

Since no-one will send us a present (he-he) we will give you something to celebrate about.

Here we go:

From date of publication of this newsletter till the end of May this is what will happen!

Free to the first 50 customers only!!
(With an order for one of our three Home Biltong Makers)

      A choice of …..
  • A Wooden Biltong Cutter.
  • 1/2 kg of Safari Biltong Spice.
  • 1/2 kg of the following spices ….
  • Country Boerewors Spice
  • Ouma’s Boerewors Spice
  • Burgher Boerwors Spice


Special discounts for Special customers!!


Free with all Biltong Maker orders placed (from this newsletter publication date till the end of May)

  • 20 special Biltong storage bags
  • A packet of our famous Nice ‘n Spicy spices complete with recipe.

 

Tips of the month



Get rid of mosquitoes …!

Mosquito Spray? … Worth a try!!

I was at a garden party a while back, and the bugs were having a ball biting everyone.

A man at the party sprayed the lawn and patio floor with Listerine, and the little blighters disappeared. The next year I filled a 1/2 liter spray bottle and used it around my seat whenever I saw mosquitoes.
And voila! That worked like a dream.

It worked at a picnic where we sprayed the area around the food table, the children’s swing area, and the standing water nearby. During the summer, I don’t leave home without it. Pass it on.

One of our friend’s comments:
I tried this on my patio and around all of my doors. It works – in fact, it killed them instantly.
It will last a couple of days. Don’t spray directly on a wood door (like your front door), but spray around the frame. Spray around the window frames, and even inside the dog house.

Johan says:
“Die goedkoper weergawe is Plax.
Helfte goedkoper as Listerine en werk net so goed.
Gebruik dit al lank, want boer mos met hase en jy kan geen gif buite gebruik met hulle in die tuin nie.
Enige iets is beter as die ander goed wat so sleg ruik. Plax of Listerine ruik en smaak beter!!”

 



Some more useful tips …
(do you have any, please let us know?)

An idea for Potjiekos lovers

This comes from Barry in South Africa. Give it a try and let us know what you think about his idea ..

Hi Guys,

Here is something that your readers may find interesting.
I’m a great Potjiekos maker, and I go for ‘beesstert’ (oxtail) Potjie most of the time.

I had gotten myself a pipe and stand which stands at the bottom of the pot with your food around the pipe, and works similar to the old coffee peculator. But you must make sure that all the onion bits are all removed before you place the stand at the bottom and before you place your ‘sealed’ meat around the pipe.

The onion bits quickly clog up the pipe if they are left in there. The onions go in much later after you have placed your potatoes and carrots in. During this time, I also pour almost a liter Coke into the pot (size 3 pot) and this really tenderizes the ox tail and gives it a some what sweeter taste to it.
The idea of the peculator pipe is to get your gravy and spices in the bottom of the pot to the top and over your veggies.

My mouth is actually watering just talking about it.)

Contact me if you wish for more info.

Barry
barry@tcspta.com

 



Good vision in a Downpoor!

We are not sure why it is so effective but just try this method when it rains heavily.
This method was told to us by a police friend who had experienced and confirmed it.

It is very useful…even driving at night.

During a heavy downpour most motorists turn on the HIGH or FASTEST SPEED of the windshield wipers. Yet the visibility in front of the windshield is still bad……

In the event you face such a situation, just put on your SUN GLASSES (any model will do), and miracles! All of a sudden, your visibility in front of your windshield is perfectly clear, as if there is no rain.

Make sure you always have a pair of SUN GLASSES in your car. You are not only helping yourself to drive safely with good vision, but also might save your friend’s life by giving him this idea. Try it yourself and share it with your friends!!!!

Amazingly, you still see the drops on the windshield, but not the sheet of rain falling. You can see where the rain bounces off the road. It works to eliminate the “blindness” from passing cars. Or the “kickup” if you are following a car in the rain.

They ought to teach this little tip in driver’s training. It really does work. This is a good warning.

I wonder how many people know about this???

 



Boererate

  • Suurlemoen en koeksoda werk beter as Handy-Andy.
  • Asyn en koeksoda maak vir ‘n baie goeie disinfectant.
  • Asyn en warm water kan ontslae raak van ‘n mierplaag!
  • Citrus Soda en suurlemoen maak ‘n aangebrande pot sommer vinnig skoon!




Our spices are Kosher and Halaal!

It will certainly interest our Jewish readers that our biltong spices are certified as being kosher by the Beth Din of Johannesburg. Anyone interested can mail us for a copy of the certification. (new 2011 certification is now available)
Our Muslim readers can rest assured that all our spices are certified Halaal by the Muslim Judicial Council Halaal Trust. A copy of the certification is available on request.

 



South African Meat Cutting Charts


Below you will find three excellent meat cutting charts.

These are displayed with the compliments of SAMIC.
(The South African Meat Industry Company).
SAMIC has a very interesting web site as well as a weekly newsletter about anything to do with the
Meat Industry in South Africa.
Now, don’t think this is a totally boring web site (I thought so first) but it has some very interesting articles and statistics.


Beef Cutting Chart
Pork Cutting Chart
Lamb Cutting Chart

 

* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *

Welcome to Apartment Oberholzer in Vienna, Austria

Excellent value at an incredible price!Winter or summer, our charming Viennese building will make you feel right at home. As our guests’ well-being is a matter close to our hearts, the quiet residence offers every convenience from a microwave, dishwasher and washing machine to Satellite TV.
The Vienna city center is within 10 minutes walking distance. Public transport is right at the Guest house.
Our well-kept, 54 sq meter newly renovated non-smoking holiday flat is suitable for 1-4 people.
It is central, quiet, charming and very reasonably priced.

For further information please see our website www.netland.at/wien/oberholzer

Questions and Answers


As in every newsletter, here is our regular section with some of the many questions we receive from our readers all over the world.
If we have not given an answer and you can help these people could you please mail them?
(Please copy us in on your mails @
info@biltongmakers.com
so we can help other people who might have the same questions in the future)



First we have some questions that continuously crop up in our mail box. The answers are simple and will solve most problems instantly!

QUESTIONS ON SAUSAGE CASINGS

 

  • Where can I get casings for the boerewors I want to make?
  • Which casing should I use for a particular sausage such as for normal boerewors or droewors?
  • Can you please supply me with casings for my boerewors? You can’t get them here in our country.


THE ANSWER

Sausages are made in one form or another in almost every country in the world. It’s the way butchers use the bits and pieces that fall of the meat when trimming (off-cuts).

If your butcher or supermarket has sausages, the casings for these are available. The easiest way to find out where to get them is to ask your butcher!
In most cases he will even sell you some if he makes sausages himself.

As to what size to use? You know how thick boerewors and droëwors is. Just ask the butcher for the size you see in his display cabinet or get the phone number of the people who he buys them from.

We do not ship sausage casings. Not because they would not survive the trip. They certainly will. But simply because they are available right there where you are!

 


 

PLEASE GIVE ME A PRICE FOR A BILTONGMAKER AND THE SHIPPING

THE ANSWER

Instead of emailing us for a price just use the ‘PRICING AND SHIPPING’ link on our home page www.biltongmakers.com. It is much quicker and easier and you’ll even find a currency converter to see what it will cost you in your own money.

You will find this link on the left-hand side of our home page.
Follow the easy instructions you find there and you’ll find out the exact pricing for everything.

 



QUESTION

Gas bottle adapter?
I am trying to find an adapter for my wife’s Skottel Braai that we got when we went to SA to visit family.
I didn’t realize how difficult it would be to find an adapter to fit an American Gas Bottle!
Do you have one or know how I could obtain one?

Jason Stoner
USA
stoner_gumby@yahoo.com

 



QUESTION

My biltong is hard on the outside and still pink on the inside
I recently purchased some biltong in SA from a butcher and the outside was dark, soft and shiny and it was really nice, although there was no fat on the meat the paper it was wrapped in was a bit oily.
When I got home I tried making my own but the outside is always rock hard with the inside very soft, it tastes nice but it is just the texture that I cannot get right.
Your help would be appreciated
Thanks

Edgar Gregan
Limassol, Cyprus
edgar_gregan@yahoo.co.uk

 



QUESTION

Kalahari Boerewors Recipe
Does anyone have a receipe for Kalahari Boerewors please?
Many thanks in advance

Jan Adrian Venter
New Zealand
janventer@xtra.co.nz

 



QUESTION

What is the Dragon herb?
This one comes up regularly so here it is again. This time from Lee-Anne Marais from Cape Town.
In one of your recipes you say we must use “Dried Dragon” I have looked it up on the net and have learnt something new. I have never heard of it before and neither have a lot of our suppliers of food products!

ANSWER

The herb called DRAGON is Tarragon and available from all good food stores and super markets.
You can get it as a small plant (like parsley, mint etc) or in a dried form in a small bottle.

Here is an extract from what we found on the web.
“Tarragon was used by the ancient Greeks as a remedy for toothache.
Today we know that tarragon contains an anesthetic chemical, eugenol, which is the major constituent of anesthetic clove oil, making its use for temporary pain relief understandable.
During medieval times there was a belief, called the Doctrine of Signatures, which stated that a herb’s appearance revealed its medicinal value. According to this philosophy, tarragon was thought to cure snake bites, due to the serpentine shape of its roots.
Even tarragon’s species name, dracunculus, comes from the Latin for dragon, again referring to the shape of its root, and adding to the myth of curing bites from venomous beasts and mad dogs.”
http://www.foodreference.com/html/a603-tarragon-dragon.html

 



QUESTION

How do I cook boerewors?
I live in Israel and just purchased 2 kg boerewors from a South African gentleman who was a butcher there.
I have read your article about how to cook them. As an inexperienced boerewors cooker I have a question.
Do you leave the entire link whole and grill it till done and then and only then slice up the sausage into portions? Or is it possible to cut up rather long sections to make grilling easier?
I hope that this does not seem like an absurd question to an experienced person like yourself.
(No question is absurd David and I bet that many people have asked themselves the same questions or simply end up with something they don’t like. -ED)
Thank you,

David Fishbein
Israel
nukepa@gmail.com

OUR COMMENT TO THIS QUESTION

Dear David,

Thank you for your email.
No questions is absurd. It actually makes good sense.
The traditional way is to grill the rolls and then cut it into pieces after it has been cooked.
The reason behind this is that the meat then cooks in its natural juices and the fat that is in the sausage. That way it will retain the juiciness and softness it is supposed to.
If you cut it up beforehand the juices will just run out and the fat will set the fire alight!
It’s always handy to have a jug of water next to the fire to sprinkle on the flames when these flare up.
Alternatively you can shape the longer pieces into smaller sausages (just turn them into smaller sausages). That way the juices will also remain. Watch out!! Don’t ever prick the sausage with a fork or damage the casing because, once again, the juices will disappear and your sausage will certainly be not as nice as it could be.

THE BILTONG TEAM

 



FEEDBACK

In reply to the many questions we get regarding a sausage maker the following feedback.

Kenwood (as in Kenwood mixer) produces a sausage attachment for their Kenwood Chef kitchen appliance. I believe they also make a mincer on its own with sausage spout.
When I got to New Zealand I bought a Kenwood Chef so it gets used for all the normal things and I get the benefit of using it to make sausages and they are awesome.

Cheers
Paul and Glenda Bing
Ohakune, New Zealand

 

Stoeptalk





Taxiing to a dead stop!
By James Clarke
Our stoepTOGETHERNESS Amadeus Tshabalala jinks his Toyota mini-bus taxi (with BMW hubcaps) through the rush-hour traffic.

He is a confident man of high spirits, as evidenced by the stickers on his rear window: “God loves Taxi Drivers” and “Defeat Constipation – Travel by Taxi”.

On the front of his taxi, above a dent which, ominously, is in the shape of a large traffic cop with his arms akimbo, is a placard reading: Northern Suburbs Express – Inaugural Flight.

Using the word “flight” is Togetherness’ little joke. He could well have used the word “fright” for such is his sense of humour.

We are witnessing (dear reader) the inaugural journey of a township taxi which hopes to establish a daily service between the quiet, leafy, mainly white northern suburb of Jukskei Park and Johannesburg city centre. It is a 25km journey that takes Togetherness 8.5 minutes if it’s not too busy and assuming he can occasionally drive on the pavements to avoid queuing in traffic.

The percussion waves from Togetherness’ powerful radio cause the vehicle’s sides to rhythmically flex. He hoots as he drives. Togetherness hoots at anything he sees – including trees and pretty girls – as is the custom of township taxi drivers.

Aboard the taxi are a dozen white people. They do not come whiter. Their whiteness is not due to fear; it is due to stark terror. Take John Hilton. Never in his life has he experienced zero to 100 km/h in six seconds – not in heavy traffic.

Denise Smith’s colour had changed to green-white as quickly as the last traffic light changed to red – a colour which, as is traditional among taxi drivers, Togetherness ignores. He looks over his shoulder – for a full minute – asking passengers their destinations. Elsbeth Brown, sitting right at the back, says. “Randburg centre!” She really wants to go all the way to Johannesburg centre but, suddenly, Randburg seems preferable.

She worries about how she will make her way from the backseat, but only fleetingly because the taxi has now reached Randburg and has stopped as suddenly as a plane might stop up against a mountain.

Now everybody is in front in a warm, intimate heap.

Elsbeth alights as gracefully as anybody can with one knee locked behind the other. She is vaguely aware of passers-by loosening her clothing and shouting: “Give her air!”

Togetherness bowls happily along Jan Smuts Avenue overtaking a police car that is chasing a getaway car. Then he overtakes the getaway car, exchanging boisterous greetings with the driver whom he appears to know. Togetherness is steering with his elbows because he needs his hands free to check the morning’s takings and to wave to girls.

He announces: “Ladies and gentlemen, this is your captain. We will shortly be landing in Johannesburg. Please make sure your seatbelts are fastened and your seats are in the upright position. Thank you.”

Piet Smit is chewing on a seatbelt that is made of leather. Togetherness had them specially made because he felt first-time passengers would need to bite on something.

Togetherness now merges with the mainstream of in-bound traffic. He merges with it in much the same way his Zulu ancestors merged with the British at the battle of Isandlwana.

He stops at his usual disembarkation point in the middle of a busy intersection and picks his teeth, patiently, while people sort out their legs and teeth before groping their way towards a street pole around which they can throw their arms.

By the time his passengers’ eyeballs have settled back in their sockets, Togetherness is halfway back to the northern suburbs.

Recipe Corner

Pork Belly Roast

A Pork belly roast is such a fun and easy thing to do and it takes no time at all.
Pork is also a very inexpensive meat and a nicely roasted large Pork belly on a dinner table looks stunning and never fails to impress guests.

Your shopping list

  • 1-2kg Pork belly (medium fat) complete with skin and somewhere between 5 and 10cm thick
  • Olive oil
  • Salt
  • Black pepper corns
  • 5 Chinese spice mix or
  • Barbecue spice or
  • A herb mixture such as an mix of origanum, thyme and rosemary

What to do

  • Put the meat side up and rub with whatever spice or herbs you have handy.
  • We often grind together some Chinese 5 spice and black pepper corns
  • You can also use a herb mix of origanum, thyme and rosemary plus salt and pepper
  • If you have nothing else simply use some barbecue spice
  • Whatever you use, spice the meat side well
  • Now turn the belly skin side up

Roasted Pork Belly is a fun and very inexpensive way to entertain your guests

  • Score the skin of the belly long-ways with a sharp knife (or make diamonds like we do sometimes).
  • Make sure that you don’t cut all the way into the meat
  • Rub the whole skin side with some olive oil.
  • Take some coarse salt and black pepper and rub well into the cuts and all the skin.
  • Put in a container, cover with tin-foil or Gladwrap and keep in the fridge (preferably overnight)

The next day

  • Heat the oven to 200C
  • Take an oven tray and fill with about 1-2cm of water
  • Put the meat skin-side up on a rack in the tray.
  • Cook for 1.5 to 2 hours
  • When the meat is done put the grill on full blast and really crisp up the skin to “bubbly” crackling. (Watch your teeth!)

Enjoy and don’t tell your doctor about it ;-))

 



Super-hot gepekelde eiers !

Kan jy sê super-hot-gepekelde-eiers … ?

Nie met een van hierdie in jou mond nie!
Dit is Majorly warm en maak seker dat jy dit kan hanteer voor jy dit probeer!

Bestanddele

  • 3 dosyn hardgekookte eiers (Geskil)
  • 1 quart gedistilleerde wit asyn
  • 1 ui (Gesny)
  • 1 eetlepel mosterd saad
  • 1 eetlepel dille nageslag
  • 1 eetlepel gebreekte rooi peper flakes
  • 1 eetlepel swart peper of peperkorrel
  • 6 naeltjies vars knoffel
  • 1 (16 gram) jar jalapeno peppers, met sap
  • 1 (16 gram) jar habanero peppers, Met sap
  • 10 koppeltekens Tabasco sous

So maak mens ..

Hard kook die eiers en steek ‘n paar keer duidelik deur die wit aan die dooier
Dan volg die onderstaande resep

  • Plaas al die bestanddele, behalwe die hardgekookte eiers, in ‘n bedekte pot en kook vir 15 minute
  • Plaas die hardgekookte eiers in ‘n glas pot en bedek hulle met die warm beit mengsel totdat die eiers heeltemal bedek is
  • As daar nie genoeg asyn is nie, kan jy ‘n paar eetlepels warm water voeg by die asyn oplossing
  • Marineer die eiers in die oplossing in die yskas vir 7 dae voordat dit bedien word
  • Hoe langer hulle marineer, hoe meer robuuste die smaak!

geniet dit!

(Die gepekelde eiers sal vir ewig hou as niemand hulle eet nie ;-))

 



Click below for our handy cooking converter
Our handy cooking converter
Bits and pieces from South Africa


Letter from Cape Town

Hello everyone, No, I am still here. However I am retired now. I went off on early retirement in May 2008 (at 59) due to medical reasons ie: acute heart problems, constant heart-fibrillation, diabetes, thrombosis, depression etc, etc. Guess my days are numbered.

I keep busy doing the things I never got round to doing, I vacuum the house, (a domestic engineer now), prepare food for my wife who still works and I do handy-man things around the house. I would like to think that I also protect my house by being here, but these days, they even break-in and rob you whilst you are at home.

My strong points are language; English/Afrikaans and I would like to do translations for an income as one of my family members does, but he lives in Germany. He speaks of a Euro per word for translation work. My German is not nearly good enough for German translation work. However, as an unknown, it is difficult to get a break.

Depending on which side of the fence you stand on, the general feeling here in S.A. is either that of euphoria or of utter despondency. The euphoria referring to those who commit fraud and corruption here on a daily basis and manage to get away with it. The government have just announced that they are thinking of abolishing TV licenses, but in its place, they want to add a 1% or 2% surcharge to every taxpayer, which really means that 7-million people will pay and the remaining 38-million will not. There is also a National “free” Medical Aid on the cards in the future which will also be added to our tax responsibility on an annual basis.

The free housing supply to all who are needy (3-million so far) is still on schedule according to the minister of housing Tokyo Sexwale, but they have lost billions to shady building contractors who build sub-standard HOP-houses and flee once they have been (handsomely) paid. Apparently, corruption does not differentiate on skin-color. However, he seems very keen to apprehend the perpetrators.

Add to that the constant black cars with black windows (sic) that scream through busy intersections with wailing sirens and with blue lights flashing, just before impacting with an innocent citizens car at a traffic light and the typical “Banana Republic” vision really starts to take place.

Some cabinet ministers are allowed to “buy” personal vehicles of up to R1.2 million while the people who voted for them, rummage through rubbish-bins to look for something to eat. The new President, Jay Zee, seems to have the right objective in mind in striving to provide decent service delivery, mostly from lackluster municipalities who do exactly as they please, but it is still early days. We’ll see! Clean water supply is a major developing problem and nothing is done by anyone to stop contamination and seepage from nefarious origins which in turn poisons the underground water table.

The share-prices on the JSE fluctuate daily due to the world crisis and a return on investment that was adequate some years ago is no longer sustainable. We all are making an extra hole in our belts, literally and figuratively. The constant dropping of the repo-rate by the reserve bank leads to a vicious circle as only the people who live beyond their means benefit from it. The rest of us who actually have savings, lose out as our income rate is cut accordingly. Its a case of heads you lose, tails you lose! Survival is paramount and I really feel sorry for the really poor.

The daily murder rate here will put the American/Afghanistan war deaths to shame yet no-one seems to really care for South Africans. No-one here has the guts to bring back the death penalty to serve as a deterrent to violent crime. Perhaps the U.N. will one day send-in a peace-keeping force to protect the innocent citizens here? However, so far they have done absolutely nothing to assist innocent citizens in Zimbabwe and the head clown still reigns there quite happily and he still commits his despicable atrocities daily. So I wont hold my breath!

However, as long as we still have Johnny Walker whiskey to block-out the daily shocking thoughts and visions, we can (must) hold on and survive. Second on my list is biltong and the occasional (expensive) braai, third. I cannot understand it, but I am developing a vegetarian approach to life lately with meat taking a lower priority. Yes I know, terrible outlook, but curiously true.

I am curious now as to who was looking for me with you. Was the enquiry from S.A.? Please see if you can remember.

In conclusion, a joke;

Koos and his wife were on holiday in Pattaya and they stayed at a beachfront hotel. As an early riser, Koos snuck out of the hotel at 6 in the morning and took a stroll, but a pretty street-whore saw him and offered her horizontal refreshment to him at $200.
He started to barter and offered her $20. She disdainfully turned around and walked away.
Later, after breakfast, Koos and his wife went shopping and he again bumped into the same pretty tart who started to laugh hysterically.
She pointed a long finger at his wife and said: “See what you get for $20 mister!”

All the very best to all of you.

Regards,

Ben Schulz

 


Commercial farmers leaving SA

The Times newspaper has reported that South African farmers are leaving the country in large numbers for a variety of reasons, including unbearable working conditions. Farmers are leaving the country because of poor working conditions for neighbouring states, such as Malawi, Democratic Republic of Congo and the Soviet State of Georgia among others.
There were 120,000 commercial farmers in South Africa in 1994 and only 37,000 remain, which has led to SA importing some of the food it used to produce, said AgriSA vice president Theo de Jager.

The country was now starting to import grains such as wheat. It was also on the brink of importing meat and poultry, which was being produced less and less in the country.

Farmers cited new laws, unionisation of farm workers, expensive water, electricity and other necessities, a shrinking supply of arable land, and the threat of land reform as reasons for farming in South Africa becoming unsustainable.

Many farmers believe that the latest threat, the New Security of Tenure Bill, will be the last straw driving farmers from the country, as it allows workers to plant crops, keep livestock and build houses on the farm on which they work.

Rural Development and Land Reform Minister Gugile Nkwinti’s spokesman Mthobeli Mxotwa said the New Security of Tenure Bill was meant to “stop cruelty against farm workers.”
“Workers get kicked off farms and dumped along the side of the road”. The Land Tenure Act and Extension of Security of Tenure Act were found [to be] toothless – evictions continued unabated.

“We decided to tighten the new bill in order to give farm workers rights. By the way, we also extended those rights to land owners.”

Sapa
04 April 2011

10 things I miss about South Africa


What do you miss most about South Africa?

We all miss things about South Africa.

It may be great to be an Expat and some of us live in some of the most idyllic parts of the world.

We have all the safety we longed for while still at home. Our children can play in the street without fear, we don’t have to call the security people when we want to go out at night … and yet ….
We all miss things about South Africa. All of us do!
So, here is a little place where you can tell us what it is that YOU miss about back home. Just the 10 most important mind.
We’ll publish them in our next newsletter and it will be fun to see how many of us miss the same things …

Here is a start:

The 10 things I miss most about South Africa

  • The sound and fury of a real Jo’burg thunderstorm.
  • The smell after the storm has abated.
  • A late lunch braai with your mates that ends at around midnight.
  • Having a greasy breakfast with the whole bunch the next morning ‘cos they never left.
  • Sitting out in my garden watching the foals frolic.
  • The taste of your first Castle on a Friday night.
  • Driving through the Magaliesberg or at “Harties” on a Sunday afternoon.
  • Weekends in the Waterberg where you can rediscover your soul amongst magnificent scenery and wildlife.
  • Driving all the way to Broederstroom to the “chicken pie farm, home of the chicken pie”, just for one.

And, and, and…

Around the World


Bits and Bobs from people around the world

Hallo there all expats and Saffies around the world!

This is how I make MY biltong!

Hope you guys are doing well, I really enjoy the news letter and hearing from expats all over the world making biltong. For about 25 years in South Africa, we hunted every year in June, bagged a Kudu and a couple of Impala and would cut everything up for biltong. We would then hang it up in the garage and dry it with fans

I moved to the USA 6 years ago and after initially struggling a bit, we found what we needed to make really nice biltong.

We normally buy 6 to 8 rump steaks, specially if Safeway (local supermarket) has a deal on the meat.
I cut them in strips, probably an inch thick. I then use Baleine course sea salt and red wine vinegar. I bought Crown National Biltong Seas Safari spices with us from SA (probably same as the spices you sell)

I then take a big enough container, sprinkle vinegar, salt and spices, and put one layer of cut meat, sprinkle all 3 again and then put a layer of meat and so on. This is then put in the fridge for 2 days, then hang it in the garage on wires and dry it with a good fan.
I think the secret is the meat laying in the mixture of salt, spices and vinegar.
Your biltong Buddy also works very well but I can just not make enough at a time!

Hopes this helps somebody, any expats in the US are most welcome to connect if they need help.

Take care and keep up the good work.
Cheers

Deon Pretorius
USA
deonpretorius@comcast.net

Something to smile about


Another couple “shorties” that keep flowing in daily

 

A little known fact …

The first testicular guard (“ball box”) was used in cricket in 1874

and the first helmet was used in 1974

It obviously took men 100 years to find out they also had brains ;-))

 


Indian Cab Driver

A drunk woman, stark naked, jumped into a taxi at a Durban Cab Rank.
The Indian driver opened his eyes wide and stared at the woman. He made no attempt to start the Cab.
“What’s wrong with you Love, haven’t you ever seen a naked woman before?”
“I’ll not be staring at you lady, I am telling you, that would not be proper, where I am coming from”. “Well if you’re not bloody staring at me Lovie, what are you doing then?”
“Well, I am looking and looking, and I am thinking to myself, where is this lady keeping the money to be paying me with.”

 


On the subject of Colonoscopies…

Colonoscopies are no joke, but these comments during the exam were quite humorous….. A physician claimed that the following are actual comments made by his patients (predominately male) while he was performing their colonoscopies:

 

    • Take it easy Doc. You’re boldly going where no man has gone before!


  • Find Amelia Earhart yet?
 
  • Can you hear me NOW?
 
  • Are we there yet? Are we there yet? Are we there yet?
 
  • You know, in Arkansas , we’re now legally married.
 
  • Any sign of the trapped miners, Chief?
 
  • You put your left hand in, you take your left hand out…
 
  • Hey! Now I know how a Muppet feels!
 
  • If your hand doesn’t fit, you must quit!
 
  • Hey Doc, let me know if you find my dignity.
 
  • You used to be an executive at Enron, didn’t you?’

And the best one of all…. Could you write a note for my wife saying that my head is not up there?

 


The power of advertising …

Two young boys walked into a pharmacy one day, picked out a box of tampons and proceeded to the checkout counter. The man at the counter asked the older boy, “Son, how old are you?”
“Eight,” the boy replied.
The man continued, “do you know what these are used for?”
The boy replied, “not exactly, but they aren’t for me.
They’re for him. He’s my brother. He’s four.

We saw on TV that if you use these you would be able to swim and ride a bike. Right now, he can’t do either.”

 



And last but not least …. Why we love children …

Nudity
I was driving with my three young children one warm summer evening when a woman in the convertible ahead of us stood up and waved. She was stark naked!
As I was reeling from the shock, I heard my 5-year-old shout from the back seat, ‘Mom, that lady isn’t wearing a seat belt!’

Opinions
On the first day of school, a first-grader handed his teacher a note from his mother.
The note read, ‘The opinions expressed by this child are not necessarily those of his parents.’

Ketchup
A woman was trying hard to get the ketchup out of the jar.
During her struggle the phone rang so she asked her 4-year-old daughter to answer the phone. ‘Mommy can’t come to the phone to talk to you right now. She’s hitting the bottle.’

More Nudity
A little boy got lost at the YMCA and found himself in the women’s locker room.
When he was spotted, the room burst into shrieks, with ladies grabbing towels and running for cover.
The little boy watched in amazement and then asked, ‘What’s the matter, haven’t you ever seen a little boy before?’

Police
While taking a routine vandalism report at an elementary school, I was interrupted by a little girl about 6 years old.
Looking up and down at my uniform, she asked, ‘Are you a cop? Yes,’ I answered and continued writing the report.
My mother said if I ever needed help I should ask the police. Is that right?’ ‘Yes, that’s right,’ I told her. ‘Well, then,’ she said as she extended her foot toward me, ‘would you please tie my shoe?’

Sport talk


Snippets from the papers

Where to now for the Proteas?
Graeme Smith’s era has come to an end, not on the high he would have hoped for, and not on the high he probably deserves.
Full Story

Lions to employ kicking coach
Lions coach John Mitchell has announced that they will be employing a kicking coach to help the struggling Super Rugby outfit.
Full Story

White up for Brumbies interview
World Cup-winning coach Jake White has applied and will be interviewed for the head coaching job at Australia’s ACT Brumbies.
Full Story

Plenty at stake at Augusta
Lee Westwood, Phil Mickelson, Luke Donald, Graeme McDowell and Tiger Woods have extra incentive to win the U.S. Masters this week.
Read Story

Sharks “desperate” to bounce back
The Sharks will be desperate to get back on the winning track when they host the Stormers after two consecutive defeats.
Read Story

 


 

Wie Ondersteun JY?!?

 

Blou Bul Rugby is soos ‘n Blou Movie …. Meestal voorspelbaar, maar steeds lekker om te kyk!
Sharks Rugby is soos Finding Nemo …. Jy cheer vir die klein blisempie eintlik omdat jy hom jammer kry
Stormers Rugby is soos Robben Eiland …. Jy lees nou en dan daarvan in geskiedenis boeke.
Lions Rugby is soos Brokeback Mountain …. Daar’s altyd ‘n klomp gewillige poepholle wat op die veld rondhardloop.
Cheetah Rugby is soos Eskom …. Jy weet daar’s krag, maar die ligte is af.


Our Birthday Competition!


Our Birthday Competition!

Competitions are always fun and I remember from the past (I go back to 2005 now!) that we used to have a new competition every month!
We had fabulous prices as well such as Biltong Makers, Potjiepots, Barbecue tool kits, MP3 Players (remember Isa in Israel?) and even a whole barbecue!!
The ultimate barbecue tool set

But we have had to move with the times and when things became busier in other areas we had to let something go.
First is was just the competition and then the newsletter.
That was a pity really because we always had lots of fun putting it all together!
But the requests to have another newsletter and another competition never stopped coming in.

I am very grateful that all the hard work we put into the newsletter since 2002 has had its rewards in the unbelievable feedback we always had and are still getting!!

Our 16th birthday seemed to be a good occasion as any to have another competition.
So for the many of you who have asked for this competition here it is!
It will be a once-off and will now run through to the end of August when the winner will be announced.

Just click here to go to the competition page or follow the competition link on our web site www.biltongmakers.com

The prize? ….

One of our very handy and smart looking barbecue tool sets (see picture). Just in time for those summer braais (in the northern parts of this world that is ;-))

Now, isn’t that smart!!

 


 

FACEBOOK Competition

The famous Rockey's new Age Home Biltong MakerFor those who are members of Facebook we have devised a competition as well.
All you have to do is go to The Biltongmakers.Com! Facebook page and simply click on the “like” button you will find on top.
That done your name will automatically go into the hat for the draw that will take place the moment we have reached our target of 500!
The winner will be announced in a future newsletter, by email and on the Facebook page!

The prize for this competion?

One of our Rocky’s all time favourite Home Biltong makers complete with instruction booklet, hooks, sample spices and dowels to hang the hooks on!

It is so easy to make your own Biltong with this incredible invention and it’s fun too. And the best part is that you can make your own Biltong just the way YOU like it and at a fraction of the cost!
Rocky’s New Age Home Biltong maker is used around the world from South Africa to England and from Russia to the “steppes” of Siberia and from Greenland to the sweltering climates of Florida, Australia, Singapore and Hongkong

Biltong is the universal language of all South Africans and we help them “talking” to each other wherever they may find themselves in this world!

So, to all of you who have been asking for this I can only say one thing … get going!!

 



This from a previous winner!

Dear BILTONG TEAM,

Wow…..I’m blown away. This is the first time I have ever won anything. I’m looking forward to receiving my MP3 Player.
Once again many thanks, for the great web site. I so enjoy the recipes given and all the information you provide us with.

Many thanks,
Isa Kahn
Israel
2005

 



Remember the following:

  • The competition is totally free to anyone.
  • You can enter as many times as you like.
  • You can only enter via the Competition link on our home page or by clicking here
  • Prizes are sent to the winner free of charge.

 

You can enter right now by clicking on the competition link on our home page.

Let’s hear from you too!!


Come on, let’s hear from you too!!

You are probably sitting at the computer right now so how about a small (or big) contribution? It does not have to be about Biltong or such. We’d love to hear where you live and how you have adapted yourself to your new life style and surroundings.
Let our readers enjoy your story!

You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask? Or perhaps you have read something of interest that you might want to share?
Perhaps you have some advice to give?

You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Share it with other people around the world!

Click right here to start now or you can mail us at the webmaster@biltongmakers.com

Boerewors for Europe and the UK


Boerewors (Europe and UK only, sorry people!)

Summer is well on its way and our boerewors has once again proven to be a hit with South Africans and local people alike for the 10th year in a row!
We are making fresh batches of around 150 kg every week at the moment and are hardly keeping up. Especially our neighbours in the south of Europe are shipping it by the “truck load”!

This is the first year we actually ran out twice!
But, ‘n boer maak ‘n plan’ so we have enough fresh stock available most of the time.
What is better than real South African boerewors on a braai?To place an order just click on the picture or go to our web site at www.boerewors.be and fill in the order form.
You can either collect or we can mail it to you.

All our customers in Holland, Belgium and in fact, all over Europe are raving about the packing of and the condition in which the wors arrived at their doorsteps.

Just imagine some “lekker” pap and wors with a nice tomato and onion sauce!
(See the recipe section in our previous newsletter!)

Complete the order form you will find by going to www.boerewors.be or give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25.

Our Boerewors is vacuum packed in quantities of about 500 gram.
Like with everything else the price has increased slightly because of the increase in the price of meat, spices and casings. Our spices from South Africa have gone up by no less than 43% and there is a big shortage of casings we are told because China is buying up whatever they can get hold of!

Our normal price at the moment is € 10.25 per kg but for the time being we will keep it at only € 8.45 per kg!!

You can also place your order by simply clicking here.
Droëwors around the world


Droëwors …… a typical South African delicacy all of its own!

Droëwors, as it is known in South Africa, is as much part of the country’s culinary culture as Biltong, Pap, Boerewors and Potjiekos.
100 grams of pure South AfricaThe spices are of course imported especially from South Africa so you will get the “real” thing!

Fresh droëwors is available right now and we normally have ample stock.

The price is € 40.00 € 29.00 per 1kg pack or € 4.50 € 4.00 per 100 gram packet (at 08-04-2011).

Droëwors (like biltong) travels well and posting is an ideal option.
We can mail it to you anywhere in the world via priority mail in minimum quantities of 500 gram.

You can place your order now by going to www.boerewors.be, give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.

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Biltong for all our readers!


Biltong …… once hooked you’re a slave forever!

Biltong is without doubt the snack most associated with South Africa!
It is so much part of South African culture that there is no food related shop that will not stock it. You find it literally anywhere.
Say Biltong and you say South Africa!

Biltongmakers.Com has for more than 16 years supplied their Home Biltong Makers to South African expats all over the world so they could make their own biltong away from home.

Freshly sliced biltong!We were often asked why we don’t make Biltong ourselves and then make it available to the poor and deprived South Africans living away from the Mother Country!
The requests were relentless and constant so almost 5 years ago we decided to give it a go and you can now get your biltong (and chilli bites) directly from us.
The spices are of course imported from South Africa so you will get the “real” taste like “back home”!

The price is € 50.00 39.00 per 1kg pack or € 5.50 4.95 per 75 gram packet.

Biltong travels well and posting is an ideal option.
We can mail it to you anywhere in the world via priority mail.

To place your order please go to www.biltongmakers.be and click on one of the order form links. You can also call us on +32 (16) 53.96.25

We will get right back to you with how much the postage will be.

 

(For countries outside the EU we must mention that we are not responsible for packets confiscated by customs.

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Pig or Lamb on the Spit


Pig or Lamb on the Spit ……. something special!

Well, last summer certainly saw some lambs and piglets on the spit! In October we did our last one for a while. We needed a rest!!

It is almost summer again and the right time to start thinking about a spit braai this Spring or Summer.
Like every year, we are already booked almost full for May and part of June .
Click to see me big!So, if you want to be part of the fun and really impress your friends, colleagues or other acquaintances, book now!

Lamb or pig on the Spit is a way of entertaining as only known by very few mainly because it is thought to be very expensive ……. Not so!
We will do a Spit Barbecue for parties of between 30 and 50 people from just € 22.50 per person.

Together with the meat we will treat you to a big pot of curried potatoes, a tomato/salsa salad as well as an incredible Tzatziki (cucumber, yoghurt and mint) salad. Garlic or bread rolls are included as well. And, don’t forget the mint sauce with the lamb and the apple sauce with the piggy!
For venues more than 50 km from our home base in Keerbergen there is a small transport fee.

Start planning now for those special occasions! Just keep in mind that quite a number of dates up to October are already booked!
Remember that we are doing these functions only during weekends.

 

Booking early is essential and you can do so on
+32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.

(A Lamb or pig on the Spit can only be done outside because we cook on coals!)

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Subscribing and Unsubscribing


Perhaps you would like to subscribe to this newsletter or tell a friend about Biltongmakers.Com! and the incredible Biltong Makers!! You can be included in this newsletter by clicking on the following link.
Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!
If you prefer not to receive email from us, you can unsubscribe from Biltongmakers.Com! by clicking on this link.
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October 2008

If images are not visible in this email, please visit the online version.

The home of Biltong, Boerewors, Potjiekos and much, much more!

The Biltongmakers.Com Newsletter October 2008

You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
If you do not wish to receive this newsletter you may unsubscribe at the bottom where you will find an automatic email link. Just click on that and send. Your name will then be permanently deleted from our database.

If you, your family or your friends want to subscribe to the newsletter please click on this link.

Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

In this Newsletter top
From the editor top


DISCLAIMER

The information and contributions contained in this newsletter are received from various readers local and international. Views and opinions reflected in our newsletter are not necessarily those of Biltongmakers.Com and its team members.

Keerbergen
Belgium

Oh, how nice it is to be young again. Even it is just for a day or so!

Walking up the road towards the castle is always something you dream about. You see pictures of it, and can imagine what it must be like, but to actually walk up to it was amazing.

Just to think that you could bump into Mickey or Donald or Goofy or Pluto made me feel like a little kid again. I couldn’t wait to see one of them and didn’t know where to look first.

We were in Disneyland, Paris.

Tony, Catherine, Jesse and Caitlyn invited us to come along and spend the weekend with them there.

Now, it has always been a secret desire of mine to one day meet up with Goofy.
As far as I can remember (and now I go back many moons) I always felt drawn to Goofy more so than to Donald and Minnie. You know how it is as a little boy or girl to fantasize and live yourself totally into the stories that you read or those that get read to you.

Even just looking at the pictures used to be a treat.
I don’t even know what the kids of today do but I guess it is not like in our days where you just had to have your Donald Duck comic book every week. We used to swop them with friends and guarded them like gold.
I guess today it is Spiderman and such or, perhaps the Playstations have taken over from the wonders of the fairytales and innocent comics.

What became immediately apparent as we walked around was the generation gap.
Where June and I were looking for Donald and Minnie and Goofy and Pluto, the kids were running around admiring exhibits such as “Pirates of the Caribbean” and going on real flight simulators (Jesse and Tony’s forte).

But when we watched the Grand Parade there were very few ohs’ and ahs’ when Pinocchio and Geppetto and Lucky Luke and Dumbo, the flying elephant came walking/dancing about.
The Lion King and Cinderella were among the better known ones by the kids.

The Castle is of course one of the main attractions. The centre piece of the whole place!

When I saw the Castle I could only but admire Walt Disney for his incredible insight in using Neuschwanstein, in the South of Germany (the castle he modeled his on), as a model for his Fairytale Castle. It really looks like it (click on the pic).
Neuschwanstein is the ultimate Fairytale Castle, although no royalty ever lived there. It is in southwest Bavaria, in Germany, somewhere near the Austrian border and it literally means “New Swan Rock” in German.
It was started by King Ludwig II and was still under construction when he drowned himself in a lake in 1886. Just weeks later, on August 1, 1886 the castle was opened to the public.

But, I digress.

They say that Disneyland is for anyone from 9 to 90 years and that is so true. It brought back many memories and even a tear to the eye to see everything that you, as a child, always admired and felt very close to, now in “real life”.

The floats, the dresses and the way they made people look like the real thing was absolutely amazing. There they were, walking and dancing right in front of you all along the roads and the squares. And then to think that Disneyland in Florida is five times as big and opulent.
We could not possibly see everything in Paris in the short time we were there so how long would one need in Florida?
But what we did manage to see was amazing.

The most special moments were when I saw the look on little Caitlyn’s face wherever we went but especially in the haunted house. Have a look at her here.
Doesn’t she look gorgeous?
That makes me want to be little again. Can’t someone please turn back the clock for me … pretty please?

If you ever have the chance to go to Disneyland, don’t even think twice but just go.

When we left June, Jesse and I went for a quick look at the Disney film studio section.
We did not have much time left because the park was closing for the evening.

And, lo and behold, there was Goofy in all his glory!

And he even put his arm around me and that made my day!

And so it is autumn again.

The whole world is changing and the days are getting shorter and shorter. It is beautiful outside with the sun shining on the ever changing colours of the leaves falling down from the trees.

The reds and the yellows, the browns and the purples.

Walking around in the forest it is as if you were treading on a delicately knotted Persian carpet. You are almost too scared to disturb the incredibly delicate pattern of colours.
It is like going outside after a heavy overnight snowfall. You just don’t want to disturb the absolute beauty of what lies in front of you.

Driving along the roads is breathtaking and you have to take care not to take your eyes of the road. I can’t help stopping every now and then and just take it all in. We rush around so much in our loives that most of the time we don’t even take the time to stand still for a moment and enjoy these little moments. Out in the front garden whole families of toadstools are jumping up overnight in the most amazing of colours. Out at the back the squirrels are gathering their nuts for the winter. We keep them well supplied.
I often say that the only thing we miss about South Africa is the weather.
But then, when I see the beauty of the different seasons all around me over here I am glad, and very happy that I am able to experience this, year in and year out.

Coming home and having a nice drink in front of a roaring open fire while watching nature playing its games outside will always be one of my favourite moments.

It has been quite a while since our last newsletter and there are no excuses apart from the fact that things have been hectic, to say the least.

Apart from running the web site and the on-line store for Biltongmakers.Com we have been very busy with the actual manufacture and sales of our boerewors, biltong and droëwors.

Strangely enough the South Africans in Belgium are by far the smallest part of our market. It is the South African clubs and expats in the rest of Europe and especially in Germany, France (the South!) and the UK where most of our products are going.
Italy, Portugal, Spain and Greece are also very popular destinations.

It is hard work though and I sometimes wish I had the staff I had back in South Africa to help with all the donkey work. But, we are here and one has to adapt.

We are now nearing the quieter time of the year for the fresh products so we can take a breather and concentrate a bit more on Biltongmakers and the newsletter perhaps!!

So, here we are with a brandnew newsletter. I must thank all of those who have contributed. It makes it so much easier and such a lot of fun to put it all together.

Until the next time,

Take care,

Lo

I don’t measure a man’s success by how high he climbs but how high he bounces when he hits bottom.”
– General George S. Patton –
“Take things as they come. If you get too far ahead of yourself, you’ll miss out on the little things that makes the best memories”
– Unknown –

Point to ponder … top

I really enjoyed reading this and I thought this may interest you for your next newsletter?
It’s a poem by Ian Macdonald. He makes some gome great points and made me remember why…
Regards
Carla McLachlan

Why do I love South Africa?

I love her for the perfection of her days
The crisp Karoo morning
The Jo’burg winter noon The late summer Cape Town sunset
The star-filled Free State night

I love her for her people
For our warm smiles
For our resilience
For our I-am-because-we-are

I love her because she delights my senses
Highveld thunderbolts
Jacarandas in bloom
Sunday braais
African sun

Icy sea

I love her raw power, her intensity, her strength

I love her because of how she makes me feel
Sometimes angry, sometimes joyous
Sometimes fearful, sometimes love-filled
Sometimes frustrated, sometimes hopeful
Always alive
I love her because she intrigues me
And challenges me
The Chinese have a curse: “May you live in interesting times”
I see it as a blessing

I love her because she helps me keep things in perspective
By reminding me how privileged I am Every day

I love her for being a microcosm of the world
A world in one country
For what we can teach the world
About compromise
And sharing
And forgiveness
And tolerance
And hope

I love her because she’s imperfect
And full of opportunity
And potential unfulfilled

I love her because she has come so far
And has so much further to go
And whether we ever get there
Will all depend on us

I love her because she’s been so good to me
And she inspires me to return the favour

I love her because she’s my country
No matter what
I love her because she’s my home
And where my soul is at rest

By Ian Macdonald

Story of the month top

Anchovies!
(From “travels with Delia”)

Delia went to the Basque country in Spain to see the finest anchovies harvested from the Cantabrian Sea
and devotedly prepared for the can.

Throughout history the skills of cooking, dedicated to exciting the palate rather than merely satisfying hunger, have depended on the availability and quality of certain ingredients. And some ingredients have been more highly prized than others for their ability to make other, blander foods more palatable.

This was never more true than with the anchovy, a tiny fish no more than 8 in (20 cm) long, which reacts to curing and preserving in a magical way that other fish do not. Once cured and preserved, it becomes a star ingredient, adding a unique zest and piquancy wherever it’s used.

From classical times, the anchovy has been used to enhance the aspirations of cuisines all round the world.
In Russia, it is eaten hot-smoked; in the Orient, dried, and in southeast Asia, it is pounded and made into a pungent fish sauce. In Britain, too, it has long been an ingredient no serious cook could be without.

In Elizabethan days, anyone who boasted a fine table had a barrel of salted anchovies in the larder.
And throughout the 18th and 19th centuries, it fuelled our national passion for bottled sauces with a succession of variations like:

  • Harveys (anchovies, pickled walnuts, soy, shallots and garlic)
  • Pontac ketchup (anchovies, elderberry juice, shallots and spices)and
  • Burgess’s Anchovy Essence, which dates back to 1760.

Gentleman’s Relish is still being spread on toast today, and our most famous bottled sauce launched in 1838, Worcestershire Sauce, has as its main ingredient, guess what……?

Originally anchovies were packed in salt but now, more conveniently for the cook, they come boned, cleaned and preserved in olive oil in the familiar little tins.

So I went there to see for myself ….

I’ve always had a passion for anchovies but confess to knowing very little about them until a few months ago when my curiosity took me to northern Spain, to a group of fishing villages an hour’s drive east of Bilbao, where the finest anchovies in the world are caught.

This is the Basque country – note, country, not region, for the Basques remain to this day very different from the rest of Spain. Historically, they are strong and courageous fighters, as they need to be here.
this area of Spain faces that part of the Bay of Biscay known as the Cantabrian Sea, a volatile and dangerous sea, which reacts violently to climatic changes. For centuries, they have waged a constant battle against the sea to protect their livelihood.

My visit coincided with the anniversary of one fateful night, 21 April 1878, when 16 villages lost 285 men and 37 vessels.

The mountain landscape, which is intensely lush and green, provides a backdrop to the rocky, rugged coastline and villages perched vertically around the natural harbours where the fishing fleets are moored.
I am immediately struck by how colourful everything is – the boats painted in vibrant hues, the people dressed equally brightly; in fact the only black you’ll probably see is the traditional beret worn by many of the men.
I am told that, characteristically, the Basques laugh, drink and eat, strictly in that order.

The anchovy season lasts just ten weeks, from around mid-April to the end of June, depending on the weather. This is the peak time for the best-quality anchovies. The fish is at its tenderest and plumpest in spring just before breeding, which happens as soon as the temperature of the water begins to rise.
During breeding, its flesh is watery and of poor quality. However, thanks to the unpredictability of the Cantabrian Sea, no exact dates can go in the diary.

When I arrive at Lekeitio, it turns out that, so far this year, nothing has happened, and there is a tense uncertainty on the faces gazing up at the grey skies. The sea does not look unduly rough but I may have to reconcile myself to not seeing even one freshly caught anchovy.
The gods, however, were on our side for, while we slept, the first Lekeitio boats took to sea with sonic detectors to track down the shoals of anchovies swimming near the surface.
In olden days, the fishermen would look out for the dolphins that would also be harvesting the anchovies – I always knew dolphins had good taste!

The next morning the sun even came out, and we all rushed down to the harbour to await the first arrival.
Over the radio we heard that the first boat had some 10 ton of anchovies on board, and on the quay it was like a kind of red alert – buzzing with people of all ages.
Everyone in the village is roped in during these intense two-and-a-half months.
At last the first boat, bright in the sun, noses its way along the harbour wall.

What follows is high drama.

Alfonso Yurrita and his nephew, George (who unknowingly have been supplying me with anchovies for years), explain the procedure. The first box of fresh fish is winched up by crane on to a waiting cart. Here I get my first glimpse of their elegance and beauty, the open box glistening with silvery iridescence.
Each anchovy has a back of midnight blue graduating down to a pale blue and silver belly that is mirror-like. The cart is then rushed into the auction room, where there is one solitary table, an ancient pair of scales and a one-kilo weight.

A kilo of fish is quickly weighed out and then counted, a simple but essential ritual that will determine the quality of the whole catch. Size (especially for preserving in oil) is paramount, and the price will be fixed by this; 35 to 37 anchovies per kilo is perfect and is what you and I will end up with in the tin.
Other sizes are fine for sauces and purées and the larger ones will be salted whole.

Up in the auction room, the whole catch is being sold by a form of Dutch auction, where the price starts high and is haggled down. Mr Yurrita’s buyer – all the buyers seem to be women – is called Elvira and she explains she has been doing this job for 37 years, and ‘has anchovies in her blood’.
I imagine the auction is just as it has been for centuries, with the exception of the mobile phones which keep buyers in touch with all the other catches now coming in along the coast.

Today the Yurritas are buying four ton, and now another race is on: the fish fresh from the sea have to reach the brine as quickly as possible as this is critical for quality.
The processing plant is just five minutes from the harbour; Alfonso explains all his plants are that near to the ports.

Things are hotting up along the coast and we next visit Ondorra. By 11am, the harbour is packed with boats – a blaze of colour – and tangled rigging. Here too, the carts are whizzing back and forth and the auction room is packed, but the mood is a little sombre – the first landings are on the small side but luckily this improves as more boxes arrive.

We lunch on the terrace of the Yurritas’ house, in a stunningly romantic location overlooking the harbour at Mutriku and high enough for a clear view over the Atlantic where the swell of the waves is totally mesmerising.
We eat anchovy tapas prepared by Amparo Yurrita: fillets curled round artichoke hearts; small crisp squares of toasted bread with chopped tomato, egg and anchovy; little boats made from crisp chicory leaves filled with a Roquefort and cream mixture and garnished with snipped anchovies; a purée of avocado combined with a thick, luscious anchovy paste.
An anchovy fillet wrapped around a pickled chilli was a sensation. Next, a huge tortilla, and I write copious notes on the Basque way to prepare it.

The Yurritas are patently in love with anchovies and proud of their quality. Recalling a huge poster I’d seen on the wall of the packing house, ‘Cero Defectos’ (no defects), I ask Alfonso what epitomizes this quality.
Each anchovy, he explains, should be firm, its colour a rich pinky-brown with a visible sheen. Each fillet should be fully cleaned and trimmed with no trace of skin or bone, and whole with no breaks in it. It should be a good consistency yet tender; poor quality anchovies are either soft and soggy, or raw and tough.

The next time I pull one of those rings and see the little fillets inside, I shall have much to think about – the silvery fish in all their glory, the colours, the people, their pride in their trade and, yes, the romance. All that in a 2 oz/50 gram tin!

A year in the life of an anchovy

The anchovies fresh from the sea, and still with their natural white flesh, are taken to the processing plant 100 meters from the harbour. Those that are not beheaded and gutted go straight into preserving salt to hold their freshness for a day or so.

Next, the whole anchovies are washed in a brine solution then packed into large containers, with about 5 mm of salt between each layer of fish.
A final layer of salt goes on top followed by a disc, which is weighted down by a large stone. This will keep the fish well pressed and eliminate air. As it shrinks, it is topped up with more fish and salt.

The curing takes 6-8 months at room temperature and, in the process, the salt draws out the excess oil from the fish. Storage from then on has to be in a refrigeration room to halt the maturing process – except for the smaller anchovies, which go on maturing until they eventually soften, liquify, and are shipped to Lea & Perrins and other manufacturers of Worcestershire Sauce.
For the fillets in oil, the next stage is de-salting. This involves removing the anchovies from the barrels and washing first in cold water then hot, and finally cold again. After this, the skins are rubbed off and the tail snipped with scissors. Now they go back into brine to re-absorb the salt lost in the curing, then packed into metal containers and machine dried.

Next, each one is filleted by hand using a small knife: the anchovy is opened along the back, and one fillet is removed, trimmed and cleaned by scraping lightly with a knife. The back bone on the other fillet is removed, then both fillets are pressed between absorbent paper to pack into the cans with olive oil.

After layering, the cans are topped up with oil, sealed then piled into containers for their journey all over the world.

Here is a little recipe that I found very tasty and, of course, so simple to make!
Give it a try sometime ….

Spaghetti and Anchovies
(Source: Mom)

  • Minced garlic
  • (olive) oil
  • 1 can anchovy fillets in oil
  • Cooked spaghetti, about 4 servings
  • Sautee the garlic briefly in a bit of oil.
  • Drain the anchovies and add to the skillet. Break them up as they cook, into a paste.
  • Add a little water if necessary. Remove from heat and toss with well-drained spaghetti. This will not be a wet sauce, but you can add a bit of water or oil.
  • Let sit a few minutes and serve with grated cheese (Pecorino Romano).

* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *


The South African Meat Industry Company,
Samic has very nice meat cutting charts.
Just click on the banner below for lots of interesting information.
I must compliment whoever does the SAMIC newsletter for their lovely sayings! Have look, they are amazing!

Our Home Biltong Makers top

Rockey’s new TURBO Home Biltong Maker!

Our new “Turbo” Home Biltong Maker is just incredible. We first bought the Biltong Buddy, years ago, then Rockey’s New Age box and now this …. MAGIC!!
There no words to describe how thankful we are that we found Biltongmakers.Com on the internet. So far away from home it has changed our lives and our biltong brings a little of South Africa back in our home.

Thank you so much for an incredible invention!!

Jan du Toit
Melbourne, Australia
28-09-2008

This is just one of many, many mails we receive every day from all over the world.

Rockey’s New Turbo Machine

And yes, Rockey’s new 5kg Turbo Home Biltong maker has been an incredible success. So much so that we cannot possibly keep up with the orders that come in at the moment. The order processing time is therefore around 7 working days at the moment.

One incredible thing about the Turbo Model is that you don’t have to use the light. We found this out by accident when a customer called and said that it works perfectly without the heat from the globe.

This proves once again that it is not so much the heat but airflow that is the main factor in drying meat.

The Biltong Buddy

Of course the old Stalwart of all Home Biltong Makers the world over is still the good old Biltong Buddy. The other day we received some pictures of a Buddy that was bought in September of 2001 by Toby and Leslie Battell who now live in the USA and it is still going strong!!

Have a look at the picture! Click on it and see it in all its glory!

Not bad for a 7 year old machine and certainly very well looked after. Of course this is an old model and the design has changed somewhat over the years. One of the main new features is the window in the front panel.

Rockey’s New Age Home Biltong Maker

The RNA-5 (as we call it) is exactly the same as its brother the “Turbo” model except that it does not have a fan. It is perfect to dry up to 5kg of wet meat and makes incredible biltong but in larger quantities than the Buddy.

Special new features:

  • All our Home Biltong Makers are now fitted standard with a standard appliance approved power cable complete with a standard EU two-pin plug.
  • Grommets have been added to the cable entry point on the box.
  • A highly improved and stronger PST is now used for all boxes.

And so, once again, we have improved on previous models and have made it easier and quicker than ever before for you to make your Biltong.

You too could be making your own Biltong in a very short space of time.
Have a look at our Home Biltong Makers and see how easy it is!!

Details on ROCKEY’S 5kg Home Biltong Maker as well as the new Turbo Model can be found by clicking on this link.

You can have a look at the BILTONG BUDDY here.

The specials for Christmas top

It is almost Christmas and especially with keeping surface mail delivery in mind it is now time to place your orders for your Christmas Tree presents from Biltongmakers !This is what we will do for all the readers of our newsletter this Christmas!

      Have a look here!

This exquisite hand made biltong cutter makes a lovely Christmas gift!

  • And ….. that’s not all!
    From now until December we will include with every order for one of our Biltong Makers, a free packet of our famous South African “Nice & Spicy” recipes complete with ALL the spices you need to make the dish.
  • Not enough yet? OK then …. we’ll give you a bunch of free biltong storage bags with every biltong maker ordered!

But hurry!

Surface mail orders go by sea and can take anywhere from 4-10 weeks to reach you. So, don’t put off what you can do today.
Make someone very happy this Christmas and place your order today!
Just click on Father Christmas to get to our shop (or click below).

Click here to go to our on-line shop.

[These special offers are for a limited period only, as long as present stocks last and can be changed without prior notice!]

Tips of the month top


Some useful tips

A tip on salt in Biltong …

Salt is the one thing that can ruin biltong – too much, or too little.

Many recipes call for you to use excess salt, and then wipe, rinse or shake off excess. You then also have to watch how long you leave it in the salt. These imprecise methods often lead to botched biltong.

Biltong needs to draw in about 20 – 30 grams of salt per kilogram of meat. Start at 25 grams salt per kilogram, and then move up or down as per your taste, together with your other favourite spices.
If you use this exact method, you need to allow at least 8 hours for the meat to soak up all the salt. Leaving the meat longer in this salt solution will not spoil it, as there is just enough salt for the meat to draw in, and no excess.
Turn the meat every 3 hours, to ensure that all pieces get a turn to be at the top, and the bottom.

I prefer fine table salt. The meat does not have to be wiped, rinsed or shaken, but can be hung up as is with all the lovely delicious other spices clinging to it.

Happy biltong making!

Roy Herselman
Pretoria, South Africa

Some more useful tips …
(do you have any, please let us know?)

    • Before you wear a new garment, put a little clear nail polish on the front and back of each button. Buttons will stay on longer when their threads are sealed.
    • Zippers won’t stick if you rub them with the edge of a bar of soap.
    • To remove a hem crease, sponge the material with white vinegar and press with a warm iron.
    • White shoe polish will apply more evenly if you rub the shoes with a raw potato or rubbing alcohol before polishing.
    • For longer lasting pantyhose, try freezing them before you wear them. Just wet, wring out and toss in a plastic bag to freeze. Thaw and hang to dry.
    • Fresh eggs are rough and chalky . They will sink and stay horizontal on the bottom of a glass of water. The egg-white is viscous and close around the plump yolk. Old eggs are smooth and shiny. They will float in a glass of water. The egg-white is watery and the yolk is flat in an egg roughly 3 weeks old.
    • To remove pesky bottle tops and jar lids, don a pair of rubber gloves. Or twist a fat rubber band around the lid, then twist open. Works like a charm.
    • Use top-quality typewriter correction fluid to cover nicks, chips, and scratches on enameled ranges and refrigerators, porcelain tiles, and sinks. Works like a charm and it comes in a variety of colors.
    • Apply spray starch to doors and to painted walls along hallways and stairways where fingerprints accumulate. The coating will resist marks better.
    • Place a piece of white chalk in your silver chest or jewel box to absorb moisture and help prevent tarnishing of silverware and jewelry.
    • Freezers run more efficiently when they’re three-quarters or more full. When provisions drop, fill milk cartons or jugs with water and put them in the freezer to take up empty space.
    • Wiping the inside of the fridge with vinegar helps prevent mildew because acid kills mildew fungus.
    • For a fresh smelling fridge, keep a box of baking soda, a can filled with charcoal or dried coffee grounds or a cotton ball soaked in vanilla extract inside of it.
    • Crumbled newspapers lining the vegetable compartments of a refrigerator will keep veggies crisp.
    • Drain de-clogger: 1/4 cup baking soda and 1/4 cup vinegar. Pour baking soda down drain first then follow with the vinegar. Close drain and let sit until bubbling has stopped then follow with a bucket of hot boiling water.
    • Store eggs with the large end up to keep the yolk centered.
    • For perfect hard-cooked eggs, cover the eggs with cold water and bring to a boil. Then turn off the heat and let the eggs sit on the burner for 10-15 minutes.
    • Refrigerate candles for several hours before lighting; it will cause fewer drips.
    • Have you ever peeled garlic or handled it and your hands smell to high heaven? The next time that happens, take any stainless steel bowl, pan or other stainless steel kitchen gadget and rub your hands on it. It will take away the smell of garlic.
    • Lemon extract will remove scuff marks from luggage.
    • Dry Mustard will remove onion odors from your hands or cutting board. Rub in, then rinse off.
  • Place bay leaves in kitchen drawers and in flour and sugar sacks to keep crawling insects away.

Our spices are Kosher and Halaal!

It will certainly interest our Jewish readers that our biltong spices are certified as being kosher by the Beth Din of Johannesburg. Anyone interested can mail us for a copy of the certification. (new 2008 certification is now available)
Our Muslim readers can rest assured that all our spices are certified Halaal by the Muslim Judicial Council Halaal Trust. A copy of the 2008 certificate is available on request.

South African Meat Cutting Charts


Below you will find three excellent meat cutting charts.

These are displayed with the compliments of SAMIC.
(The South African Meat Industry Company).
SAMIC has a very interesting web site as well as a weekly newsletter about anything to do with the
Meat Industry in South Africa.
Now, don’t think this is a totally boring web site (I thought so first) but it has some very interesting articles and statistics.

Beef Cutting Chart Pork Cutting Chart Lamb Cutting Chart
* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *

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Winter or summer, our charming Viennese building will make you feel right at home. As our guests’ well-being is a matter close to our hearts, the quiet residence offers every convenience from a microwave, dishwasher and washing machine to Satellite TV.

The Vienna city center is within 10 minutes walking distance. Public transport is right at the Guest house.

Our well-kept, 54 m² newly renovated non-smoking holiday flat is suitable for 1-4 people. It is central, quiet, charming and very reasonably priced.

For further information please see our website www.netland.at/wien/oberholzer

Questions and Answers top

As in every newsletter, here is our regular section with some of the many questions we receive from our readers all over the world.
If we have not given an answer and you can help these people could you please mail them?
(Please copy us in on your mails @ info@biltongmakers.com
so we can help other people who might have the same questions in the future)

QUESTION

Hi, This is a question from Israel.
We call it a poyke pot, and I wanted to ask you as an expert – what does the size represent?
I tried to think about it and found no reason in the sizes, like why is a size 1 pot 3 liters and a size 4 pot 9.3 liters. What do the numbers represent?
I couldn’t figure it out! Can you?

Thank you,
Margarita Balaklav
Israel
margarit.bala@gmail.com

QUESTION

I have a question about my Potjiepot and I hope you can help me with it.
I brought it 3 years ago from South Africa (in our backpack!) and yesterday used it again since a long time.
Before we started cooking in it, we cured and seasoned it as told in our Potjie cooking-book. (and we’ve used it several times)
So yesterday I just washed it and oiled it before starting. Still, our food tasted rusty afterwards and it occurred to me that it still stains from the inside.
Do you happen to know what i can do about it? Do we need to scrub it again? would a fire inside help in this case?
I don’t know… hope you are a specialist in this….!
Thanks in advance!

Best regards from Holland!
Judith Snijders
Holland
judithsnijders@hotmail.com

QUESTION

Hi there, Please can somebody help with regard to the salt.
We have purchased one of the Biltong Buddies, but I have a huge problem that I hope some one can help us with.
I cannot find Rock Salt anywhere here in Alberta, Canada.
I have only seen Coarse Salt and Pickling Salt. Both of these are like small peppercorns in size and very very salty.
A friend of ours here in Canada used one of these salts, but the biltong was too dry and very salty.

Much appreciated for anyone’s help.

Penny McLoughlin
Alberta, Canada
machome@shaw.ca

QUESTION

Hallo!

Earlier this year I visited South Africa and remembered the good taste of biltong and boerewors, and now I am going to try to make my own.
I wonder if you can dry biltong in the kitchen oven?
Looking forward to hearing from you

Best regards
Yvonne Sjölin-Caesar
Valdemarsvik, Sweden
info@vikensplat.se

QUESTION

Hello …!

Fabulous site.. I shall be ordering some boerewors spices soon!

A question if I may …. (well you did say if anybody wanted an SA recipe … just to ask!)

I have searched high and low for a Samoosa pastry recipe.
Most people in UK just use Filo or Spring roll pastry… But it’s not a patch on what my Gran used to make on the farm when I was little.
I remember her rolling it out, oiling it, folding it over and rolling again over and over till it was almost totally saturated with oil. It was tough and crisped up when the Samoosas were cooked.

And to cap it all, it stayed crisp for days…

Not like the stuff over here which goes soggy just half an hour after cooking.

If you could help me find a recipe for this I would be very pleased..

Kindest regards
Graham Page
England
dark-magic@boringmoo.co.uk

FEEDBACK

In response to the letter by Anne Paton that we published in our last newsletter as well as the piece by Bill Gates in our “Food for Thought” section in the same edition we had the following feedback.

Hi, just a note to tell you that the letter from Anne Paton was actually written 10 years ago. She is now 81 and says I quote from her response to its surfacing: “I am no longer a citizen of the country. I now live in England and want nothing to do with the South Africa. I have no regrets about leaving.”

And the Bill Gates thing – This is not from Bill Gates. It’s an excerpt from the book “Dumbing Down our Kids” by educator Charles Sykes.

Still, the letter from Anne is pretty powerful and incredibly sad whilst the Bill thing is unbelievably true.

Regards
Jeremy Dannheisser
Minuteman Press
Hyde Park, Sandton, South Africa

I quite enjoy reading your monthly newsletter for all the humour, recipes, contributions etc. and applaud your decision to drop the crime statistics, as they serve no useful purpose in my opinion.

To that end, why not also drop the overtly racist inclusions like the “dumb white kid” that also serve no useful purpose other than to inflame inherent racist passions. There are ALWAYS two sides to every story but some people can only ever see and believe that their argument is the only one that holds sway.

A bit more balance please.

Thanks for the Koeksuster recipe. I thought I had a few great ones many years ago, but this one beats them all.

Regards
Mel
Australia.

In reply to the many questions we get regarding a sausage maker the following feedback.

Kenwood (as in Kenwood mixer) produces a sausage attachment for their Kenwood Chef kitchen appliance. I believe they also make a mincer on its own with sausage spout.
When I got to New Zealand I bought a Kenwood Chef so it gets used for all the normal things and I get the benefit of using it to make sausages and they are awesome.

Cheers
Paul and Glenda Bing
Ohakune, New Zealand

Stoeptalk top

We ran this story in December 2005 but had to publish it again this month simply because …. well, read on and see how small our world really has become …

When Charlie shuffled and 60c was a lot …
By James Clarke

Some older readers may recall the Phoenix Restaurant in Bree Street, Johannesburg, when the city was a real city and people came to town in the evenings to see a film or eat out, or simply to window shop.

One could stroll about and one was hardly ever murdered.

The Phoenix, a very German restaurant, was across the road from the East Africa Pavilion. In the Pavilion the waiters wore red fezzes and white, floor-length robes and in the corner sat a punkah wallah – a man who pulled a string that caused a huge rectangular screen hanging from the ceiling (a punkah) to move back and forth creating a cooling draught.

The waiter at the Phoenix was named Charlie and he looked and shuffled about just like Manuel, the waiter from Barcelona in Fawlty Towers.

Charlie always had his thumb in the soup. It was expected of him. You took your friends there just to show them Charlie.

When we journalists were feeling flush in the 1960s we’d hotfoot it to the Phoenix and have an Eisbein and chips washed down with a Hansa draught beer from “South West Africa”.

Charlie appeared humourless but that was a false impression. I remember us ordering four coffees and Peter Hawthorne (who later joined Time) saying, “Charlie! Make sure my cup is clean, hey?”

Later, Charlie shuffled back with the four cups of coffee and said, deadpan, “Now, which one of you wanted a clean cup?”

The maitre d’ at the Phoenix was a young fellow named Gerhard Maritzen and the other day I found myself in a restaurant called The Berliner in Coachman’s Crossing, in Peter Place, Bryanston. And who should own it but Gerhard himself. He is now 64.

And on the wall was a menu from the Phoenix in 1967.

An eisbein with sauerkraut was 60c. It was the most expensive thing on the menu. A mixed grill cost 40c.

The soup of the day was free and one wasn’t even charged for Charlie’s famous thumbprint.

A dozen oysters cost R1,25. Crayfish was 60c, the same as sole meunière.

These dishes were all way beyond our pockets of course because, as journalists, we had to take a vow of poverty.

A plate of a dozen LM prawns was certainly beyond our pockets – at R1,30.

For 45c you could order roast pork and apple sauce with vegetables; German pot roast and dumplings; braised ox tongue in Madeira sauce and a host of other dishes.

Cheese with bread and butter was 15c – unless it was fancy cheese. Then it was 17c.

A tankard of draught beer was 25c. A bottle of Chateau Libertas was 70c (32c in bottle stores). If you were seriously wealthy you could order a bottle of Zonnebloem Cabernet at R1,40.

At Gerhard’s Berliner I ordered roast duck, potatoes and vegetables and a tankard of draught beer. I then had coffee and a port. When the bill came Gerhard charged me 1967 prices – 70c for the duck, 20c for the beer, and 13c for the port and 7c for the coffee – R1,10.

We fell into conversation with Gulhan, the waiter at the Berliner, about “the good old days” and I recalled how, around 1968, I was cross with my wife because she had allowed the month’s grocery bill to hit R62.00.

“How can you spend R62.00 in a month for groceries for a family of four?” I asked angrily.

I think she replied, “Just watch me!”

Gulhan said how nice it would be to go back to those times, so when my bill arrived for R1,10 I gave him R1,20 and told him he could keep the change.

And then ….. in April of this year I received a mail from Sonia Robinson who now lives in Australia ….. please read her mail.

Amazing!

From Sonia Robinson
Sent: 07 April 2008 06:20
To: lo@biltongmakers.com
Subject: – The Phoenix & Uncle Charlie

Dear Lo

What a small place Cyberspace has made the world!

I was feeling a bit nostalgic the other day so I decided to explore the internet in the hope of finding some information regarding our old restaurant – The Phoenix in Jo’burg on the corner Bree & Harrison Street.

Your web page displayed itself – (what a great website !). Under the “Stoeptalk” by James Clarke was a (I think it was in 2007 or 2005) a delightful article about Uncle Charlie and the incredible value meals you could get at the Phoenix in those days.

I just had to write to you (and your readers of course) about the Phoenix.

My Dad Fritz Ott (Pappilein, Mom Anita Ott (Mutti) and my brother Fritz Ott (Bubi) jnr – owned, lived and breathed the Phoenix!

Pappilein bought it off dear Mrs. Eiverson at what must have been before the Dead Sea died. It seemed like we lived at the Phoenix for an eternity, was it 30 years?

There are numerous memories as a child growing up in Jo’burg, but none are as vivid as growing up in what truly was then one of the most popular German Restaurants in town – The Phoenix!

Bubi and I where always on the look out for a giggle and decided to play “I spy with my little eye”. Needless to say we had the most varied selection of patrons to spy on believe you me!
Some of them seemed to adopt a most unusual glow and what they obviously thought was a superior singing voice to Mario Lanza!( surely the Glüwein and Beer was not to blame!?)

Anyway, this day we surreptitiously placed ourselves on the overhanging veranda roof, clinging on to the gutter for support.
Down below the restaurant was alive and buzzing – as always.

Hundreds of scrumptious meals pouring out of the kitchen and countless gallons of German Beer were being consumed. We were in particular awe at the sight of a certain lady’s platinum coloured Beehive hairdo and decided to see if we could land some smelly Sauerkraut right slap bang in the middle of her bizarre edifice.

In order to achieve this we had to peer over the edge just that little but further than usual and in doing so …., well, the last thing I remember was seeing my dear brother spattered in Auntie Beehive’s soup plate. Luckily only his behind and pride where hurt!

Does anyone out there remember a good section of the Phoenix burning down? Well, that happened like this; Bubi and I decided to try our hands at smoking cigarettes. We lived what we called “oben” – upstairs. The best place to achieve this was to sneak under the bed and light up. In the process the mattress caught fire and before we knew it the fire had spread downstairs to the bar/restaurant area.

Thank goodness no one was hurt but for our poor prides, petite backsides and Pappileins bank balance!

We identified with every little corner shop that stayed open late and sold the “infamous” skinny mini slabs of Cadbury chocolates and gold coins for 1 cent.
I still buy them today but for $5!
In those days it was quite safe to explore the streets at night on your tricycle, dressed in your “jarmies”!

Oh, how well do I remember “Uncle Charlie”, the finger in the soup and his quick manner which everybody adored, he was a total part of the whole scene a total part of what was the “Phoenix”.

People used to queue up just for the honour of being served by him!
He was MY uncle Charlie, my Godfather and holds a very special place in my heart – even 43 years down the line!

I will till the end of time recall trying to help him out with serving meals and when his back was turned I mimicked his famous Charlie Chaplain walk and in total admiration practised his talk.

Wer hatt die saubere tasse bestelt? ” – Which one of you ordered the clean cup?

The Phoenix and our dear Uncle Charlie was a long time ago but memories are as fresh as yesterday.

Sincerely

Sonia (Schatzi) nee Ott

As we always do when we receive mails from people, we ask if we can use their story in our news letter. This was Sonia’s reply to us ….

Good morning Lo

It’s morning here , in New South Wales, Australia. we are 8 hours ahead you – isn’t it strange to think we see the sun rise before you do!

I must say , it was a big stab in the dark writing to you. Websites come and go, email addresses change …. so I was so chuffed to receive a reply from you.

Of course I don’t mind you using my letter in a future newsletter , who knows maybe there will be a lightbulb moment for someone and, in a way we can honour Uncle Charlie who passed away a long time ago and my darling Pappilein who passed away 14 years ago, rather tragically in Rhodesia.

My mom and brother are still (just) surviving in what must be one of the most trying periods in Zimbabwean history.

Hope you have a really good day ,

Regards
Sonia

Recipe Corner top


Braai Recipes

Beer marinated Beef Steaks
(Serves 4)

Your shopping basket must have:

4 large (lean) Beef Steaks ( cut of your choice) (So’n stukkie vet daaraan is ook lekker!)

For the Beer Marinade:

  • 60ml olive oil
  • 185ml beer
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 small onion, finely sliced
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 5 -10ml soy sauce
  • 15ml brown sugar


Now, grab a beer and get to work:

  • Mix together the marinade ingredients in a small pan and bring to the boil.
  • Remove from heat and cool completely.
  • Place steaks in large dish so they don’t overlap.
  • Pour over the marinade and leave for 1-2 hours.
  • Braai over hot coals for 4- 5 minutes per side for rare and 7-8 minutes per side for medium, basting frequently with marinade.
  • Any leftover marinade can be re-boiled and served with the steak.

Pap with Tomato and Onion Gravy

Stywepap

  • 1 liter water
  • 10ml salt
  • 30ml butter
  • 375g (625ml) mealie meal


Tomato and Onion Gravy

  • 30ml oil
  • 2 large onions, sliced
  • 1-2 cloves of garlic, crushed
  • 1 x 400g can chopped tomatoes
  • 1 x 400g can of tomato puree
  • 125ml dry white wine
  • 15ml Worcester sauce
  • 5ml mixed dried herbs
  • 10ml brown sugar
  • 5ml salt and freshly ground black pepper


How to make it:

  • Pour water into large pan, add salt and butter and bring to the boil.
  • Pour in mealie meal to form a pyramid in the pot.
  • Cover with lid and cook for 5 minutes.
  • Now stir mealie meal thoroughly using a wooden spoon.
  • Replace lid, lower heat to minimum and cook for another 20-30 minutes.
  • Serve with tomato gravy.


For the gravy:

  • Heat the oil in a pan.
  • Fry the onions till soft.
  • Add garlic.
  • Add remaining ingredients and allow gravy to simmer for 15 minutes.
  • Serve hot spooned over pap

 

Click below for our handy cooking converter

Bits and pieces from South Africa top

I managed to find someone else (the one other?) that thinks the same about SA …. It has been taken from the News24 column (still my homepage):
Bye for now, Carla

Staying in South Africa
(By Georgina Guedes 18-09-2008)

I have just returned from two weeks in London. I had a wonderful time, saw my friends, ate at some fine establishments, used fabulous public transport, but at the end of it all, I am very, very happy to be back home.

I was in London to attend a friend’s wedding, and the week before the wedding, I took part in the hen party, which started out as a fairly laid-back affair, but soon turned to debauchery.

At some point, a group of girls – all of them South Africans living in London – started to discuss South Africa. They mentioned that a friend of theirs, living in South Africa, had sent them an email discussing the glorious weather that we’d been having.

But then, a week later, the same friend wrote to tell of the hijacking of a family member, and the unanimous conclusion among all the overseas South Africans was that a bit of good weather wasn’t worth the daily risk to your safety.

It’s an interesting conundrum, and those of us living in South Africa have obviously made the other decision – that weather, space and quality of life are worth the risk of becoming a victim of crime.

The London Lifestyle

I love London, I love visiting there, and I love how cultural activities catering to just about every interest and way of thinking are available every day. But every time I visit and stay with a friend, I look at their lifestyle and am very grateful that it’s not mine.

Life in London is hard work, and it’s expensive. There may be a world of cultural and epicurean opportunities available to everyone who lives there, but they cost so much that they can’t be taken advantage of that often. And as soon as they have kids, people have less time and less money, and babysitters are so expensive, that they actually never leave the house.

The weather is terrible. It’s there every day. Every day, the dank, damp, endless grayness casts a shroud over London. It’s miserable. Aside from the impact this has on mood, the laundry never dries.

The weather is a big factor, because in London there is no space, so a family of four might live in the equivalent of a starter apartment in South Africa. The entire interior space is perpetually draped with laundry, because it won’t dry in the fine drizzle perpetually soaking whatever postage stamp of exterior place the home might have.

So you want to get out, and you can, but you need to don a rain coat, take an umbrella, put the rain cover down on your child’s pram, and then you wander haplessly in your local park (because getting on the public transport in this get up is pretty intolerable and no one drives in London), where you can’t do anything much anyway, because all of this paraphernalia doesn’t lend itself to unbridled romping in the fields.

The public transport is great, and as a visitor to London, for me, the novelty hasn’t worn off. I ride the tubes for the joy of riding the tubes (and locals think I’m odd). But I could see how having a daily route to work, in peak times that required me to be sardined into a cramped and often smelly space with a thousand other bored commuters could start to get me down. Londoners hate the tubes, and with a little imagination, it’s not hard to see why.

And as convenient as the public transport might seem, it does limit you to your own area. Best friends who live at opposite ends of London don’t see each other for months because the idea of traveling the distance is unbearable. And if you don’t make arrangements months in advance, you won’t even get to see the people in your own area – that’s just how London works.

There’s no popping in for a braai when the fancy takes you, no dropping in because you were in the area, and no casual phone calls to say, “we’re having breakfast down the road, why don’t you join us?”

Be part of the solution

Then there’s South Africa. As a nation, we have huge problems – there’s no denying it. But we’re also a country with so much potential. I want to stay here and be part of the solution, part of a country that can show the rest of the world that democracy can work in Africa, and decisions can be made for the good of everyone.

And people talk about the racism (from both sides), and the crime, and the financial uncertainty, but I think that most South Africans are an optimistic bunch who just want what’s best for their country.

On my first evening back home, I took my dog for a walk in my local park. As we made our way along the trail, I encountered so many people – black and white – who make eye contact, smile and say hi. This is in stark contrast to London, where a greeting is met with suspicion, or if it’s returned, a curt nod of the head is all that will be proffered.

I felt great to be home, among people who really do want to make a connection. We’re going to be OK. We’ve just got to try to get the national mood up.

Georgina Guedes is a freelance journalist. She loves her house, her garden, her dog, her park, the weather and the people of her country.

The death of Johannesburg
(by Liezl MacClean)

Johannesburg is a unique city – it is the hub of South Africa’s and the subcontinent’s linkages to the global economy. It is Africa’s only world city with many assets other cities all over the world would be proud of. Nonetheless the trends indicate that Johannesburg is slipping to the bottom of the list of secondary world cities in terms of a number of important indicators. Its deterioration would be perceived as reflecting a nation in serious trouble. A failing Johannesburg means a failing South Africa.

Hence a blog created to illustrate the collapse and physical destruction of Johannesburg in the “New South Africa”. The blog entitled “The Death of Johannesburg” shows a range of before and after images of what Johannesburg once was, and the shocking reality of what it is today.

It starts with welcoming you to Bree Street, which was one of the main thoroughfares running through the city centre of Johannesburg, from east to west and used to be one of the major economic centers, as well as being a residential area.

“Today, it is a slum, another shattered, filthy, ruined monument to the New South Africa,” the blog states.

Moreover it shows The Carlton Hotel, once the flagship in the world of construction, which was a rich status symbol for Johannesburg; an internationally renowned establishment where the moneyed and the famous wined, dined and slept in style.

The five-star hotel – in an upside-down Y-shape that abutted the lofty Carlton Centre, South Africa’s tallest building – was always a proud reminder to Jo’burgers that their hospitality was among the best in the world. Henry Kissinger, Francois Mitterrand, Hilary Clinton, Margaret Thatcher, Whitney Houston and Mick Jagger were among the hotel’s guests during its history.

“The 600-room hotel, which took seven years to build, opened in 1972 – and closed in 1997 — because it became too dangerous for people to stay there, attacked as they were if they dared venture out into the surrounding streets,” according to the blog.

Today it stands empty, a slowly crumbling and deserted ruin, stripped of its finishings.

Another problem Johannesburg’s inner city faces, is the amount of immigrants living in the abandoned buildings.

These poorer residents are driven to cheaper accommodation in abandoned buildings run by ‘slumlords’ who subdivide the building into rabbit warrens of rooms with inadequate ablution facilities.

Last month the City of Johannesburg welcomed the legal certainty surrounding unsafe buildings, according to an article published on BuaNews.

The city pointed out that it was already following an approach of meaningful engagement with residents in a statement responding to a Constitutional Court judgment.

“The Constitutional Court’s judgment vindicates the City’s position that it was within its administrative rights to eliminate unsafe and unhealthy buildings and to remove people from such structures for their own safety,” according to the city’s official website.

The city managers often find themselves in the invidious position of being criticised when they evict people from these unhealthy and overcrowded living conditions, and equally condemned, if residents die as a result of fires in these unsafe buildings.

Parts of the city no longer consist of an integrated network of streets and neighbourhoods but rather a set of arterial roads giving access to a proliferation of cluster developments enclosed by high walls and security fences. Private developers trade on the reputation of Jo’burg as the crime capital to sell these safe and secure gated communities. Entry and exit occurs via private car with little chance of neighbourly encounters outside of the gated community. The only pedestrian activity in the road is that of domestic workers walking to the nearest taxi stop.

What has happened to the most prosperous, advanced city in Africa?

Johannesburg is no longer a mining city; it is neither a significant manufacturing city nor a public sector city; it is not a leading leisure or tourism city. In many respects, Johannesburg stands or falls by its ‘World City’ status; the fact that it is home to corporate headquarters, finance houses, legal, accounting, advertising, IT, and media services of a subcontinent.

Those responsible for managing the city and planning its future therefore bear an enormous responsibility for maintaining its ranking as a world city.

Can you imagine …

Can you imagine working for a company that has a little more than 500 employees and has the following statistics:

  • 29 have been accused of spousal abuse
  • 7 have been arrested for fraud
  • 19 have been accused of writing bad cheques
  • 117 have directly or indirectly bankrupted at least 2 businesses
  • 3 have done time for assault
  • 71 cannot get a credit card due to bad credit
  • 14 have been arrested on drug-related charges
  • 8 have been arrested for shoplifting
  • 21 are currently defendants in lawsuits
  • 84 have been arrested for drunk driving in the last year

373 in total or approximately 70%!

Can you guess which organization this is?

Give up yet?

It’s the 535 members of the SOUTH AFRICAN PARLIAMENT –
(The same group that cranks out hundreds of new laws each year designed to keep the rest of us in line!)

Around the World top

Bits and Bobs from people around the world

Hello Biltong Team!

I’ve just found your cooking converter and as a professional chef I find it very interesting. I’ve already saved it as a Favourite!

I’m a bit of a sloppy chef and what with working all over the world I find my recipes, as I’ve adapted things over the years, are often a mixture of Imperial, Metric and a few cup measures which is okay for me cos I’m used to working with these bashed about recipes.

But when people ask me for a recipe I’m often embarrassed at how much of a mess the weights and measures are!

I’d really like to see added to your fantastic cooking converter all the weights of a cup measure of the various different baking ingredients.

Obviously a cup of butter is heavier than a cup of flour and a cup of sugar is somewhere between the weight of the fat and the weight of the flour, but by how much would be great to know! That way I could sit down and standardize my recipes without going to the bother of actually weighting everything myself!

Even without this info your cooking converter will be a great help to me. Thank you for posting it!

Regards
Rachel Muse
England

Hello Readers,

My name is Ian Dunn.

My family and I moved to Christchurch New Zealand in August 2001. We were from a tiny little Dorpie called Dannhauser in Northern Natal where I farmed and my wife worked at a private hospital in neighbouring Newcastle.

We felt that things would improve in South Africa after 1994, but to our disappointment things went from bad to worse.
After having neighbours, friends and family either attacked, murdered or badly assaulted we decided that the Grass Was Greener on the Other Side.
To cut a long story short we arrived in New Zealand as residents, and were given all the benefits of a Pukka New Zealander such as schooling, medical etc. etc

One of the first things that struck us was how clean everything was, and I am not just talking about the streets.
You can stand on a bridge and look at the bed of the Avon River which flows through Christchurch. That’s how clear the water is in the middle of a town!

All the parks have kids playing areas, with swings, slides and Foofy Slides( Flying Foxes here) and kids are playing in them without any worries.
I also am still very aware of the fact that the pavements are clear, no hawkers and/or fruit markets which is so normal on the typical South African sidewalk.

Initially we rented a house and after living on a farm it was difficult to accept that we were now not allowed any form of animal in the house.
So for 3 years we would go to the local pet shops and look at the puppies on display so we could get a little bit of an animal fix.
After saving for 3 years we could afford our Mortgage and are now proud owners of our own house, a Jack Russel and a Black Labrador!

After initially buying Biltong from some fellow Expats who charged exorbitant prices, I was so excited to discover the Biltongmakers Web site, and promptly ordered a Biltong Buddy (the 2 kg Biltong Maker).
This works like magic but has one drawback …. it’s too small for us because no sooner have I made a batch and it is gobbled up!

Luckily wors is readily available at supermarkets and butcheries so we can have typical SA Braais on balmy summer evenings.

We love living in New Zealand and our children have just flourished at school,sport and you name it.

We often talk about life back in Africa, however here is one family that knows it made the right decision leaving.

The grass here is greener for us!!

Cheers from a very Cool Christchurch.

Ian Dun and family (and dogs)
Christchurch, New Zealand

Come on guys and dolls. Your story here the next time?

Something to smile about top

Another couple “shorties” that keep flowing in daily

Don’t eat chicken sandwiches, no matter what …..

A little boy and a little girl attended the same school and became friends.
Every day they would sit together to eat their lunch. They discovered that they both
Brought chicken sandwiches every day! This went on all through the fourth and fifth
Grades, until one day he noticed that her sandwich wasn’t a chicken sandwich.
He said, ‘Hey, how come you’re not eating chicken, don’t you like it anymore?’
She said ‘I love it but I have to stop eating it.’

‘Why?’ he asked.
She pointed to her lap and said ‘Cause I’m starting to grow little feathers down there!’
‘Let me see’ he said.
‘Okay’ and she pulled up her skirt.
He looked and said, ‘That’s right. You are! Better not eat any more chicken.’
He kept eating his chicken sandwiches until one day he brought peanut butter. He said
To the little girl, ‘I have to stop eating chicken sandwiches, I’m starting to get feathers
Down there too!’ She asked if she could look, so he pulled down his pants for her!

She said ‘Oh, my Goodness, it’s too late for you! You’ve already got the NECK and GIBLETS!!!

A man of few words

Mildred, the church gossip, self-appointed monitor of the church’s morals,
kept sticking her nose into other people’s business.

Several members did not approve of her extra curricular activities, but feared her enough to maintain their silence.

She made a mistake, however, when she accused Henry, a new member, of being
an alcoholic after she saw his old pickup truck parked in front of the
town’s only bar one afternoon.

She emphatically told Henry and several others that everyone seeing it there would know what he was doing.

Henry, a man of few words, stared at her for a moment and just turned and
walked away.

He didn’t explain, defend, or deny. He said nothing.

Later that evening, Henry quietly parked his pickup in front of Mildred’s
house . . . walked home . . . and left it there all night.

You have to love people like Henry.

Lie-Clocks

A man died and went to heaven. As he stood in front of St. Peter at the Pearly Gates, he saw a huge wall of clocks behind him. He asked, “What are all those clocks for?”

St. Peter answered, “Those are Lie-Clocks. Everyone on Earth has a Lie-Clock. Every time you lie the hands on your clock will move.”

“Oh,” said the man, “Whose clock is that?”

“That’s Mother Teresa’s. The hands have never moved, indicating that she never told a lie.”

“Incredible,” said the man. “And whose clock is that one?”

St. Peter responded, “That’s Abraham Lincoln’s clock. The hands have moved twice, telling us that Abe told only two lies in his entire life.”

“Where’s Jacob Zuma’s?” asked the man.

“Zuma’s clock is in God’s office. He’s using it as a fan.”

Sport talk top

Snippets from the papers

Secret of bizarre Springbok rituals
Former logistics manager of SA’s Under-21 rugby squad, Neil de Beer, has shed some light into the secret initiation involving new Springboks
Full Story …

Switch-station will light up 2010 stadium
A new state-of-the-art Swiss-built electrical switch-station on the Foreshore will make sure there’s enough power to light up Cape Town’s 2010 stadium
Full Story…

On the chopping block
South Africa’s rugby emblem could soon be a thing of the past if ANC critics have their way
Full story …

How Madiba saved the Springbok
There are many stories told of how Nelson Mandela saved the Springbok emblem from extinction, but the best is the tale of a meeting with Mluleki George
Full Story …

Worry about 2010 VIPs, not the creeping costs
Hooligans “are welcome” to attend the World Cup and as for other “undesirables” – by 2010 they may well be VIP guests, cabinet has heard.
Full Story…

Blatter admits having two 2010 back-ups
Fifa president Sepp Blatter has said the organisation also had had a contingency plan for Germany in 2006.
Full Story…

New Sport Magazine

The other day we received a mail from Jason Whitfield telling us about a new sport magazine in London. Have a look here. Perhaps you find something interesting in there.

Let’s hear from you too!! top

Come on, let’s hear from you too!!

You are probably sitting at the computer right now so how about a small (or big) contribution? It does not have to be about Biltong or such. We’d love to hear where you live and how you have adapted yourself to your new life style and surroundings.
Let our readers enjoy your story!

You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask? Or perhaps you have read something of interest that you might want to share?
Perhaps you have some advice to give?

You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Share it with other people around the world!

Click right here to start now or you can mail us at webmaster@biltongmakers.com

Boerewors for Europe and the UK top


Boerewors (Europe and UK only, sorry people!)

Summer is well on its way and our boerewors has once again proven to be a hit with South Africans and local people alike for the 7th year in a row!
We are making fresh batches of around 150 kg every week at the moment and are hardly keeping up. Especially our neighbours in the South of Europe are shipping it by the “truck load”!

This is the first year we actually ran out twice!
But, ‘n boer maak ‘n plan’ so we have enough fresh stock available most of the time.
To place an order just click on the picture or on www.boerewors.be and fill in the order form.
You can either collect or we can mail it to you.

All our customers in Holland, Belgium and in fact, all over Europe are raving about the packing of and the condition in which the wors arrived at their doorsteps.

Just imagine some “lekker” pap and wors with a nice tomato and onion sauce!(See the recipe section!)

Complete the order form you will find by going to www.boerewors.be or give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25.

Our Boerewors is vacuum packed in quantities of about 500 gram.
Like with everything else the price has increased slightly because of the increase in the price of meat, spices and casings. Our spices from South Africa have gone up by no less than 43% and there is a big shortage of casings we are told because China is buying up whatever they can get hold of!

Our normal price at the moment is € 9.25 per kg but for the time being we will keep it at only € 8.45 per kg!!

You can also place your order by simply clicking here.

Droëwors around the world top


Droëwors …… a typical South African delicacy all of its own!

Droëwors, as it is known in South Africa, is as much part of the country’s culinary culture as Biltong, Pap, Boerewors and Potjiekos.
The spices are of course imported especially from South Africa so you will get the “real” thing!

Fresh droëwors is available right now and we normally have ample stock.

The price is € 45.00 € 30.00 per 1kg pack or € 4.50 € 4.00 per 100 gram packet.

Droëwors (like biltong) travels well and posting is an ideal option.
We can mail it to you anywhere in the world via priority mail in minimum quantities of 500 gram.

You can place your order now by going to www.boerewors.be, give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.

Now also available at

DE WIJN KRAAL
The South African Wine Specialist Store in Leuven, Belgium.
Telephone 016 58.46.06


top

Biltong for all our readers! top


Biltong …… once hooked you’re a slave forever!

Biltong is without doubt the snack most associated with South Africa!
It is so much part of South African culture that there is no food related shop that will not stock it. You find it literally anywhere.
Say Biltong and you say South Africa!

Biltongmakers.Com has for more than 13 years supplied their Home Biltong Makers to South African expats all over the world so they could make their own biltong away from home.

We were often asked why we don’t make Biltong ourselves and then make it available to the poor and deprived South Africans living away from the Mother Country!
The requests have been relentless and constant so we decided to give it a go on a temporary basis. Just to see how well it would sell.

So, from now on you will be able to get your biltong directly from us.
The spices are of course imported from South Africa so you will get the “real” taste like “back home”!

The price is Euro 55.00 45.00 per 1kg vacuum pack or Euro 5.50 4.75 per 100 gram packet.

Biltong travels well and posting is an ideal option.
We can mail it to you anywhere in the world via priority mail.

To place your order please go to www.biltongmakers.be and click on one of the order form links. You can also call us on +32 (16) 53.96.25

We will get right back to you with how much the postage will be.

(For countries outside the EU we must mention that we are not responsible for packets confiscated by customs.

Now also available at

DE WIJN KRAAL
The South African Wine Specialist Store in Leuven, Belgium.
Telephone 016 58.46.06


top

Pig or Lamb on the Spit top


Pig or Lamb on the Spit ……. something special!

Well, this summer (so far) has certainly seen some lambs and piglets on the spit! On August 23rd we did our last one for a while. We need a rest!!

Although we are now well into the Autumn there is still a chance to have a spit party! Spitbraais (barbecues) can be done well into October.
So, if you want to be part of the fun and really impress your friends, colleagues or other acquaintances, book now!

Lamb or pig on the Spit is a way of entertaining as only known by very few mainly because it is thought to be very expensive ……. Not so!

We will do a Spit Barbecue for parties of between 30 and 50 people from just € 19.50 per person.

Together with the meat we will treat you to a big pot of curried potatoes, a tomato/salsa salad as well as an incredible Tzatziki (cucumber, yoghurt and mint) salad. Garlic or bread rolls are included as well. And, don’t forget the mint sauce with the lamb and the apple sauce with the piggy!
For venues more than 50 km from our home base in Keerbergen there is a small transport fee.

Start planning now for those special occasions! Just keep in mind that quite a number of dates up to October are already booked!
Remember that we are doing these functions only during weekends.

Booking early is essential and you can do so on
+32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.
(A Lamb or pig on the Spit can only be done outside because we cook on coals!)


Subscribing and Unsubscribing top

Perhaps you would like to subscribe to this newsletter or tell a friend about Biltongmakers.Com! and the incredible Biltong Makers!! You can be included in this newsletter by clicking on the following link.
Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

If you prefer not to receive email from us, you can unsubscribe from Biltongmakers.Com! by clicking on this link.
Unsubscribe me please.

April 2008

 

The home of Biltong, Boerewors, Potjiekos and much, much more!


Click here to find out more!

The Biltongmakers.Com Newsletter
April 2008
You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
If you do not wish to receive this newsletter you may unsubscribe at the bottom where you will find an automatic email link. Just click on that and send. Your name will then be permanently deleted from our database.
If you, your family or your friends want to subscribe to the newsletter please click on this link.

Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!
In this Newsletter

 

 

From the editor

DISCLAIMER

The information and contributions contained in this newsletter are received from various readers local and international. Views and opinions reflected in our newsletter are not necessarily those of Biltongmakers.Com and its team members.


Keerbergen
BelgiumThe unopened clay casingThe small explosion coming from the kitchen could be heard at the bar table outside. Very quickly a grayish cloud of dust came wafting out of the kitchen door and a gray dust settled all over the surfaces.

Everybody ran outside for cover and to get away from the horrendous smell of rotten egg.

I had just tried to open one of those thousand year old eggs I brought back from Singapore in December 2006!

It exploded in my face. (talk about egg on your face!)

I am always one for bringing back absolutely useless and strange things from far away countries. This time it was one of those raw duck eggs wrapped in gray clay and I was going to show Hans and Joan (who were there for lunch) how nice it was to eat one of those things!

I don’t know what was worse, the smell, my guests retching outside or the look I got from June!

Anyway, that was another one to write off to experience.

Never again!

But, then ….. I had to see what a thousand year old egg is really all about. Surely, I could not have made such a mistake out of total ignorance.

This is what I found.

Preserved duck eggs are a traditional Chinese delicacy, and although known as “1000-year-old eggs” they are rarely more than 100 days old. (So mine was a rarity at almost 500 days!)
Yum-Yum!!It is a common dish, sometimes known as pidan, that is made by coating duck or chicken eggs in a clay-like plaster of red earth, garden lime, salt, wood ash, and tea. To prevent the eggs from sticking, and for an attractive presentation, the chef advises layering and wrapping individual eggs in rice husks and packing them into an airtight container.

(Needless to say that I did none of the above of course. Just left it in an egg cup on a kitchen shelf looking pretty)

The preserved duck egg is smooth and creamy like an avocado, with a greenish yolk, and a no-longer-white white that is compared to the color of blackish amber or black opal, with hints of yellow, blue, and green hues. The flavor is “rich, pungent and cheese-like.”
Serving suggestion: Cut in wedges and serve with sweet pickled vegetables or a sauce of vinegar, soy sauce, rice wine, and minced ginger. Yum!

Or, as the old Latin adage says: “de gustibus non est disputandum” (there’s no accounting for taste)!

Much better were Joan’s vetkoeke.

I had not had any of those for yonks and when we went around there a couple of weeks ago she was busy making these vetkoeke the size of rugby balls.
Wow!
The last time I remember having one of those was when Kel came to fetch me at home in Linbro park and took me to the other side of Pretoria where, according to him, you could get the best vetkoeke and mince in the world! They were good, but not half as good as Joan’s!
After eating Joan’s vetkoeke Kel would certainly have changed his mind!


It’s been a couple of months since our last newsletter and if it wasn’t for the hundreds of emails we keep on getting, asking where the next one is, I would still be procrastinating.

So here we are. It’s April already and the first quarter of the year is behind us. How time flies. Just the other day we were on holiday in Turkey.

But, that is the life we lead. We rush around not counting those precious seconds, minutes, hours and days we sometimes just throw away by ignoring how precious they really are and doing something more than let them just pass by.


This month it will be 13 years since Biltongmakers started going. I can’t believe it sometimes. Those early days when Kel designed his first Biltong Maker and we started playing around with a little web design program to see if we could make ourselves famous!

How little did we know and how much has been learned.

But, here we are.
The Biltong Buddy, Rockey’s Biltong maker and our large Industrial Cabinets are taking a place of pride in kitchens and butcheries all over the world in countries as far flung as Taiwan, Singapore, Russia, Khazakstan, Barbados, Florida, Iceland, Australia, the USA, Europe and, ah well, too many to mention.
And while one always has some unhappy customers these are very few and far between the thousands upon thousands of people who are very happy that they can make their own biltong so far away from home. Their emails and letters tells us that daily.

Needless to say, it also makes us happy. Happy to be able to provide a service that gives a little of “the home country” to those so far away.

And so we, in the northern hemisphere go into our summer and our friends “Down South” into their winter. I hope you will have a good one, whichever it may be.

Till the next time,
Take care,

Lo

 



” The biggest mistake people make in life is not making a living at doing what they most enjoy.”
-Malcolm S. Forbes


When life hands you lemons, ask for tequila and salt and call me over!!

Point to ponder …


11 things you will not learn at school …

Bill Gates recently gave a speech at a high school graduation in the US.
Gates listed 11 things that, in his view, you will not learn in school.
His concern – that feel good, politically correct teaching has created a generation of kids with little concept of reality who have been set up for failure in the real world.

His advice is as follows:

 

  1. Life is not fair – get used to it!
  2. The world won’t care about your self-esteem. The world will expect you to accomplish something BEFORE you feel good about yourself.
  3. You will NOT make $60,000 a year right out of high school. You won’t be a vice-president with a car phone until you earn both.
  4. If you think your teacher is tough, wait till you get a boss.
  5. Flipping hamburgers is not beneath your dignity. Your Grandparents had a different word for burger flipping: they called it opportunity.
  6. If you mess up, it’s not your parents’ fault, so don’t whine about your mistakes, learn from them.
  7. Before you were born, your parents weren’t as boring as they are now. They got that way from paying your bills, cleaning your clothes and listening to you talk about how cool you thought you were. So before you save the rain forest from the parasites of your parent’s generation, try de-lousing the closet in your own room.
  8. Your school may have done away with winners and losers, but life HAS NOT. In some schools, they have abolished failing grades and they’ll give you as MANY TIMES as you want to get the right answer. This doesn’t bear the slightest resemblance to ANYTHING in real life.
  9. Life is not divided into semesters. You don’t get summers off and very few employers are interested in helping you FIND YOURSELF. Do that in your own time.
  10. Television is NOT real life. In real life people actually have to leave the coffee shop and go to jobs.
  11. Be nice to nerds. Chances are you’ll end up working for one.

 

Story of the month



Daylight Saving Time

To many of us Daylight Saving Time is a way of life. But have you ever stood still by what it is and, more important, the funny and strange things that can happen when you add or remove an hour to your day?
Origin
In the ancient water clock on the right, a series of gears rotated a cylinder to display hour lengths appropriate for each day’s date.
Although not punctual in the modern sense, ancient civilizations adjusted daily schedules to the sun more flexibly than modern DST does, often dividing daylight into twelve equal hours regardless of day length, so that each daylight hour was longer during summer.

For example, Roman water clocks had different scales for different months of the year: at Rome’s latitude the third hour from sunrise, hora tertia, started by modern standards at 09:02 solar time and lasted 44 minutes at the winter solstice, but at the summer solstice it started at 06:58 and lasted 75 minutes.
After ancient times, equal-length civil hours eventually supplanted unequal, so civil time no longer varies by season. Unequal hours are still used in a few traditional settings, such as some Mount Athos monasteries.

Benjamin Franklin (below) suggested firing cannons at sunrise to waken Parisians.

During his time as an American envoy to France, Benjamin Franklin,author of the proverb, “Early to bed, and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise”, anonymously published a letter suggesting that Parisians economize on candles by rising earlier to use morning sunlight.

This 1784 satire proposed taxing shutters, rationing candles, and waking the public by ringing church bells and firing cannons at sunrise.
Franklin did not propose DST; like ancient Rome, 18th-century Europe did not keep accurate schedules. However, this soon changed as rail and communication networks came to require a standardization of time unknown in Franklin’s day.

It was William Willett who invented DST and advocated it tirelessly.

This prominent English builder and outdoorsman invented DST in 1905 during one of his pre-breakfast horseback rides, when he observed with dismay how many Londoners slept through the best part of a summer day.
An avid golfer, he also disliked cutting short his round at dusk. His solution was to advance the clock during the summer months, a proposal he published two years later.
He lobbied unsuccessfully for the proposal until his death in 1915.

Germany, its World War I allies, and their occupied zones were the first European nations to use Willett’s invention, starting April 30, 1916.
Britain, most of its allies, and many European neutrals soon followed suit. Russia and a few other countries waited until the next year and the United States adopted it in 1918.
Since then, the world has seen many enactments, adjustments, and repeals.[20]

When do we change our clocks?

Most of the United States begins Daylight Saving Time at 2:00 a.m. on the second Sunday in March and reverts to standard time on the first Sunday in November. In the U.S., each time zone switches at a different time.

In the European Union, Summer Time begins and ends at 1:00 a.m. Universal Time (Greenwich Mean Time). It begins the last Sunday in March and ends the last Sunday in October.
In the EU all time zones change at the same moment.

During DST clocks are turned forward an hour, effectively moving an hour of daylight from the morning to the evening.

This year the change over date for Europe was March 30th. For the US it was on March 9th.

When in the morning?

In the EU clocks change at 1:00 a.m. Universal Time. In spring clocks spring forward from 12:59 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. In the autumn clocks fall back from 1:59 a.m. to 1:00 a.m.

Incidents and Anecdotes

Throughout its long and fascinating history, daylight saving time has had a remarkable impact on a wide variety of unexpected areas–from Middle East terrorism to feuding twin cities, voter turnout to time-change riots, radio stations to trick-or-treaters, and opera performances to manslaughter charges.

Draft Status, Vietnam War
A man, born just after 12:00 a.m. DST, circumvented the Vietnam War draft by using a daylight saving time loophole. When drafted, he argued that standard time, not DST, was the official time for recording births in his state of Delaware in the year of his birth. Thus, under official standard time he was actually born on the previous day–and that day had a much higher draft lottery number, allowing him to avoid the draft.

Bombing Thwarted
In September 1999, the West Bank was on Daylight Saving Time while Israel had just switched back to standard time. West Bank terrorists prepared time bombs and smuggled them to their Israeli counterparts, who misunderstood the time on the bombs. As the bombs were being planted, they exploded one hour too early killing three terrorists instead of the intended victims two bus-loads of people.

Time Change Riots
Patrons of bars that stay open past 2:00 a.m. lose one hour of drinking time on the day when Daylight Saving Time springs forward one hour. This has led to annual problems in numerous locations, and sometimes even to riots. For example, at a “time disturbance” in Athens, Ohio, site of Ohio University, over 1,000 students and other late night partiers chanted “Freedom,” as they threw liquor bottles at the police attempting to control the riot.

Radio Stations
AM radio signals propagate much further at night than during the day. During daytime, more stations in neighboring areas can broadcast on the same frequency without interfering with each other. Because of this situation, there are hundreds of stations licensed to operate only in the daytime. Daylight Saving Time can affect the bottom line of these daytime-only radio stations: during parts of the year it can cause the stations to lose their most profitable time of day–the morning drive time. The gain of an hour of daylight – and thus broadcast time – in the evening does not fully compensate for the morning loss.

Violent Crime
A study found that crime was consistently less during periods of Daylight Saving Time than during comparable standard time periods. Data showed violent crime down 10 to 13 percent. It is clear that for most crimes where darkness is a factor, such as muggings, there are many more incidents after dusk than before dawn, so light in the evening is most welcome.

Oil Conservation
Following the 1973 oil embargo, the U.S. Congress extended Daylight Saving Time to 8 months, rather than the normal six months. During that time, the U.S. Department of Transportation found that observing Daylight Saving Time in March and April saved the equivalent in energy of 10,000 barrels of oil each day – a total of 600,000 barrels in each of those two years.
Likewise, in 1986, Daylight Saving Time moved from the last Sunday in April to the first Sunday in April. No change was made to the ending date of the last Sunday in October. Adding the entire month of April to Daylight Saving Time is estimated to save the U.S. about 300,000 barrels of oil each year.
Beginning in 2007, Daylight Saving Time commenced on the second Sunday in March and ended on the first Sunday in November, thereby saving even more oil.

Births and Birthdays
While twins born at 11:55 p.m. and 12:05 a.m. may have different birthdays, Daylight Saving Time can change birth order — on paper, anyway. During the time change in the fall, one baby could be born at 1:55 a.m. and the sibling born ten minutes later, at 1:05 a.m. In the spring, there is a gap when no babies are born at all: from 2:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m.
In November 2007, Laura Cirioli of North Carolina gave birth to Peter at 1:32 a.m. and, 34 minutes later, to Allison. However, because Daylight Saving Time reverted to Standard Time at 2:00 a.m., Allison was born at 1:06 a.m.

 

* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *


The South African Meat Industry Company,
Samic has very nice meat cutting charts.
Just click on the banner below for lots of interesting information.



I must compliment whoever does the SAMIC newsletter for their lovely sayings! Have look, they are amazing!

 

Our Home Biltong Makers


Rockey’s new TURBO Home Biltong Maker!

And so the success story continues …..

The introduction of Rockey’s new TURBO Home Biltong Maker has taken the Biltong making world by storm.

We have just not been able to keep up!

Everytime a new batch arrives from the factory it has already been pre-sold.

The new Turbo model is basically Rockey’s New Age Biltong Maker with a fan added at the bottom. More slots were added for improved airflow and the whole unit looks AND works very smart! Great prices for you on our birthday!The big thing is that it keeps humidity out thus eliminating virtually all chances of mould and it dries the meat about twice as fast as with the convential method.

All in all a good investment for those people who make a lot of Biltong!

Of course we must not forget the standard RNA-5 model and the ever popular Biltong Buddy! Both are excellent machines, something to which thousands of satisfied customers will testify!

Special new features:

  • All our Home Biltong Makers are now fitted standard with a standard appliance approved power cable complete with a standard EU two-pin plug.
  • Grommets have been added to the cable entry point on the box.
  • A highly improved and stronger PST is now used for all boxes.



And so, once again, we have improved on previous models and have made it easier and quicker than ever before for you to make your Biltong.
Not convinced yet?
Just read about what people are saying (we only started keeping records in 2001) on our customers comments page.

The most popular Home Biltong Maker in the world!You too could be making your own Biltong in a very short space of time.
Have a look at our Home Biltong Makers and see how easy it is!!

Details on ROCKEY’S 5kg Home Biltong Maker as well as the new Turbo Model can be found by clicking on this link.

It's as easy as 1-2-3 to make your own Biltong!

You can have a look at the BILTONG BUDDY here.

This month’s specials


It’s a special birthday for us this year and we are the ones who are giving away the presents!Have a look at these prices!


This exquisite hand made biltong cutter makes a lovely gift!


Click here to go to our on-line shop.

[These special offers are for a limited period only, as long as present stocks last and can be changed without prior notice!]
Tips of the month


Some useful tips

Hang-over
Eat honey on crackers. The fructose in the honey will help to flush out the alcohol in your system.

Hay fever
Steep 1 teaspoon fenugreek seed in 1 cup water, covered, for 10 minutes. Drink 1 cup a day to help hay fever symptoms.

Headache Eat 10-12 almonds, the equivalent of two aspirins, for a migraine headache. Almonds are far less likely to upset the stomach.

Hiccups
Only 2 remedies have I ever known to actually work. The first listed makes the most sense, since a hiccup is simply a spasm of the diaphragm, and you need to disrupt this spasm. The second offers no rhyme or reason, but works nonetheless.

Breath in as deeply as you can, then exhale as hard as you can; repeat 10 times; when exhaling the last time, keep the air pushed out, not taking another breath for as long as you can stand. This normally works the first try, but repeat if necessary. Be sure to sit down when doing this.

This is a remedy only feasible when sitting at a bar. Have the bartender fill a small glass with club soda. Light a match and drop it, then drink the water quickly (being careful not to drink the match). It works, but I don’t know why! Drink 1/2 glass water, slowly.

Keep a tsp. of sugar in your mouth and suck slowly.
Suck 2-3 small pieces of fresh ginger.

Take a large mouthful of water with out swallowing, plug both ears, and slowly begin to swallow the water. Unplug your ears and you’re hiccup free! (Submitted by Mrs T. Falkmann)

Eat a heaped teaspoon of peanut butter all at once. (Submitted by Tracy Pletcher)

Hickey
Coat area liberally with lotion.
Rub with the back of a cold spoon vigorously for as long as you can stand to, changing the spoon for new cold one every 10 minutes.
Recommended time for this treatment is 45-60 minutes.

Why it works:
A hickey is a bruise; the discoloration of a bruise is caused by blood accumulating under the skin from broken capillaries; this remedy breaks up the old blood so it can be reabsorbed by the body more quickly, therefore diminishing the discoloration.

Rub white toothpaste over the hickey, allow to dry, and later, wipe it off with a warm face cloth. After a few applications, the hickey will be faded. Do not use gel toothpaste. (Submitted by Hot Rod Anne.)

Insect bites
Mix water with cornstarch into a paste and apply. This is effective in drawing out the poisons of most insect bites and is also an effective remedy for diaper rash.

 



Our spices are Kosher and Halaal!

It will certainly interest our Jewish readers that our biltong spices are certified as being kosher by the Beth Din of Johannesburg. Anyone interested can mail us for a copy of the certification. (new 2007 certification is now available)
Our Muslim readers can rest assured that all our spices are certified Halaal by the Muslim Judicial Council Halaal Trust. A copy of the 2007 certificate is available on request.

 



South African Meat Cutting Charts


Below you will find three excellent meat cutting charts.

These are displayed with the compliments of SAMIC.
(The South African Meat Industry Company).
SAMIC has a very interesting web site as well as a weekly newsletter about anything to do with the
Meat Industry in South Africa.
Now, don’t think this is a totally boring web site (I thought so first) but it has some very interesting articles and statistics.


Beef Cutting Chart
Pork Cutting Chart
Lamb Cutting Chart

* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *

Welcome to Apartment Oberholzer in Vienna, Austria


Winter or summer, our charming Viennese building will make you feel right at home. As our guests’ well-being is a matter close to our hearts, the quiet residence offers every convenience from a microwave, dishwasher and washing machine to Satellite TV.

The Vienna city center is within 10 minutes walking distance. Public transport is right at the Guest house.

Excellent value at an incredible price!

Our well-kept, 54 m² newly renovated non-smoking holiday flat is suitable for 1-4 people. It is central, quiet, charming and very reasonably priced.

For further information please see our website www.netland.at/wien/oberholzer

Questions and Answers


As in every newsletter, here is our regular section with some of the many questions we receive from our readers all over the world.
If we have not given an answer and you can help these people could you please mail them?
(Please copy us in on your mails @
info@biltongmakers.com
so we can help other people who might have the same questions in the future)


QUESTION

Can you help with a recipe for a Russian sausage please? – we live in Oz.
Kind regards

Leon van der Linde
Australia
leovdlinde@yahoo.com

 



QUESTION

What is Saltpeter in Biltong used for?

Answer

Saltpeter or Sodium Nitrate is a salt used to keep the red colour in the meat and as a preservative as well Most people don’t use it any more as too much could cause a problem. It has to be used in minute quantities.
Fred,
Australia

 



QUESTION

Does anyone have a Chicken Biltong recipe?

Answer

I use the same method for chicken as I do for beef, and it tastes nearly as good!
If you need a recipe I would recommend the one at:
http://www.biltongmakers.com/biltong13_recipes3_connoisseur.html

David Elvey
London. England

 



QUESTION

When meat is dried in a biltong cabinet by means of heat/warmth what temperature is it done at?
Are there any enzymes destroyed in the meat?

Answer

I have had this out with the local government in our country. There is no real temperature that is required. The heat from an ordinary bulb is enough to heat the meat required but air MUST circulate around the Meat.
The enzymes will stay intact because, like in cooking, the meat does not lose any of its goodness providing you use a good quality meat such as Silverside which I find best.

Andrew Grover
Bishop’s Waltham, England

 



FEEDBACK ON MOULD

We all have had to do with mould at some stage in our biltong making efforts. Here are a couple of feed backs from readers on how mould can be prevented.

What to do about mould

I believe the problem lies in the lack of circulation and/or a lack of heat. As another option you could add a little more salt but only as a last resort.

Andrew Grover
Bishop’s Waltham, England

 



I found using apple cider vinegar sprayed on the biltong (only if mould appears) normally kills the growth straight away.

Leon,
South Africa

 



I have been making biltong on a regular basis, and one of my first batches turned out mouldy, which was very distressing, coz I intended on selling it to friends… So I “washed” it with vinegar, and then left them to dry again and it seemed fine after wards.
But I realized that there were two factors that could contribute to mould forming.
Humidity and
An inadequate amounts of spices.

the spices help to preserve the meat and also help to dry it. Since i corrected these two problems, I have not had any problems.
Also beware that if you store the biltong (especially wet) in closed plastic containers they WILL go mouldy. So it is better to freeze them or keep them in paper bags. Don’t freeze in paper bags because the biltong will dry out. Only freeze in plastic bags.

Brain Ridley
United Arab Emirates

 

Stoep Talk
In this case, a dog’s life wouldn’t be so bad …
By James Clarke
Our stoepWhen, not long ago, New York billionaire Leona Helmsley died, she left the equivalent of R85-million to her Maltese terrier.
Trouble.

Now I happen to know Maltese terriers because, by default, I became custodian to two of them in succession – both now deceased.

They are useless little animals, strictly designed for women.
Well, not entirely useless because a pair of them, once they’re dead, can make a fine pair of warm slippers and can even be used as a woolly cloth to shine the car.

But how would my attitude change if I were introduced to Trouble, who, after all, has done far better in life than me (or even I. Or maybe both of us)?

More important, as a more successful animal, what would Trouble’s reaction be to me? He would probably rush up and pee against my leg.
I’d try to impress him by telling him a little lie – that I was personally acquainted with the German shepherd, Gunther IV, who is currently the richest animal on earth. He is worth R1,2-billion.

The London Daily Telegraph reports that Gunther inherited the money from his dad, Gunther III. His dad died in 1992 after being left R400-million by his owner, Countess Karlotta Libenstein.

I am always polite to German shepherds anyway – even poor ones. I make a point of being polite to anything with bigger teeth than me. And being the epitome of a middle-class person, I am especially respectful to anybody whose income makes mine look ridiculous.

Apparently there’s a chimpanzee in Cape Town named Kalu who was rescued from a tree by Patricia O’Neill. Patricia, in her will, has left her Cape Town estate to Kalu.

It’s difficult to know how the chimp will treat the estate.

What would happen if Kalu didn’t pay the electricity bills – after all he won’t need electricity because chimps, being strictly diurnal, never read at night and are not terribly keen on cooking or using power tools.

Would Eskom sue? And how would the chimp defend himself in court? I suppose by biting the prosecutor and witnesses who displeased him.

The same might apply to canine defendants.

Not long ago a New York poodle inherited around R220-million, which is quite serious money for a dog who needs little more than dog biscuits and an occasional change of collar.

And who administers these inheritances? Apparently trustees who are sometimes related – related to the deceased, not to the animal.

“Hi Fred, who’d you work for these days?”

“Got a real nice job, working for a Dalmatian. He’s a multi-multi millionaire.”

“Really? I knew a Dalmatian once – Guzitsa Valdivastiniskozich. Nice guy. Dalmatia’s on the Croatian coast y’know? What are they like to work for?”

“This one’s okay. He whines a bit if I don’t take him for a walk. Sometimes he pees in my kitchen and he goes around sniffing dogs’ behinds. That sort of thing.”

“You’re kidding! Mind you, if you’re a multi millionaire you can be as eccentric as you like I suppose. Is he old?”

“About 11 I think.”

“Fred? Are you okay? You don’t need some sort of help do you?”

“I’m fine – just have to get back to give the blighter his new flea collar.”

“See you around Fred. Must hurry.”

GOING CUCKOO

Last Wednesday Ros Mitchell in Bryanston heard this year’s first Piet-my-vrou cuckoo.

A day later, Robert Couperthwaite, on the family’s farm in the Magaliesberg near Nooitgedacht, heard a single call before the rain fell.

Oddly enough, his sister, Joan D’Arcy of Ruimsig, now living in Singapore, regularly heard the first cuckoo of the season.

Recipe Corner


The Great South African Koeksuster

So many readers have been asking again and again for a good Koeksuster recipe. Well, Annie Sieber from Crown National in Johannesburg obliged. Annie reckons this is the best and easiest Koeksuster recipe ever.

Here we go ….

Annie’s Koeksusters

The Syrup
Make the syrup the day before and chill thoroughly in the refrigerator.

What to get
Please note: 1 ml is 0.42 gram or around 1/2 gram

  • 750 ml sugar
  • 625 ml water
  • 2 ml cream of tartar
  • 1 cinnamon stick

What to do

  • Dissolve sugar in water over low heat
  • Add the cream of tartar and the cinnamon stick
  • Boil this for 10 minutes and then set aside to cool
  • Refrigerate overnight

Annie’s cooking tip
When using the syrup, I usually stand the bowl in a larger bowl of ice cubes to maintain the chill. It is very important that the syrup is ice cold and stays that way while using it.
Some people I know even make 2 bowls of syrup. As the one bowl gets hot from the hot koeksusters, they place the bowl in the deep freezer, then alternate the 2 bowls.

The Dough

Your shopping list

  • 500 g flour, sifted
  • 2 ml salt
  • 5 ml ground cinnamon
  • 2 ml ground ginger
  • 10 ml instant dry yeast
  • 75 ml sugar
  • 50 ml melted butter
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • About 250 ml lukewarm water
  • Oil for deep frying

How to go about it

  • Place the sifted flour in mixing bowl, add salt and spices and mix well
  • Add the yeast and the sugar and then the melted butter and the egg
  • Add enough water to form a soft dough
  • Knead until smooth and elastic
  • Place in lightly greased bowl, cover and leave in warm place to rise until doubled in bulk – about 40 minutes.
  • Roll out dough to 6 mm thick on a lightly floured surface
  • Cut into rectangles 40mm x 70mm
  • Divide each rectangle into 3 strips, leaving about 10mm from one end uncut.
  • Plait dough loosely and secure the ends
  • Leave in warm place to rise (about 10 to 15 minutes).
  • Deep fry in hot oil until cooked and golden brown, then plunge into cold syrup
  • Leave a while to absorb the syrup, then remove and place koeksusters on a draining rack so excess syrup can drip off.

This recipe makes about 36 koeksusters.

Enjoy it!

Annie Sieber
Johannesburg, South Africa

 



Click below for our handy cooking converter
Our handy cooking converter
Bits and pieces from South Africa


Escom pulls the plug on Jokes …
By Barry Bateman

If Eskom could generate a watt for every laugh at its expense it would solve the energy crisis and sell surplus power to meet China’s demand.

South Africans can’t be accused of having no sense of humour if the “Eishkom” e-mails and cartoons are anything to go by: Do you know what the difference is between South Africa and the Titanic? The Titanic went down with its lights on.

Madam & Eve have had a dig at the power utility as has Zapiro, while Nandos has started a new print campaign.

“Eish kom nou,” the ad reads with a picture of a bottle of Nandos peri-peri sauce with a candle burning on its lid. “When the lights go out you can still enjoy a saucy night in.”

But Escom managers don’t share the same funny bone.

An e-mail sent to employees states: “In terms of the Escom Information Security Policy users shall not use any electronic communication facilities provided by Escom to create, send, forward, store or display material that is fraudulent, sexually explicit, obscene, defamatory, racially or sexually harassing, threatening, unlawful, contrary to the rules of Escom, the regulations of the appropriate Escom ethics body or otherwise illegal.

“This is a request for Escom employees that receive these jokes to forward them to group communications and under no circumstances should these jokes be circulated,” it read.

 


Put Cape Town on Monopoly map

 

Cape Town stands a chance of being placed on the map, or board, as one of the 22 greatest cities in a world version of property board game Monopoly.

Monopoly has initiated a competition to find the greatest cities in the world, which will replace the street name’s on the game’s conventional version.

Fans from across the globe can cast their votes online and be part of creating the first worldwide Monopoly.

Having received 0,9 percent of the votes so far, Cape Town is currently in 27th place.

Potential voters can vote for 10 great cities daily, while the 20 cities with the most votes will be selected to be placed on the World Edition game board.

The city with the highest votes will be placed as the highest rent property.

Amsterdam, London, Cape Town, Cairo and Buenos Aires are among the cities up for votes, while additional space will be reserved for two cities nominated through a wild card vote.

The wild card vote is open to any city.

Voting opened this week and closes on February 28.

Voting can be cast through the SA Goodnews website www.monopolyworldvote.com

 

 



Cry, the beloved country …
November 2007

Why I am fleeing South Africa
by Anne Paton (widow of Alan Paton)

I am leaving South Africa . I have lived here for 35 years, and I shall leave with anguish. My home and my friends are here, but I am terrified.

I know I shall be in trouble for saying so, because I am the widow of Alan Paton.
Fifty years ago he wrote Cry, The Beloved Country. He was an unknown schoolmaster and it was his first book, but it became a bestseller overnight. It was eventually translated into more than 20 languages and became a set book in schools all over the world. It has sold more than 15 million copies and still sells 100,000 copies a year.

As a result of the startling success of this book, my husband became famous for his impassioned speeches and writings, which brought to the notice of the world the suffering of the black man under apartheid.

He campaigned for Nelson Mandela’s release from prison and he worked all his life for black majority rule. He was incredibly hopeful about the new South Africa that would follow the end of apartheid, but he died in 1988, aged 85.
I was so sorry he did not witness the euphoria and love at the time of the election in 1994. But I am glad he is not alive now. He would have been so distressed to see what has happened to his beloved country.

I love this country with a passion, but I cannot live here any more. I can no longer live slung about with panic buttons and gear locks.

I am tired of driving with my car windows closed and the doors locked, tired of being afraid of stopping at red lights. I am tired of being constantly on the alert, having that sudden frisson of fear at the sight of a shadow by the gate, of a group of youths approaching – although nine times out of 10 they are innocent of harmful intent.
Such is the suspicion that dogs us all.

Among my friends and the friends of my friends, I know of nine people who have been murdered in the past four years. An old friend, an elderly lady, was raped and murdered by someone who broke into her home for no reason at all; another was shot at a garage.

We have a saying, “Don’t fire the gardener”, because of the belief that it is so often an inside job – the gardener who comes back and does you in.

All this may sound like paranoia, but it is not without reason. I have been hijacked, mugged and terrorised.
A few years ago my car was taken from me at gunpoint. I was forced into the passenger seat.
I sat there frozen. But just as one man jumped into the back and the other fumbled with the starter I opened the door and ran away.
To this day I do not know how I did this. But I got away, still clutching my handbag.

On May 1 last year I was mugged in my home at three in the afternoon. I used to live in a community of big houses with big grounds in the countryside.
It’s still beautiful and green, but the big houses have been knocked down and people have moved into fenced complexes like the one in which I now live. Mine is in the suburbs of Durban , but they’re springing up everywhere.

That afternoon I came home and omitted to close the security door. I went upstairs to lie down. After a while I thought I’d heard a noise, perhaps a bird or something.
Without a qualm I got up and went to the landing; outside was a man. I screamed and two other men appeared. I was seized by the throat and almost throttled; I could feel myself losing consciousness.
My mouth was bound with Sellotape and I was threatened with my own knife (Girl Guide issue from long ago) and told: “If you make a sound, you die.” My hands were tied tightly behind my back and I was thrown into the guest room and the door was shut.
They took all the electronic equipment they could find, except the computer. They also, of course, took the car.

A few weeks later my new car was locked up in my fenced carport when I was woken by its alarm in the early hours of the morning. The thieves had removed the radio, having cut through the padlocks in order to bypass the electric control on the gates.

The last straw came a a while later, shortly before my 71st birthday.
I returned home in the middle of the afternoon and walked into my sitting room. Outside the window two men were breaking in. I retreated to the hall and pressed the panic alarm. This time I had shut the front door on entering. By now I had become more cautious. Yet one of the men ran around the house, jumped over the fence and tried to batter down the front door.
Meanwhile, his accomplice was breaking my sitting- room window with a hammer. This took place while the sirens were shrieking, which was the frightening part.
They kept coming, in broad daylight, while the alarm was going. They knew that there had to be a time lag of a few minutes before help arrived – enough time to dash off with the television and video recorder.
In fact, the front-door assailant was caught and taken off to the cells.

Recently I telephoned to ask the magistrate when I would be called as a witness. She told me she had let him off for lack of evidence.
She said that banging on my door was not an offence, and how could I prove that his intent was hostile?

I have been careless in the past – razor wire and electric gates give one a feeling of security. Or at least, they did. But I am careless no longer.
No fence – be it electric or not – no wall, no razor wire is really a deterrent to the determined intruder. Now my alarm is on all the time and my panic button hung round my neck.
While some people say I have been unlucky, others say: “You are lucky not to have been raped or murdered.” What kind of a society is this where one is considered “lucky” not to have been raped or murdered – yet?

A character in Cry, The Beloved Country says: “I have one great fear in my heart, that one day when they are turned to loving they will find we are turned to hating.” And so it has come to pass. There is now more racial tension in this country than I have ever known.

But it is not just about black-on-white crime. It is about general lawlessness. Black people suffer more than the whites. They do not have access to private security firms, and there are no police stations near them in the townships and rural areas. They are the victims of most of the hijackings, rapes and murders. They cannot run away like the whites, who are streaming out of this country in their thousands.

President Mandela has referred to us who leave as “cowards” and says the country can do without us.
So be it.
But it takes a great deal of courage to uproot and start again. We are leaving because crime is rampaging through the land. The evils that beset this country now are blamed on the legacy of apartheid.
One of the worst legacies of that time is that of the Bantu Education Act, which deliberately gave black people an inferior education.

The situation is exacerbated by the fact that criminals know that their chances of being caught are negligible; and if they are caught they will be free almost at once. So what is the answer
? The government needs to get its priorities right. We need a powerful, well-trained and well-equipped police force.

Recently there was a robbery at a shopping centre in the afternoon. A call to the police station elicited the reply: “We have no transport.” “Just walk then,” said the caller; the police station is about a two-minute sprint from the shop in question. “We have no transport,” came the reply again.
Nobody arrived.

There is a quote from my husband’s book: “Cry, the beloved country, for the unborn child that is the inheritor of our fear.
Let him not love the earth too deeply. Let him not laugh too gladly when the water runs through his fingers, nor stand too silent when the setting sun makes red the veld with fire. Let him not be too moved when the birds of his land are singing, nor give too much of his heart to a mountain or a valley.
For fear will rob him of all if he gives too much.”

What has changed in half a century? A lot of people who were convinced that everything would be all right are disillusioned, though they don’t want to admit it.

The government has many excellent schemes for improving the lot of the black man, who has been disadvantaged for so long. A great deal of money is spent in this direction. However, nothing can succeed while people live in such fear.
Last week, about 10km from my home, an old couple were taken out and murdered in the garden. The wife had only one leg and was in a wheelchair.
Yet they were stabbed and strangled – for very little money. They were the second old couple to be killed last week. It goes on and on, all the time; we have become a killing society.

As I prepare to return to England , a young man asked me the other day, in all innocence, if things were more peaceful there.
“You see,” he said, “I know of no other way of life than this. I cannot imagine anything different.”
What a tragic statement on the beloved country today.

“Because the white man has power, we too want power,” says Msimangu. “But when a black man gets power, when he gets money, he is a great man if he is not corrupted. I have seen it often. He seeks power and money to put right what is wrong, and when he gets them, why, he enjoys the power and the money.
Now he can gratify his lusts, now he can arrange ways to get white man’s liquor.
I see only one hope for our country, and that is when white men and black men, desiring neither power nor money, but desiring only the good of their country, come together to work for it.

I have one great fear in my heart, that one day when they are turned to loving, they will find we are turned to hating.

 


Crime News Update
April 2008

Some of our readers have asked us why they must read about blood and gore and all the bad things happening in South Africa in-between our lovely recipes and other nice stories.

We agree.

We all know how bad it is in our beloved country and that it is going from bad to worse. But, why should we be reminded about that in a newsletter that is trying to give some cheer.
So, from now on we will no longer have a crime update in our newsletter. We see and hear enough about it anyway.

Around the World


Bits and Bobs from people around the world

The British Solution to Save Petrol

Brown wants us to cut the amount of petrol we use……

I have a great idea. Let’s do the following:

  • Deport the three odd million illegal immigrants that live in our country. Less people equals less petrol used.
  • Bring our troops home from Iraq to guard the Channel.
  • When they catch an illegal immigrant crossing the Channel, hand him a canteen, rifle and some ammo and ship him to Iraq or Afghanistan.
  • Tell him if he wants to come to Britain then he must serve a tour in the military.
  • Give him a soldier’s pay while he’s there and tax him on it.
  • After his tour, he will be allowed to become a citizen since he defended this country.
  • He will also be registered to be taxed and be a legal resident.

This option will probably deter illegal immigration and provide a solution for the troops in Iraq and the aliens trying to make a better life for themselves.
If they refuse to serve, ship them to Iraq or Afghanistan anyway, without the canteen, rifle or ammo.

Problem solved!

 



SA to lose its UK visa-free status

The United Kingdom is “likely” to strip SA of its “visa-free” status this year because of rampant corruption in the Department of Home Affairs, the Sunday Times reported.

South Africans would have to pay £ 63.00 (nearly R 1000) and provide fingerprints, “facial biometrics” and travel documents to obtain visas, the newspaper said. More than 250 000 tourists, business people and family visitors to Britain would have to apply for visas each year.

“The door is being shut because corrupt Home Affairs officials have been dishing out genuine passports to people smugglers, foreign asylum seekers and — allegedly — suspected terrorists wanting to enter Britain”, the report said.

As a result, British immigration experts said, the South African passport was “no longer worth the paper it’s written on”.

South Africa leapt to the top of the British government’s visa “hit list” last month following a British trial that heard that at least 6000 illegal Asian immigrants had been smuggled into Britain on South African passports.
Last week Sir Stephen Lander, chairperson of Britain’s Serious Organised Crime Agency, told Britain’s Home Affairs Committee that the case “is likely” to lead to visa controls being placed on all South Africans, the Sunday Times said.

British immigration authorities are currently subjecting South Africa, with other countries, to a “Visa Waiver Test”, expected to end this year. Experts said South Africa was almost certain to fail on three of the six key criteria due to crime and Home Affairs corruption.

On Friday, the British Home Office insisted a decision had not been made but admitted that the issues raised by a recent police operation “will be of concern to both governments”.

Cleo Mosana, spokesperson for Home Affairs Minister Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula, acknowledged on Friday that there were “major issues about the integrity and credibility” of South African passports, the Sunday Times said. She said South Africa had met Britain to discuss the review. South Africa was attempting to deal with the passport corruption.

Something to smile about


This month just a couple of the “shorties” that keep on flowing in daily

Die Boer en die Prokureur

‘n Boer, Piet, was in ‘n motor ongeluk.

In die hof, is die vervoermaatskappy se hot shot prokureur besig om hom te ondervra.

Het jy, op die ongelukstoneel, gesê: “Ek’s orraait!” vra die prokureur.
Piet: Wel, kom ek vertel jou wat gebeur het. Ek het net my gunsteling koei, Bessie, op die sleepwa gelaai en…
Die prokureur val hom in die rede: “Ek vra nie vir detail nie, antwoord net die vraag. Het jy, op die ongelukstoneel gesê: “Ek’s orraait!” Ja of nee?
Piet: Wel, ek het net vir Bessie op die sleepwa gehad en ek was skaars op die pad…
Die prokureur val hom weer in die rede en sê aan die regter: Edelagbare, ek probeer net die feit vasstel, dat hierdie man, by die ongelukstoneel, aan die verkeersman gesê het dat hy oraait is. Nou probeer hy my kliënt dagvaar. Ek glo vas hy is ‘n bedrieër. Sê asb vir hom hy moet net die vraag beantwoord.

Teen hierdie tyd is die regter al redelik geintresseerd in Piet se storie oor Bessie, en sê vir die prokureur: “Ek wil graag sy storie oor die koei hoor”.

Ou Piet bedank die regter en gaan voort met sy storie.

“Wel, soos ek gesê het, ek het net vir Bessie op die sleepwa gelaai en was op die pad toe daar skielik ‘n moerse trok van die kant af kom, ‘n stop straat skip en my bakkie en sleepwa in hulle moer in ry.
Ek is eenkant toe gegooi in ‘n sloot en Bessie anderkant toe in ‘n ander sloot. Ek was seer, nogals erg seer en wou nie beweeg nie.

In elk geval, ek het toe vir Bessie gehoor kerm en ek het geweet sy is in erge pyn, net deur te luister na haar kreune. Nou, net na die ongeluk, kom daar n spietkop op die toneel aan en hy het ook Bessie se gekerm gehoor, so hy het toe nader aan haar gegaan.
Nadat hy na haar gekyk het en die toestand gesien het waarin sy was, het hy sy pistool uitgetrek en haar tussen die oë geskiet.”

“Toe kom die spietkop oor die pad na my kant toe, sy pistool nogsteeds in sy hand, en hy vra: Hoe voel jy?”

“Nou vertel vir my, meneer prokureur, wat de F…. sou jy vir hom gesê het?”

 



Holy Cow!

Van der Merwe jokes are not dead – they’ve merely been hibernating…

Every Friday evening after work Van der Merwe would braai a big, fat juicy steak.
But his neighbours, being Catholic and therefore reluctant to eat meat on Fridays suffered agonies of temptation as the delicious aroma carried on the evening breeze.

They persuaded their priest to try to convert Van.
Success!
Van attended Mass and the priest sprinkled holy water over him and said, “You were born a Protestant, raised a Protestant but now you are a Catholic.”

Everybody was delighted. But when Friday night came the wonderful aroma of grilled steak again wafted over the neighbourhood.

The priest rushed into Van’s garden just in time to see him clutching a small bottle of holy water and sprinkling it over the grilling meat and chanting, “You was born a cow, you was raised as a cow, but now you’s a kabeljou!”



So, so true ....


Exercise for over 40’s (or those nearing it…)

Just came across this exercise suggested for the over 40’s to build muscle strength in the arms and shoulders. It seems so easy so I thought that I’d pass it on to some of my friends and family. The article suggested doing it three days a week.

Begin by standing on a comfortable surface, where you have plenty of room at each side. With a 2kg potato bag in each hand, extend your arms straight out from your sides and hold them there as long as you can. Try to reach a full minute, then relax.

Each day, you’ll find that you can hold this position for just a bit longer. After a couple of weeks, move up to 5kg potato bag. Then 25kg potato bag and then eventually try to get to where you can lift a 50kg potato bag in each hand and hold your arms straight for more than a full minute (I’m at this level).

After you feel confident at that level, put a potato in each of the bags.

 



And lastly, just before going to sleep……

Lekker slaap om die wêreld/Goodnight around the world:
Holland: Goeden nacht
Australia: Night Mate
America: Goodnite
Germany: Schlafen sie wohl

South Africa: Is die deure gesluit, die vensters toegemaak
,die kar ingetrek en die alarm geaktiveer?
Is die Rotweilers gebêre en veilig?
Lekker slaap, moenie worry nie, Eskom sal die ligte afsit!

Sport talk


Snippets from the papers

‘2010 won’t be canceled’
The sports ministry has reportedly put R260-million on the line to make sure electricity blackouts do not threaten the staging of the 2010 Football World Cup.
Full Story …

Local lads will have inside edge
While the door is not closed on overseas-based players to get into the Springbok team, it is a lot more open for those players who’ll be involved in this year’s Super 14 competition.
Full Story …

Polly a truly class act
Former South African coach Shaun Pollock has been a faithful servant of South African cricket for well over a decade. Graeme Ford pays tribute to Polly.
Full Story …

SA’s 2010 organisers take on critics, cynics
South Africa’s soccer World Cup organising committee and officials, are being assailed on all fronts by political uncertainties, crime and power cuts.
Full Story …

Let’s hear from you too!!


Come on, let’s hear from you too!!

Our regular readers (like Annie and her comrades at Crown National) may have noticed that I have gone from a monthly issue to a bi-monthly one and even worse! The reason is simple. It is impossible to do a newsletter of this size on my own. I am an editor and rely on you the readers for input!

You are probably sitting at the computer right now so how about it. Let our readers enjoy your story!
It does not have to be about Biltong or such. We’d love to hear where you live and how you have adapted yourself to your new life style and surroundings.

You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask?
Perhaps you have some advice to give?

You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Share it with other people around the world!

Click right here to start now or you can mail us at webmaster@biltongmakers.com

Boerewors for Europe and the UK


Boerewors (Europe and UK only, sorry people!)

It’s almost Spring and now is the time for you guys in Europe and the UK to start stocking up for that first warm day when you haul out the braai for the first time this year!
We are making fresh weekly batches of around 150kg at the moment but our boerewors is still disappearing faster than we can make it, especially via our internet site!
But, we normally have enough fresh stock available most of the time.
What is better than real South African boerewors on a braai?To place an order just click on the picture or on www.boerewors.be and fill out the order form. You can either collect or we can mail it to you.

All our customers in Holland, Belgium and in fact, all over Europe are raving about the packing of and the condition in which the wors arrived at their doorsteps.

Just imagine some “lekker” pap and wors with a nice tomato and onion sauce!

Complete the order form you will find by going to www.boerewors.be or give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25.

Our Boerewors is vacuum packed in quantities of about 500 gram.
The normal price is € 8.45 per kg but for the time being we will keep it at only € 8.45 € 7.95 per kg!!

You can also place your order by simply clicking here.

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Droëwors around the world


Droëwors …… a typical South African delicacy all of its own!

Droëwors, as it is known in South Africa, is as much part of the country’s culinary culture as Biltong, Pap, Boerewors and Potjiekos.
100 grams of pure South AfricaThe spices are of course imported especially from South Africa so you will get the “real” thing!

Fresh droëwors is available right now and we normally have ample stock.

The price is € 40.00 € 30.00 per kilogram vacuum pack or € 4.50 € 4.00 per 100 gram packet.

Droëwors (like biltong) travels well and posting is an ideal option.
We can mail it to you anywhere in the world via priority mail in minimum quantities of 500 gram.
You can place your order now by going to www.boerewors.be, give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.

 



Now also available at

DE WIJN KRAAL
The South African Wine Specialist Store in Leuven, Belgium.
Telephone 016 58.46.06


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Biltong for all our readers!


Biltong …… once hooked you’re a slave forever!

Biltong is without doubt the snack most associated with South Africa!
It is so much part of South African culture that there is no food related shop that will not stock it. You find it literally anywhere.
Say Biltong and you say South Africa!

Biltongmakers.Com has for more than 12 years supplied their Home Biltong Makers to the South African expat so they could make their own biltong away from home.

Freshly sliced biltong!We were often asked why we don’t make Biltong ourselves and then make it available to the poor and deprived ex-South Africans!
The requests have been relentless and constant so we decided to give it a go on a temporary basis. Just to see how well it would sell.

So, from now on you will be able to get your biltong directly from us.
The spices are of course imported from South Africa so you will get the “real” taste like “back home”!

The price is Euro 40.00 per 1kg vacuum pack or Euro 5.00 per 100 gram packet.

Biltong travels well and posting is an ideal option.
We can mail it to you anywhere in the world via priority mail.

To place your order please go to www.biltongmakers.be and click on one of the order form links. You can also call us on +32 (16) 53.96.25

We will get right back to you with how much the postage will be.

 

(For outside the EU we must mention that we are not responsible for packets confiscated by customs in your country.


Now also available at

DE WIJN KRAAL
The South African Wine Specialist Store in Leuven, Belgium.
Telephone 016 58.46.06


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Lamb on the Spit


Lamb on the Spit ……. something special!

Well, some people are verrrrrrrrrry quick of the mark! And no wonder because they know what it is like to have a party or function with a lamb on the spit!
Coming May and June are virtually booked full so, if you want to be part of the fun and really impress your friends, colleagues or other acquaintances, book now!

Lamb on the Spit is a way of entertaining as only known by very few mainly because it is thought to be very expensive ……. Not so!

Click to see me big!We will do a lamb on the Spit for parties of between 30 and 50 people for just € 18.00 and € 15.00 a head respectively.

Together with the lamb we will treat you to a big pot of curried potatoes, a tomato/salsa salad as well as a choice between a pasta salad or three-bean salad. Garlic or bread rolls are included as well.
For venues more than 50 km from our home base in Keerbergen there is a small transport fee.

Start planning now for those special occasions! Just keep in mind that quite a number of dates up to September are already booked! In fact, there are only three dates left between May and the end of July. June is fully booked.
Remember that we are doing these functions only during weekends.

 

Booking early is essential and you can do so on
+32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.

(A Lamb on the Spit can only be done outside because we cook on coals!)
Subscribing and Unsubscribing

Perhaps you would like to subscribe to this newsletter or tell a friend about Biltongmakers.Com! and the incredible Biltong Makers!! You can be included in this newsletter by clicking on the following link.
Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!
If you prefer not to receive email from us, you can unsubscribe from Biltongmakers.Com! by clicking on this link.
Unsubscribe me please.

November 2007

 

The home of Biltong, Boerewors, Potjiekos and much, much more!

The Biltongmakers.Com Newsletter November/December 2007

You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
If you do not wish to receive this newsletter you may unsubscribe at the bottom where you will find an automatic email link. Just click on that and send. Your name will then be permanently deleted from our database.

If you, your family or your friends want to subscribe to the newsletter please click on this link.

Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

In this Newsletter top
From the editor top


DISCLAIMER

The information and contributions contained in this newsletter are received from various readers local and international. Views and opinions reflected in our newsletter are not necessarily those of Biltongmakers.Com and its team members.

Keerbergen
Belgium

The “Aegean Jet” was skimming the waters at a fast pace. The spray of the wake thrown up by the catamaran’s twin turbo diesel engines sometimes shooting as high as 10 feet into the air.

The sky was deep blue and the breeze coming from the Aegean sea cooling on the skin.

We got up at 5.30 to be at the harbour on time to catch the boat.

The trip to Rhodes was relaxing. A lovely boat with airplane-like seating and a speed to almost match it! I stood outside at the bow for most of the 50 minute trip.

We arrived in the little harbour of Rhodes at around 10.30 and were soon through customs.

Outside taxi drivers were vying for our custom. They were all offering an hour long guided tour around the town. We haggled a bit (even June is getting quite good at it!) and were soon shown the most important sights around the small town. I did not know that this is the best preserved and fully operational medieval village in the world. Complete with walls and the original houses and buildings.
Of course the houses are now mostly occupied by tourist shops. A bit of a pity.

The trip to Rhodes Island in Greece was one of the things we promised ourselves during our trip to Turkey.

Just days before …..

We were coming from the theater and were walking down Curetes street. The afternoon sun was beating down on my capless bald patch and we were hot.

Walking down towards the library on the square at the end of the road, we passed the Memmius Monument and Domitian Place and we were talking amongst ourselves how incredible well this whole town was kept.

Just past the public lavatories on the right, were the terraced houses of the rich and famous and just ahead of us was Hadrian’s temple.

We were in Ephesus the ancient town in western Turkey.

Ephesus was first heard of over 4000 years ago but the town we walked through was from the Roman time – around 30-100 AD.

I always wanted to see Ephesus because it has such an incredible history. Not only biblical but long before that as well.

We arrived there on Sunday afternoon after a harrowing journey during which June found out that our driver of our small 16 seater bus was dozing off behind the wheel. Needless to say he was fired with full support of all. A new driver was installed and although he was wide awake and did not fall asleep behind the wheel he only knew one speed up and down the mountain passes. And his hooter of course!

Even I was worried – which says a lot!!

But let me start at the beginning ….

We were on holiday in Turkey. We stayed in a little village called Icmeler, a lovely small place on a beautiful bay.

We needed to get some sun in and on our bodies and this was the place to do it.

It was quiet. The tourists had mostly left with only a few remaining. It was the middle of October and soon most holiday places would close down completely not to open again till next April.

One of the things, apart from lazing by the pool or on the tiny beach was a trip to Ephesus and Hierapolis with its beautiful terraced baths.

It turned out to be the highlight of our holiday.

I cannot even start to explain how incredible well preserved Ephesus is. And till today only 30% has been unearthed! I also cannot even start to talk about the history of the town. Artimus was their goddess and both the apostles John and Paul spent time there.

Just little away from the town is the house where Mary spent the last days of her life

To put it in a nutshell, if that is at all possible, you cannot possibly do all of this in one day . There are so many buildings to see and read up on. From the library built by Celsus (see top left, that’s our little group in the front), the Grand Theater that could seat 25000 people, the terrace houses of the rich to the plague of Nike, the goddess of victory.

Can you see where Nike took their emblem from?

We left walking down harbour street with in the distance the prison [where Paul was held for three years] looking down on us from it’s mountain perch. From there we went to Hierapolis but I cannot go in to that as well unfortunately. I would need another 10 pages!

If you are interested in this type of history please click on the link for Ephesus and Hierapolis. Enjoy it!

For the rest it was a sun break.. We soaked up the sun, para-sailed, went on a trip to Rhodes Island in Greece and visited the small little markets in Icmeler and Marmaris.

We needed the break!

The last Saturday we watched South Africa win the Worldcup sitting in a small road side restaurant. We were the only South Africans amongst the dozens of England supporters!

I felt good when we won. We cheered every move, English or Bokke. Do you think for one moment that even one of the UK supporters would cheer a good move by us?

No Sirree!

Well, winter has really hit us early. When June went to work early this morning (at 6.30) it was -4C!

When I got myself out of bed eventually and looked out of the upstairs windows, all I could see was white frost. Brrrrrr!

Sitting here looking out of the study window it looks nice and sunny but believe me, there is a bite in the air.

The gardener came this morning to clear up some of the leaves. He is standing outside right now with the leave blower. Poor chap.

I feel sorry for him. But, he needs the work.

I think he is Albanian and does not speak a word of anything that I speak so communication is by means of showing him what to do and how to do it and through a complicated system of hand signals we have developed between the two of us!

His name is Ashok and he is the husband of our “poetsvrouw” or cleaning lady (that’s what they call them here).

I can’t believe that there are just 24 days to go before it is Christmas again. June and I have decided to stay home this year.
She cannot get off this December and has to work straight through.
Even boxing day is not a holiday in Belgium! Slave drivers!

But, last year was her turn when she took three weeks off to go to Singapore. Now it’s one of her colleagues!
No problem though. I cannot remember when we were on our own for Christmas!

One last little story

At the end of October it was little Caitlyn’s birthday. We went to Den Haag to be at her little party. She turned four. Towards the end of the afternoon she was quietly dressing her playmate.

One of the presents she got was a little box of a kind of rhinestone stickers. The kind that you can stick on paper or your dolly or yourself for that matter.

Very carefully she put another star on its back and then a couple of coloured buttons It crawled slowly across the table having to carry this extra load seemed a bit difficult.

The little eyes on their stalks turning around to see what is was on its back.

Eventually she was told to go and put it back in the garden which she dutifully did, complete with adornments.

Soon afterward we heard a splat and a crunch. Tony had gone outside for a smoke ……..

At least it went looking beautiful!

Well, that leaves me to say cheers. If you don’t hear from me before the time please have a lovely time over Christmas with your friends and family and may the New Year bring some peace and quiet in this world for a change.

We all need that!

Lo

Where there is hope,there is light.
Where there is faith,there is an end in sight.
where there is a will, there is a way.
Where there is love, there is the strength to brave the day.
God bless!

Stand still for a moment… top


What shall I give for Christmas?

A listening ear to the friend with a heartache.
A thank you to the tired salesperson who serves you.
Laughter to brighten a less-fortunate’s life.
A kiss and a hug for a handicapped child.
Time to read to the sightless.
An act of kindness to the shut-in.
A cheery greeting to one who is ill.
A smile to the elderly person who is struggling to walk.
A written message to a lonely one.
How simple our Christmas shopping can be this year –
And every year – when we give gifts of the heart.
Story of the month top

Flanders’ Poppies

Ever Ask the Question………

What have Red Poppies have to do with Veterans Day?

For many years I have found myself asking what the significance of the red poppies were in relation to Veterans or Armistice Day.
This year that question was asked of me and I had no answer.

I just had to find out the story behind the symbol and what a lot of interesting information I found!

Here it is, put together as well as I could from all kinds of bits and pieces I read …..

Throughout history is has been noted that after most major wars poppies popped up in the battlefields and on soldiers graves.

It seems that poppy seeds can lay dormant in the soil but when the soil is heavily turned or dug up they start to grow!

The most detailed of this event took place in World War One in Flanders, Belgium. In the craters where bombs fell and on the mounds of rubble, poppies bloomed everywhere.

The heavily churned earth and the high concentration of lime from the limestone buildings made the perfect catalyst for the poppies to grow.

Near Ypres (Ieper), where the fighting was at it’s fiercest, the soldiers were greeted by an amazing sight as they ventured out of the trenches in early Spring.
The fields were covered with a carpet of red as the local Flanders Poppy flourished in the recently bomb-tilled soil.

This, and perhaps the death of his close friend, Lieutenant Alexis Helme, in the second week of fighting during the Second Battle of Ypres (Ieper), was the inspiration for Canadian artillery officer and military doctor, Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, to pen his now famous poem on a scrap piece of paper on May 2nd, 1915: –

McCrae’s “In Flanders Fields” remains to this day one of the most memorable war poems ever written. It is a lasting legacy of the terrible battle in the Ypres (Ieper) salient in the spring of 1915.

“The poem was very nearly not published. Dissatisfied with it, McCrae tossed the poem away, but a fellow officer retrieved it and sent it to newspapers in England.

The Spectator, in London, rejected it, but Punch published it on December 8th, 1915, where it was seen as an invitation for recruits.

In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep,
though poppies grow
In Flanders fields

John McRae’s commanding officer records that ‘this poem was born of fire and blood during the hottest phase of the second battle of Ypres’. This battle began on April 22 1915 and lasted 17 days. Total casualties have been estimated at 100,000 on either side.

Half the Canadian brigade to which John McRae was attached were killed.

Shortly afterwards a profoundly weary McRae was posted away from the front line to a hospital in Boulogne. Friends were worried by the change in him.

He worked at the hospital until January 1918, and was about to take up a post with the British army when he fell ill with double pneumonia and meningitis, and died on January 28.

He is buried in the cemetery at Wimereux, France.

After its publication in Punch the poem soon became the unofficial anthem of the soldiers in the trenches where it was memorised and passed on by word of mouth.

One of the many readers moved by it was Moina Michael, the American War Secretary of the YMCA (Young Men’s Christian Association).
She suggested that American ex-servicemen adopt the poppy as their emblem, and started plans for artificial poppies to be made.

In November 1918, Moina Michael penned a response to McCrae’s poem entitled “We shall keep the faith” where she promised to wear a red poppy each year in remembrance.

We Shall Keep the Faith

Oh! you who sleep in Flanders Fields,
Sleep sweet – to rise anew!
We caught the torch you threw
And holding high, we keep the Faith
With All who died

We cherish, too, the poppy red
That grows on fields where valor led;
It seems to signal to the skies
That blood of heroes never dies,
But lends a lustre to the red
Of the flower that blooms above the dead
In Flanders Fields

And now the Torch and Poppy Red
We wear in honor of our dead.
Fear not that ye have died for naught;
We’ll teach the lesson that ye wrought
In Flanders Fields

The Tradition grows

In 1918, on the 11th day of the 11th month at 11 o’clock in the morning the Germans signed the armistice and World War One was officially over.

That day is now remembered as Armistice Day or Remembrance Day.

The idea of wearing silk Poppies caught on and soon became a tradition amongst those wishing to remember the soldiers who had not returned.

Wearing a poppy in November is a way of remembering those who gave their lives for their country.

The first Poppy Day was held on November 11 1921 and John McRae’s poem has been associated with the Poppy Appeal ever since.

On Armistice Day in Ieper (Ypres) in Flanders, the idea for The Poppy Umbrella was inspired by the powerful image of poppies growing amongst the soldiers’ graves in John McCrae’s poem.

Note by the editor:

Some years ago when I went to Ieper (Ypres) for the first time I came back and said to June that the whole trip had been kind of eerie.
I found that driving around in the western part of South Flanders, around where Ieper and Koksijde are, that I was driving around in one big graveyard.

The old bunkers, the abandoned airfields and the tank defenses still there make you feel that it could still be war.
Just no more soldiers ….

[Footnote: Did you know that more than 3000 years ago Poppies were taken to the graves of the dead as a sign of respect!]

* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *


The South African Meat Industry Company,
Samic has very nice meat cutting charts.
Just click on the banner below for lots of interesting information.
I must compliment whoever does the SAMIC newsletter for their lovely sayings! Have look, they are amazing!

Our Home Biltong Makers top

A happy and a sad story …..

It is said that a picture paints a thousand words. This is particularly true with the picture Neil Rossister from England sent us. He reckons that even the lady at the Post Office has staked a claim!

Good luck and happy Biltong Making Neil. It’s so nice to see a smiling face!

Please email us if you need any help.
As a thank you for your smile I will be sending you half a kilogram of our famous safari pre-mixed biltong spice soon.

And then …. there is the sad story about Bill, an ex-Rhodie from Canada. He runs a little chat web site. Bill ordered his biltong maker at the end of September to be delivered by surface mail from South Africa. He paid with PayPal.
Three weeks later he decides that he has now waited long enough and cancels his PayPal payment. Goods not received! “I’ll pay when the goods finally get here”
This is the very first time in our 12 years of existence that this has happened. What did you expect Bill? A low-flying ox wagon?
Three weeks via surface mail? Come on, not even airmail orders take that short!

Needless to say that Bill did not send us his picture.:-((

Exciting News about Rockey’s Home Biltong Maker!

All of our products are constantly being upgraded in order to maintain the high standard of workmanship we have become known for over the last 12 years.

However, it is not often that we can announce a major development!

At last, after months of testing and preparing we can announce that Rockey’s new Age Home Biltong Maker will be supplied with a fan option. A fan will assist with the drying of the meat especially in areas where high humidity is experienced at times.

Although not necessary, the fan will certainly reduce the drying time giving those people who make Biltong on a small commercial basis a chance to increase their output!

Talking about small industrial manufacturers I must think about one of our customers in England who makes Biltong at home and then sells it on EBay! Apart from making money out of it he also keeps himself supplied with Biltong free of charge!

The fan option will be available as an accessory in our on-line shop and will cost only R 155.00 fitted or
R 99.50 as a “do-it-yourself’ kit.

It will be available from the middle of January.

As an additional improvement all Rockey’s Biltong Makers will be fitted with an on/off switch and both Home Biltong Makers will be fitted with a standard EU cable with a moulded two-pin plug.

And so, once again, we have improved on previous models and have made it easier and quicker than ever before for you to make your Biltong. Not convinced yet? Just read about what people are saying (we only started keeping records in 2001) on our customers comments page.

So, to all of you who have not tried it yet, now is the time!

ESPECIALLY WITH SOME VERY NICE SPECIAL PRICING WE HAVE UNTIL THE END OF THE YEAR! (SEE BELOW!)

You too could be making your own Biltong in a very short space of time.
Have a look at our Home Biltong Makers and see how easy it is!!

Details on ROCKEY’S 5kg Home Biltong Maker can be found by clicking on this link.

You can have a look at the BILTONG BUDDY here.

This month’s specials top

Special Christmas Pricing for Special Customers!

Free with all Biltong Maker orders placed

  • 20 special Biltong storage bags
  • A packet of our famous Nice ‘n Spicy spices.

Click here to go to our on-line shop.

[These special offers are for a limited period only and can be changed without prior notice!]

Tips of the month top


Mushroom potatoes

Some months ago whilst watching a cookery program on DSTV, I came across a visually pleasing potato tip which I tried immediately and I found it immensely satisfying to prepare potatoes in this way and I would now like to share it with everyone who reads this.

This works best with small roundish potatoes.

Start by peeling them and try to improve the roundness when peeling. Cut the potato in half. Take an apple-corer [usually a stainless steel circle shaped utensil with serrated teeth at the end] and shove/turn it into the middle of the flat surface that you have just cut, about half-way. Leave it there and take a knife and cut a 10mm “skirt” horizontal to the flat surface into and towards the corer which is still in the potato, whilst turning.

The “skirt” is now loose and can be broken off or slid down the corer shaft, to be used elsewhere.
Now, gently slide the corer off the potato shaft or push it out with your pinkie and you now are left with a potato that looks like a white button mushroom!

This may sound like hard work, but I found that after a few minutes I could churn them out at a rapid rate and they look so good!
Either deep-fry them or use in your Potjie, but not for too long as they will start to disintegrate and you will lose the mushroom effect.

They look and taste so good and everyone is very perplexed as to the taste and as to what they really are. Everyone loves them as we all “eat with our eyes”, don’t we?

Enjoy!
Ben Schultz
Nelspruit
South Africa

Our spices are Kosher and Halaal!

It will certainly interest our Jewish readers that our biltong spices are certified as being kosher by the Beth Din of Johannesburg. Anyone interested can mail us for a copy of the certification. (new 2007 certification is now available)
Our Muslim readers can rest assured that all our spices are certified Halaal by the Muslim Judicial Council Halaal Trust. A copy of the 2007 certificate is available on request.

South African Meat Cutting Charts


Below you will find three excellent meat cutting charts.

These are displayed with the compliments of SAMIC.
(The South African Meat Industry Company).
SAMIC has a very interesting web site as well as a weekly newsletter about anything to do with the
Meat Industry in South Africa.
Now, don’t think this is a totally boring web site (I thought so first) but it has some very interesting articles and statistics.

Beef Cutting Chart Pork Cutting Chart Lamb Cutting Chart
* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *

Welcome to Apartment Oberholzer in Vienna, Austria
Winter or summer, our charming Viennese building will make you feel right at home. As our guests’ well-being is a matter close to our hearts, the quiet residence offers every convenience from a microwave, dishwasher and washing machine to Satellite TV.

The Vienna city center is within 10 minutes walking distance. Public transport is right at the Guest house.

Our well-kept, 54 m² newly renovated non-smoking holiday flat is suitable for 1-4 people. It is central, quiet, charming and very reasonably priced.

For further information please see our website www.netland.at/wien/oberholzer

Questions and Answers top

As in every newsletter, here is our regular section with some of the many questions we receive from our readers all over the world.
If we have not given an answer and you can help these people could you please mail them?
(Please copy us in on your mails @ info@biltongmakers.com
so we can help other people who might have the same questions in the future)

QUESTION

Hi there,

Saw your website and am looking for a Kudu Potjie recipe. Please could you send me one or does anybody have one?

Thanks,
Mike Gooch
South Africa
mike@cogs.co.za

QUESTION

Hello all,

I am interested in an old fashioned biltong drying cupboard.
Could you please give me a call or drop me a mail and let me know where I can get one of these in South Africa?

Thanks a lot
Karen Rudd
Johannesburg, South Africa
karen@leap.co.za
Tel: 083-327-2133

QUESTION

Hi Team

Can you perhaps tell me how do I make biltong wheels and biltong chips. I bought my own equipment to make wors and I want to sell droëwors and biltong on a small scale. Do I give some potential buyers a taste first or where do I begin .I also got myself a scale ,packages and a sealer. Your soonest reply will be appreciated.

Cheers
Hugo Boezak
George, South Africa
hboezak@distell.co.za

QUESTION

I am still looking for a cheese wors recipe. Can anybody help please????

Kevin Hayes
United Kingdom
kevinhayes460@btinternet.com

Stoep Talk top

Pampoens weren’t impressed with the celery …
By James Clarke

I used to be a keen gardener, especially when it came to growing vegetables. Not long ago I was asked to address a garden club in the next street to where my fame as a gardener had spread. The subject: “Gardening as a therapy”.

When I sat down to think about the subject, I realised most of my gardening was pure therapy anyway, because most of what I grew was thrown away. My family was unable to keep up with production.

You cannot plant one cabbage just as you cannot plant one potato or a single bunch of carrots. So, in midsummer you end up with a dozen full-grown cabbages, kilograms of beans, clouds of cauliflower, brinjals by the bag and tomatoes enough to stock Woolworths.

My wife would say: “We cannot possibly eat a cabbage a day.”

‘We cannot possibly eat a cabbage a day’ I couldn’t see why not. If we were starving we’d give an arm and leg for a fat cabbage. “Give them to the neighbours,” she said, knowing perfectly well that the last season when I threw cabbages over the wall the neighbours threw them back. In any event, in any suburb north of Parktown West, one is not allowed to talk to one’s neighbours.

I think there’s a by-law.

There are exceptions. For instance, in the event of a fire next door one is allowed to call out “Fire!” three times; and again, in the event of an earthquake registering 9 on the Richter Scale, or, say, in the event of a catastrophic flood such as we had in 1994 when I last had cause to address a neighbour.

There was a howling gale, I recall. The rain was lashing down and my neighbour was frantically smashing a hole though the back wall of his garage.

Flood water was damming up against the back of his house and the pressure had to be relieved.

“Having a spot of bother, are we?” I called over the fence.

“Yes,” he shouted over the roar of the water.

I clucked – loudly, in the hope he could hear that I was concerned. But neither of us went on and on about it. Eventually the wall burst and he was washed away, probably ending up in the mainstream Jukskei. I kept meaning to ask our maid to ask their maid if they found him.

Anyway, these particular neighbours were wary of me because they once saw me talking to my vegetables. Talking to vegetables provides excellent mental therapy.

I have often wondered what would have happened had my neighbours learned that when they were out I peeped over the wall and talked to their vegetables, too. (I just said “Howzit?” and things like that.)

My modest success in growing vegetables was not due to any innate farming genius within the Clarke family. In fact the Clarkes, right back to the time of Ethelred the Unsteady, have been intensely urban people who mostly ended their days by being run over by buses or falling down manholes.

My success with beans and things was, I am convinced, because I talked to them as equals.

Many people do not believe me but, sometimes, vegetables talk back. I have recorded elsewhere (see Annals of the Cruciferous Soc., Nat Arch. Vol III 8673:1 op cit. sit op.) how cabbages enjoy talking politics. Pumpkins, too. The latter sometimes get into parliament.

Onions can be so emotional they bring tears to one’s eyes; turnips can be hilarious.

When I suggested to a particularly healthy lettuce that she went into politics with the pumpkins she said the celery… wasn’t good enough. Oh how we laughed.

Recipe Corner top


Two lovely recipes!

In the last newsletter (August) we had several bread recipes. This month something different from long, long ago.

Here we go ….

Ron Warren’s biltong recipe

This is a Biltong recipe sent in by Ron Warren from South Africa in November 2003.

Ingredients for the spice mix

  • 700 gm medium salt
  • 180 gm brown sugar
  • 15 ml black pepper
  • 120 gm ground coriander (I do not enjoy the scorched and coarsely ground as it sticks in teeth)
  • 30ml bicarbonate of soda

How to use the spice mix and make the Biltong

  • Sprinkle 40 gm per kg of meat
  • Add a generous sprinkle of vinegar between layers of biltong
  • Allow to stand for at least 6 to 8 hours turning the meat over half way
  • Dip biltong in 350ml vinegar and 4.5 liters of boiling water (or hot) and hang to dry

I have lines in my pantry above my fridge and deep freezes with a fan mounted to one side and this works like a dream especially in muggy damp weather.
The heat off the fridge and freezers keeps the air dry especially at night. The biltong is allowed to drip until dry outside before I move it inside.
I make biltong and dry wors the whole year round.

For my dry wors I use a dry wors premix but add 1/3 chili-bite biltong mix to it and even my kids love it.

All the best
Ron Warren
South Africa
ronwarren@xsinet.co.za

George Wolvaardt se Potjiekos

This recipe was sent to us by George Wolvaardt in July 2003

Hierdie potjie is altyd lekkerrrr!!

Dit kan binneshuis op die stoof gemaak word as die weer baie sleg is, gebruik platboom potjie vir die stoof.

Wat om the gebruik

  • 1 kg Stowe beesvleis ( in blokkies gesny) Skaap of hoender werk net so lekker.
  • 1 ui fyngekap
  • 3 knoffelhuisies fyngekap
  • 25 ml olyfolie
  • Groente na smaak. Ons gebruik gewoonlik wortels, aartappels, baba-kooltjies of kool in kwarte gesny en botterskorsie in stukke gesny.
  • 1 koppie fyngekapte pietersielie
  • 1 eetlepel fyn koljander
  • 1 eetlepel BBQ speserye
  • 1 liter kookwater
  • 100 ml tamatiesous ( ………ek bêre altyd my laaste bietjie tamatiesous in die bottel vir potjiekos en vul dit dan met die blokkie en kookwater…………!!!!)
  • 1 beesvleis-aftreksel-blokkie
  • 1 teelepel sout
  • halwe teelepel vars gemaalde swartpeper

Metode:

  • Voeg die olie in potjie en verbruin die vleis
  • Voeg nou die uie en knoffel by die vleis en soteer die uie en knoffel saam met die vleis tot uie deurskynend is
  • Pak nou die groente in lae, eerste die aartappels, dan die wortels dan die kool en laaste die pampoenstukke
  • Gooi die speserye en al die oorblywend bestandele by die liter aftrekselmengsel en gooi oor die potjiekos
  • Sodra dit kook, strooi die pietersielie oor en plaas die deksel op, prut vir EEN UUR
  • Bedien op lekker rys of krummelpap
  • Beetslaai gaan ook lekker daarmee saam. HEER-R-R-LIk !!

Moenie vergeet om ‘n lekker wyntjie saam voor te sit nie.
Geniet rustig saam met familie en vrinne.

George Wolvaardt
South Africa
gwolvaardt@lando.co.za

Click below for our handy cooking converter

News from South Africa top

Is South Africa on the brink of a total blackout?
15-11-2007

Escom’s system of rotating existing power supplies – known as load shedding – will be with the country for between five to seven years while systems are upgraded to cope with increased demand, the company said on Thursday.

“We expect the reserve margin to continue on a downward trend for the next five to seven years until (a) new base-load power plant is built,” the company’s media desk said.

Over the last decade, South Africa had experienced a steady growth in the demand for electricity linked to increased economic growth.

This had exhausted Escom’s surplus electricity generation capacity and reduced the reserve margin progressively.

In response, it accelerated the implementation of its capacity expansion program and would invest R150-billion in the upgrading of the country’s power supply infra-structure.

The biggest percentage of that expenditure would go towards improving generation capacity and would include the construction of new power stations.

Meanwhile, to cope with the reduced reserve capacity, the company had introduced load shedding, rotating power supplies nationally, to avoid a total blackout.

On Thursday morning supplies were powering ahead, but customers were urged to continue conserving energy by switching off non-essential equipment and geysers to reduce demand.

Businesses were asked to switch off non-essential lighting and office equipment during peak usage periods between 7am and 10am and 6pm and 9pm.

Escom thanked customers already carrying out these measures.

Prepare for seven years of blackouts!

Blackouts are here to stay – for up to seven years, says Escom.

An Escom spokesperson said demand and supply for electricity was “tight”, and that load-shedding was “not short-term”.

His comments came as South Africans endured another cycle of load shedding across the country, the result of unplanned outages and equipment repairs at a number of Escom’s power station units.

Load shedding was stopped temporarily on Wednesday afternoon, but was likely to resume towards evening, said Escom.

Escom spokesperson Tony Stott said load shedding would begin again “as we move into peak hours… probably at around 5pm or 6pm”.

Stott said power stations hit by unplanned outages “usually” took between half a day and three days to repair.

The need for repairs arose from “normal wear and tear” at mechanical power stations.

“We have been running them hard for the past few days to meet demand for electricity because there is not enough spare capacity.”

On Wednesday morning about 10 percent of plants were undergoing planned maintenance and about seven percent unplanned maintenance, Stott said. This was an improvement on Tuesday night, when about 11 percent of units were undergoing unplanned maintenance.

“We were able to bring back some units last night. Load shedding could be expected (today), but may be prevented towards the weekend as demand for electricity decreases.”

Stott said South Africans should be aware that load shedding was a reality to deal with for the next few years.

Crime News Update
November 2007

And you thought that crime only happens in the big cities and not in the small coastal towns?
You must be kidding!

79-year-old ‘hero’ recovering

La Lucia, November 15 2007
By Rivonia Naidu

Roger Wright will forever be his family’s biggest hero. And as he celebrated his 79th birthday on Wednesday, he was surrounded by his loving wife, Myra, his children, Julia Paterson, Simon Wright and Diane Whittaker, as well as most of his 10 grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

They described him as a great man with a strong will and fighting power.

Wright and his wife Myra were attacked in La Lucia on Monday night, when an intruder armed with a knife broke into their home on Wilden Place and attempted to rob the couple.

Wright’s sheer determination and love for his family helped him fight off the armed attacker, who fled the scene.

However, Wright was seriously wounded in the chest and at the back of his neck as the intruder stabbed him several times.

He is now in ICU at St Augustine’s Hospital, where he is recovering. Myra is traumatized and will receive counseling.

On Wednesday, with a traumatized Myra by her side, Whittaker said her dad was everyone’s biggest hero.

“He’s the greatest father ever. Our parents are the best, they’re wonderful, loving and the most supportive parents,” she said.

She said on the night they were attacked, her parents, who celebrated 55 years of marriage this year, were having a romantic candle-lit dinner when the intruder walked into their home.

“My mum said the evening started off so beautifully. She and my dad were enjoying their meal when my mom noticed the intruder, but because she couldn’t do anything, my father got up and looked for him.

“The intruder then attacked my father from behind and a huge scuffle ensued. The intruder stabbed my father many times and he was bleeding profusely.”

Whittaker said her mother then began screaming and the intruder went into the kitchen, picked her mother up and threw her across the room.

“The intruder flung my mother so hard that she hit her head on the fridge. He then tried to throttle her, but my father, although he was seriously injured, came back into the kitchen and pulled the man off my mother. I don’t know what happened, but the man then ran away.”

She said she was also thankful to her parents’ neighbour, Anton Lailvaux.

“He saved my dad’s life. He helped by trying to stop the bleeding and by calling the necessary emergency officials.”

She said although the entire family was traumatized, they were grateful that her parents’ lives were spared.

“They loved their home, I mean they lived in it for 35 years and I would have really hated it if their lives ended in a place that’s so special to them.

Whittaker described her family as just another victim of crime in South Africa.

Friday, November 2, 2007

“They are hurting her, they are hurting her……

These were the anguished words a Pretoria man heard as his domestic worker described to him over her cell phone how his wife was being attack by armed thugs who had broken into their home in Lynnwood Manor.

Gideon Odendaal, who was in Cape Town on business, listened as Fransiena Majadibodu described the attack in a whisper while hiding under a bed.

The men – three of whom were arrested within hours of allegedly torturing, sexually assaulting and killing Cathy Odendaal on Tuesday – are believed to have overpowered Odendaal while she was walking through the garden of her home in Farnham Road.

It is believed the men may be linked to a spate of house attacks in the area, including the shooting of the three-year-old child of Musa Ebrahim’s domestic worker during an attack on his home, also in Farnham Road, on Sunday.

It is believed that Odendaal, who ran a raw material trading business, surprised the men when she returned after going shopping.

They overpowered her as she tried to run into the house.

It is believed she was killed when, after being tortured and left for dead, she managed to press a panic button.

The security company then called Gideon to inquire if the family was all right. He frantically called their home and her cell phone. He then called Majadibodu. Whispering, she told him how she was hiding under the bed and there were men in the house attacking his wife.

“She kept saying that Cathy was calling for help. “She kept saying: ‘She is crying, she is crying.’ She said Cathy was calling her and that her killers were hurting her.

“She kept saying: ‘They are hurting her, they are hurting her, they are hurting her,'” he said.

He called the police, his security company and the neighbourhood watch. “I did not know what to do. I did not how I could help my wife. I did not know what was happening to her. “All I wanted to do was protect her,” he said.

He said it was clear from the state the property was in that his wife had put up a fight. Her body was found in a washroom. “It is terrible. I do not want to know what she went through. I cannot bear to go inside.”

“My wife is dead. What am I going to do? What am I going to do now?” he asked, adding that their children no longer wanted to live in the house.

“We cannot bear to be in the house. It is just too awful,” he said. He said it was not known how the killers got into the house. “There is no sign of forced entry. It is a complete mystery”.

Police spokesperson Inspector Paul Ramaloko said that three people who had been arrested in connection with Odendaal’s murder, would appear in court soon. He said a gun as well as jewelry believed to belong to Odendaal had been recovered.

So, consider the following:

The USA has been at war in Iraq for some 4 years, approx 3500 soldiers killed in action. The scale of this conflict has resulted in effectively a regime change with both the US Senate and House changing from Republican to Democrat.

The scale of the conflict in South Africa is that every year, some 30 000 people are killed, someone raped every 2 minutes (our government seeks to withhold accurate crime statistics from us, probably due to the scale of the slaughter) and one of our ministers calls those who question and criticize him “WHINGERS” who should leave the country!

Our President must agree with him, since there has been no public retraction, let alone rebuke.

Around the World top

Bits and Bobs from people around the world

Has anyone seen or heard from David Lewis from Whakatane in New Zealand??

Hi, My name is Stephen Coote and I live in Nelson, New Zealand.
I’ve started to experiment making biltong, and more recently sausages, using game meat which I get myself.

This afternoon I made some sausages based on your Whakatane Wors recipe. I used the meat from an Australian Brushtailed Opossum, and the casings were the intestines of the same animal.
I think these are the best sausages I’ve made so far.
So I want to say thanks for publishing the recipe, and it would be nice if somehow my thanks could be passed on to David Lewis who originally provided this recipe. He may be interested to know that our national pest animal, the possum, was used successfully instead of beef in his recipe.
I would be happy for you to forward my email to him if possible.

I have a question. Can droe wors be eaten without cooking (like biltong)?

Many thanks in advance
Stephen Coote
New Zealand
coote@clear.net.nz

Hi Lo

Trust everything is OK on your side. I say this, because I notice you are depriving me of my monthly “fix” of your excellent newsletter.

You have no idea how much everyone I know looks forward to your newsletters. I hope that it is merely pressure of business keeping you too busy for the newsletters and not something more serious.

Anyway, hope to hear from you soon!
Regards

Annie Sieber
Equipment Admin Manager
Crown National
Johannesburg, South Africa

That’s nice Annie and all the others at Crown National! Your mail will keep me going again for a while. You talk about your monthly “fix”. Well, your mail was a good “fix” for me!
It’s nice to see that all the hard work is actually read! I hope you enjoy this newsletter. (Ed)

PS. I wonder if Liekie and Fernando read it (get it)?

Hello,

Thank you once again for a great newsletter.

Here are a few things that you may like to use as contributions….

The first is an answer to Moira Cochrane who asked for a good Milktart recipe – here is mine and it is REALLY good. I don’t bake too well but this seems to work every time and I have even been brave enough to make it as a Christmas gift for various locals.

Traditional Melktert

Pastry Ingredients

  • ¼ cup margarine
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 1 cup self-raising flour
  • pinch salt
  • 2 tablespoons iced water

What to do

  • Cream marge and sugar together
  • Work in the flour and salt
  • Add water and work to a soft dough
  • Wrap up and chill until required

Filling Ingredients

  • 2 cups milk
  • 1 stick cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 4 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 4 tablespoons flour
  • vanilla essence (optional)

How to do it

  • Scald milk with cinnamon stick (you could use a double boiler but I just use a good pot)
  • Combine sugar and flour and stir in the hot milk slowly
  • Return to heat and cook for about 15 min (no lid) stirring from time to time
  • Remove from heat and stir in the butter
  • When cool add eggs one at a time, beating well each time
  • Line a 22cm tart plate with pastry and pour filling in
  • Bake at 200 degrees for 20 mins
  • Before serving sprinkle the top with cinnamon and castor sugar

My second contribution is a joke I read in the 5th of July edition of You magazine – my husband brings them back to me when he travels home for work so that I can catch up on the general skinner.

Men Megastore:
A store that sells husbands has just opened in New York City but it clearly states in its rules women may visit it only once.

There are six floors and the men get better as the shopper ascends the building. Women may choose a man from any floor but may not go down again except to exit the building.

A woman goes to the store and on the first floor finds a sign that reads, “These men have jobs and love the Lord.”

The sign on the second floor reads, “These men have jobs, love the Lord and love kids.”

The sign on the third floor reads, “These men have jobs, love the Lord, love kids and are extremely good-looking.”

“Wow,” she thinks but feels compelled to keep going.
She goes to the fourth floor where the sign reads, “These men have jobs, love the Lord, love kids, are drop-dead good-looking and help with the housework.”

“I can’t stand it!” she exclaims and rushes up to the fifth floor where the sign reads, “These men have jobs, love the Lord, love kids, are drop-dead gorgeous, help with the housework and have a strong romantic streak.”

The woman is tempted to stay but eventually goes up to the sixth floor where the sign reads, “There are no men on this floor. This floor exists solely as proof that women are impossible to please. Thank you for shopping at the Husband Store. Watch your step as you exit the building and have a nice day!”

Finally a response or question for Chris who wrote in your August newsletter; “Has the penny finally dropped”?

I so wish that I were back in South Africa to somehow be part of the solution, any ideas of how I might be able to play any small part while stuck here?
I try promoting the SA wherever possible and encourage whoever I can to visit, and the people who have, have loved the experience and want to go back again.

Looking forward to next month’s edition.
Kind regards
Carla McLachlan
carla_mclachlan@hotmail.com

[Thank your for putting in the effort and giving us a lovely contribution. Wish there were more of you! – Ed]

The following is a contribution from Carol James from Worthing in the UK.
Read this carefully because it’s so true!!

HANDBAGS…

Have you ever noticed gals who sit their handbags on public toilet floors – then go directly to their dining tables and set it on the table?

Happens a lot!

It’s not always the ‘restaurant food’ that causes stomach distress. Sometimes “what you don’t know ‘will’ hurt you”!
My Mum used to get so upset when guests came in the door and plopped their handbags down on the counter where she was cooking or setting up food. She always said that handbags are really dirty, because of where they have been.

While we may know what’s inside our handbags, do you have any idea what’s on the outside? Shauna Lake put handbags to the test – for bacteria – with surprising results. You may think twice about where you put your handbag.

Women carry handbags everywhere; from the office to public toilets to the floor of the car. Most women won’t be caught without their handbags, but did you ever stop to think about where your handbag goes during the day?

“I drive a school bus, so my handbag has been on the floor of the bus a lot,” says one woman. “On the floor of my car, and in toilets.” “I put my handbag in grocery shopping carts, on the floor of the toilet while changing a nappy,” says another woman “and of course in my home which should be clean.”

We decided to find out if handbags harbor a lot of bacteria. We learned how to test them at Nelson Laboratories in Salt Lake. Most women told us they didn’t stop to think about what was on the bottom of their handbag. Most said at home they usually set their handbags on top of kitchen tables and counters where food is prepared.

It turns out handbags are so surprisingly dirty, even the microbiologist who tested them was shocked. Microbiologist Amy Karen of Nelson Labs says nearly all of the handbags tested were not only high in bacteria, but high in harmful kinds of bacteria. Pseudomonas can cause eye infections, staphylococcus aurous can cause serious skin infections, and salmonella and e-coli found on the handbags could make people very sick.

In one sampling, four of five handbags tested positive for salmonella, and that’s not the worst of it. “There is fecal contamination on the handbags,” says Amy. Leather or vinyl handbags tended to be cleaner than cloth handbags, and lifestyle seemed to play a role.
People with kids tended to have dirtier handbags than those without, with one exception.
The handbag of one single woman who frequented nightclubs had one of the worst contaminations of all. “Some type of feces, or possibly vomit” says Amy.

So the moral of this story – your handbag won’t kill you, but it does have the potential to make you very sick if you keep it on places where you eat. Use hooks to hang your handbag at home and in toilets, and don’t put it on your desk, a restaurant table, or on your kitchen countertop.

Experts say you should think of your handbag the same way you would a pair of shoes. “If you think about putting a pair of shoes onto your countertops, that’s the same thing you’re doing when you put your handbag on the counter-tops” – your handbag has gone where individuals before you have sneezed, coughed, spat, urinated, emptied bowels, etc!

Do you really want to bring that home with you?

[Thank you Carol – never thought of that really -Ed]

Something to smile about top


How to give a cat a pill

You will have seen this before, it’s been around for ages in one form or another, but it always makes for a good read, especially if you are a cat lover!

    1. Pick up the cat, and cradle it in the crook of your left arm as if holding a baby. Position right forefinger and thumb on either side of the cat’s mouth and gently apply pressure to the cheeks whilst holding the pill in the right hand. As you gradually ease the cat’s mouth open in this fashion, pop the pill into it’s mouth and allow the cat to close mouth and swallow.
    1. Retrieve pill from floor and cat from behind sofa. Cradle the cat in left arm again, and repeat process.
    1. Retrieve cat from under the bed in the main bedroom, and throw away the soggy pill.
    1. Take new pill from foil wrap, cradle cat in left arm holding rear paws tightly with left hand. Force jaws open and thrust pill to the back of it’s mouth with right forefinger. Hold cat’s mouth shut for count of ten.
    1. Retrieve pill from goldfish bowl and cat from top of wardrobe. Call spouse in from garden to assist.
    1. Kneel on floor with cat firmly wedged between knees. Hold front and rear paws. Ignore growls emitted from cat. Get spouse to hold cat’s head firmly with one hand while forcing wooden ruler into mouth. Drop pill down ruler, and rub cat’s throat vigorously.
    1. Retrieve cat from curtain rail. Get another pill from foil wrap. Make a mental note to buy a new ruler and repair curtains. Carefully sweep shattered figurines and vases from floor, and set aside for gluing later.
    1. Wrap cat in large towel and get spouse to lie on cat with cat’s head just visible from below armpit. Put pill in end of drinking straw and force cat’s mouth open with pencil. Blow forcefully down straw.
    1. Check label on cat’s pills to see if they are harmful to humans. Drink beer to take away the taste and apply band-aid to spouse’s forearm. Remove blood from carpet with soap and water, and discard shredded towel in waste bin.
    1. Retrieve cat from neighbour’s shed. Get another pill. Open another beer. Place cat in cupboard and close door on cat’s neck so as to leave only the head protruding. Force mouth open with spoon, and however much force it takes. Flick pill down throat with elastic band.
    1. Fetch screwdriver from garage to put the cupboard door back on hinges. Drink beer. Pour scotch and drink in one gulp. Apply cold compress to cheek, and check date of last tetanus jab. Apply whisky compress to cheek to disinfect and toss back another shot for good measure. Throw T-shirt in bin next to shredded towel.
    1. Ring fire brigade to retrieve cat from tree across the road, and apologize profusely to neighbour who crashed into his pool whilst swerving to avoid the cat. Take last pill from foil wrap.
    1. Tie the little sod’s front paws and rear paws tightly to legs of metal garden chairs with twine. Find heavy pruning gloves from shed. Push into cat’s mouth, followed by a large piece of fillet steak. Hold cat’s head vertical, and pour two liters of water down cat’s throat to wash down pill.
    1. Consume remainder of scotch. Get spouse to drive you to emergency room for stitching of your fingers and forearm, and removal of pill from your left nostril. Call in at garden center on way home to get new garden chairs.
  1. Arrange with SPCA to collect mutant cat from hell and find out if they have any hamsters who need good homes.

HOW TO GIVE A DOG A PILL:
Wrap it in bacon.

Nursery Rhymes?

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall
The structure of the wall was incorrect
So he won a grand with Claims Direct.

It’s Raining, It’s Pouring.
Oh sh*t, it’s Global Warming.

Mary had a little lamb
her father shot it dead.
Now it goes to school with her
between two chunks of bread.

Simple Simon met a pie man going to the fair.
Said Simple Simon to the pie man
“What have u got there?”
Said the pie man unto Simon
Pies you d**khead.

Mary had a little lamb
it ran into a pylon.
10,000 volts went up its a*se
and turned its wool to nylon.

Georgie Porgie Pudding and Pie
kissed the girls and made them cry.
When the boys came out to play
he kissed them too cause he was gay.

Jack and Jill
Went up the hill
And planned to do some kissing.
Jack made a pass
and grabbed her a*se
Now two of his teeth are missing.

Mary had a little lamb
Its fleece was white and wispy.
Then it caught Foot and Mouth Disease
And now it’s black and crispy.

Sport talk top

Why the Springboks deserve to be champions
by Gavin Rich

Two weeks on from the World Cup and still I keep hearing idiots say that the Springboks are somehow not worthy champions because they did not play New Zealand or Australia along the way.

This makes no sense. New Zealand never got to play South Africa at the World Cup because they weren’t good enough to beat France in a quarter-final played on neutral territory. That same French team then returned to French soil and were beaten by England.

England, already hammered 36-0 by South Africa in a pool game, were then comprehensively outplayed again by the Springboks, who always seemed to have something in hand, in the final.

The French who beat the All Blacks were also outplayed twice by Argentina, who in turn were beaten by 23 points by the Boks in the semi-final, again in a match where John Smit’s team never really appeared to raise a sweat.
So as a New Zealand rugby writing mate put it to me, where does that leave the All Blacks?

In the case of Australia, they lost to England in the quarter-final in Marseilles, and the ease with which the England forwards destroyed the Wallaby pack suggests the Boks probably would have done the same. The Boks have a lot more skill at the back than England do, and would have put the Wallabies away given the same forward dominance.

If Australia were not good enough to beat England and New Zealand were not good enough to beat a weak French team, then they didn’t deserve to win the World Cup, and to their credit, most Kiwis and Aussies of my acquaintance agree with this assessment.

Most of them reckon the Boks were the best team at the World Cup because they were best equipped to alternate between the various types of game strategy required to win the tournament.

And ultimately, Bob Skinstad is right – the only way to become world champions is to win the World Cup. The All Blacks haven’t done that since 1987 so they are not world champions. In athletics it is all about who wins the Olympic gold medal every four years, and it has become the same in rugby, just as it is in soccer and cricket.

I did feel a bit cheated by not seeing the Boks and All Blacks clash at the World Cup. It was the clash everyone was waiting for. I would like to have seen them play because I am convinced that, given the type of rugby that prevails in the knock-out stages of the World Cup, as well as the brainless rugby the All Blacks play when the pressure is on, South Africa would have won.

In the only full-strength meeting between the two teams this year the dice was loaded against the Boks, who were feeling the effects of fatigue after several months of non-stop rugby because of South Africa’s success in the Super 14. For those who forget, the Boks were also that day without Bryan Habana, Fourie du Preez, a first choice No 8, Juan Smith and skipper John Smit.

Most of those players were hugely influential at the World Cup. It was also before Graham Henry had his brain explosion by dropping backline playmaker Aaron Mauger, so the All Blacks were arguably also a much better team in that Durban Test than they were at the World Cup.

And yet the Boks led the All Blacks most of the way, and it was only the Kiwi depth on the bench that got them home as they came from behind. I doubt they would be capable of coming from behind in a high pressured World Cup final for the simple reason that over and over again they have proved they just don’t have the temperament to handle the massive expectation of their nation.

That is why they are perennial also-rans in the tournament that matters and why they are not world champions. Those who disagree should just go and look at the names inscribed on the Webb Ellis trophy, and then go buy a couple of sacks of lemons that they can suck on for the next four years.

Snippets from the papers

‘New coach must choose his assistants’
The choices for the next assistant coaches for the Boks are as critical as the man who will take over from Jake White, convener of selectors Peter Jooste says.
Full Story…

England felt like a pub team – Dallaglio
England hooker Mark Regan has hit back at teammate Lawrence Dallaglio’s scathing attack on their coach, which he dismissed as a marketing ploy to sell his new autobiography.
Full Story…

Smit overjoyed to be at Clermont
Springboks World Cup-winning captain John Smit has arrived at Clermont-Ferrand to join his new team.
Full Story…

Proteas ready to devour NZ top order
Makhaya Ntini, Dale Steyn and Andre Nel must be licking their lips at the prospect of facing up to New Zealand’s shaky top order in the first Test.
Full Story…

Third World realities weigh on 2010 World Cup
Carl Peters has some thoughts on why Fifa president Sepp Blatter is pushing for an end to the World Cup rotation policy…
Full Story…

-How to watch Rugby from your armchair-
Click here to find out!

Let’s hear from you too!! top

Let’s make the next issue a Bumper one!

Our regular readers (like Annie and her comrades at Crown National) may have noticed that I have gone from a monthly issue to a bi-monthly one and even worse! The reason is simple. It is impossible to do a newsletter of this size on my own. I am an editor and rely on you the readers for input!

You are probably sitting at the computer right now so how about it. Let our readers enjoy your story!
It does not have to be about Biltong or such. We’d love to hear where you live and how you have adapted yourself to your new life style and surroundings.

You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask?
Perhaps you have some advice to give?

You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Share it with other people around the world!

Click right here to start now or you can mail us at webmaster@biltongmakers.com

Boerewors in Europe top


Boerewors (Europe only, sorry people!)

Next Tuesday (November 20th) it will be up at 5 am again and freezing my fingers off mixing and spicing meat for our wors. I never want to be a butcher. Perhaps I should teach someone to do this for me! Thank goodness I don’t have to do the whole job myself!
It is still disappearing faster than we can make it and it is winter!
Nevertheless, we have fresh stock available all the time.

Ever seen a Springbok enjoying one of our boerie rolls (in Montpellier, France – the Fuji game)?
Well, by the look on his face Schalk enjoyed it and so will you!
Give it a try.

All you do is to go to www.boerewors.be and fill out the order form. You can either collect or we can mail it to you.

All our customers in Holland, Belgium and in fact, all over Europe are raving about the packing of and the condition in which the wors arrived at their doorsteps.

Just imagine some “lekker” pap and wors with a nice tomato and onion sauce!

Complete the order form you will find by going to www.boerewors.be or give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25.

Our Boerewors is vacuum packed in quantities of about 500 gram.
The normal price is € 8.45 per kg but for the time being we will keep it at only € 8.45 € 7.95 per kg!!

You can also place your order by simply clicking here.

Now also available at

STONEMANOR
The British Store in Everberg, Belgium – Telephone 02 759-4979

DIE WERF
The new South African shop in Tervuren, Belgium – Telephone 02 305-3296


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Droëwors for the UK and Europe! top


Droëwors …… a typical South African delicacy all of its own!

Droëwors, as it is known in South Africa, is as much part of the country’s culinary culture as Biltong, Pap, Boerewors and Potjiekos.
The spices are of course imported especially from South Africa so you will get the “real” thing!

Fresh droëwors is available right now and we normally have ample stock.

The price is € 40.00 € 30.00 per kilogram vacuum pack or € 4.50 € 4.00 per 100 gram packet.

Droëwors (like biltong) travels well and posting is an ideal option.
We can mail it to you anywhere in the world via priority mail in minimum quantities of 500 gram.
You can place your order now by going to www.boerewors.be, give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.

We are not responsible for packets confiscated by customs in your country.

Now also available at

STONEMANOR
The British Store in Everberg, Belgium – Telephone 02 759-4979

DE WIJN KRAAL
The South African Wine Specialist Store in Leuven, Belgium.
Telephone 016 58.46.06

DIE WERF
The new South African shop in Tervuren, Belgium – Telephone 02 305-3296


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Biltong for all our readers! top


Biltong …… once hooked you’re a slave forever!

Biltong is without doubt the snack most associated with South Africa!
It is so much part of South African culture that there is no food related shop that will not stock it. You find it literally anywhere.
Say Biltong and you say South Africa!

Biltongmakers.Com has for more than 12 years supplied their Home Biltong Makers to the South African expat so they could make their own biltong away from home.

We were often asked why we don’t make Biltong ourselves and then make it available to the poor and deprived ex-South Africans!
The requests have been relentless and constant so we decided to give it a go on a temporary basis. Just to see how well it would sell.

So, from now on you will be able to get your biltong directly from us.
The spices are of course imported from South Africa so you will get the “real” taste like “back home”!

The price is Euro 40.00 per 1kg vacuum pack or Euro 5.00 per 100 gram packet.

Biltong travels well and posting is an ideal option.
We can mail it to you anywhere in the world via priority mail.

To place your order please go to www.biltongmakers.be and click on one of the order form links. You can also call us on +32 (16) 53.96.25

We will get right back to you with how much the postage will be.

(For outside the EU we must mention that we are not responsible for packets confiscated by customs in your country.

Now also available at

STONEMANOR
The British Store in Everberg, Belgium – Telephone 02 759-4979

DE WIJN KRAAL
The South African Wine Specialist Store in Leuven, Belgium.
Telephone 016 58.46.06

DIE WERF
The new South African shop in Tervuren, Belgium – Telephone 02 305-3296


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Lamb on the Spit top


Lamb on the Spit ……. something special!

Keep this in mind for next summer but book early!

Lamb on the Spit is a way of entertaining as only known by very few mainly because it is thought to be very expensive ……. Not so!

We will do a lamb on the Spit for parties of between 30 and 50 people for just € 18.00 and € 15.00 a head respectively.

Together with the lamb we will treat you to a big pot of curried potatoes, a tomato/salsa salad as well as a choice between a pasta salad or three-bean salad. Garlic or bread rolls are included as well.
For venues more than 50 km from our home base in Keerbergen there is a small transport fee.

Start planning now for those special occasions! Just keep in mind that quite a number of dates up to September are already booked!
Remember that we are doing these functions only during weekends.

Booking early is essential and you can do so on
+32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.
(A Lamb on the Spit can only be done outside because we cook on coals!)


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Previous issues of our Newsletter top


You can click on the links below to view some of the previous issues of our newsletter.

May 2006
June 2006
July 2006
August 2006
September 2006
October 2006
November 2006
December 2006
Issue 1 – 2007
Issue 2 – 2007
Issue 3 – 2007
Issue 4 – 2007


Subscribing and Unsubscribing top


Perhaps you would like to subscribe to this newsletter or tell a friend about Biltongmakers.Com! and the incredible Biltong Makers!! You can be included in this newsletter by clicking on the following link.
Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

If you prefer not to receive email from us, you can unsubscribe from Biltongmakers.Com! by clicking on this link.
Unsubscribe me please.

July 2004

 

 

The home of Biltong, Boerewors, Potjiekos and much, much more!

The Biltongmakers.Com Newsletter July and August 2007

You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
If you do not wish to receive this newsletter you may unsubscribe at the bottom where you will find an automatic email link. Just click on that and send. Your name will then be permanently deleted from our database.

If you, your family or your friends want to subscribe to the newsletter please click on this link.

Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

In this Newsletter top
From the editor top


DISCLAIMER

The information and contributions contained in this newsletter are received from various readers local and international. Views and opinions reflected in our newsletter are not necessarily those of Biltongmakers.Com and its team members.

Keerbergen
Belgium

Henry watched from the shoreline at Portsmouth as the pride of his fleet turned to go into battle.
It was early in the morning on July 19th, 1545 when Henry VIII’s flagship, the Mary Rose went in to battle against the French Fleet, just off the shores of Portsmouth.

Then, as she turned, there was a sudden gust of wind or perhaps she turned too sharply taking on water through her port holes. Whatever the cause, as she turned, she capsized and sank!
With her almost the entire compliment of sailors, gunners and soldiers perished.

Nothing was ever seen of her again until ….

It was another quiet morning. It was October 11th, 1982. There was a large crowd gathered along the shore at Portsmouth and, as they looked out over the Solent, just like Henry VIII had done so many years ago, they were the first to see the Mary Rose rise from her watery grave where she had lain for almost 437 years!

Today she lies in a large hall, behind glass walls, at the historic dockyard in Portsmouth, constantly being sprayed with a solution that, it is hoped, will preserve her for ever.

That is where I saw her a couple of weeks ago.

Now, I am sure that most of us have heard about the Mary Rose. Some of us may remember the day she was brought back to the surface from the waters just of the shores of Portsmouth, that October day back in 1982.

But, nothing prepares one for the breathtaking and eerie beauty of what is left of her when you walk into that hall.

There is a deathly silence all around.

She is so delicate that, even though she is behind glass you cannot take flash photographs for fear of doing harm to her.

Looking at her lying there you are transported back to that day, almost 437 years ago, when she sunk. You can almost hear the gasps of the crowds on the shore and see the look of shock and credulity on the face of Henry VIII.

Whenever you have a chance you should go and see her. It is certainly worth the trip.

In the mean time, click here to read her story and see all the pictures!

Now, after this (to me at least) fascinating bit of history let’s get back to the present.

To me there is nothing better than the smell of a braai! I can just hang over the fire and inhale those incredible fumes and smells of wood burning and meat cooking.

When June and I are on our own we now use one of these “throwaway” little braais. They work like a charm for just two people and you don’t have the hassle of cleaning up afterwards!

The big advantage is that you can have a braai every single day providing you have a bit of good weather of course. And that is something we have not seen much of in Belgium this year so far.

Mind you, last weekend was great. Blazing sun with absolutely no wind and temperatures at the back of the house went up as high as 36C!!

We hope to get away towards the end of September for a couple of weeks. Apart from it being too busy at Biltongmakers.Com at the moment it will also be nice and quiet then in most holiday places because the schools will have started again.

I can’t stand full beaches.
I suppose that no-one who has experienced the solitude and pure joy of stretches of white beaches going on for miles and miles with only the occasional people around will never get used to being packed like sardines in a can like I have seen at some of the holiday resorts in Spain, France and Italy.

Anyway, until such time we’ll just have the occasional weekend away.

Next week Paris and the weekend after that the yearly Mussels fest at Yerseke in Holland. We went there last year and that was good fun.
Scores of people out on the mussels boats, loads of beer flowing and eat as many mussels as you can!

But more about that the next time.

Till then, take care,

Lo

“I have learnt my lesson, I asked God to make me a millionaire, but I forgot to state the currency!”
-Anonymous Zimbabwean citizen-

“You can’t have everything! Where would you put it?”
-Steven Wright-

Stand still for a moment… top


The Secret behind the number 11 – Pretty Chilling

Do yourself a favour and read this to the bottom.
Try it out. I did and I got goose bumps!
If you are a skeptical person – still read on as it’s actually very interesting!

This is actually really freaky!! (Mainly the end part, but read it first)

  • New York City has 11 letters
  • Afghanistan has 11 letters.
  • Ramsin Yuseb has 11 letters. (The terrorist who threatened to destroy the Twin Towers in 1993)
  • George W Bush has 11 letters.

This could be a mere coincidence, but this gets interesting

  • New York is the 11th state.
  • The first plane crashing against the Twin Towers was flight number 11.
  • Flight 11 was carrying 92 passengers – 9+2=11
  • Flight 77 which also hit Twin Towers, was carrying 65 passengers – 6+5=11
  • The tragedy was on September 11, or 9/11 as it is now known – 9+1+1=11
  • The date is equal to the US emergency services telephone number 911 – 9+1+1=11

Sheer coincidence? Read on and make up your own mind!

  • The total number of victims inside all the hi-jacked planes was 254 – 2+5+4=11
  • September 11 is day number 254 of the calendar year – 2+5+4=11
  • The Madrid bombing took place on 3/11/2004 – 3+1+1+2+4=11
  • The tragedy of Madrid happened 911 days after the Twin Towers incident.

Now this is where things get totally eerie

The most recognized symbol for the US, after the Stars & Stripes, is the Eagle. The following verse is taken from the Koran, the Islamic holy book:

“For it is written that a son of Arabia would awaken a fearsome Eagle. The wrath of the Eagle would be felt throughout the lands of Allah while some of the people trembled in despair still more rejoiced: for the wrath of the Eagle cleansed the lands of Allah and there was peace.”

That verse is number 9.11 of the Koran.

Unconvinced about all of this Still?

Try this and see how you feel afterwards, it made my hair stand on end.

  • Open Microsoft Word and do the following:
  • Type in capitals Q33 NY. This is the flight number of the first plane to hit one of the Twin Towers.
  • Highlight the Q33 NY.
  • Change the font size to 48.
  • Change the actual font to the WINGDINGS 1

What do you think now?!!

Story of the month top

You know what?

I have traveled the world and am always on the look-out for some really nice bacon and pork sausages to take back home.
We have scoured the shelves of most department stores in England from Marks and Spencers to Waitrose. We have been to butchers, we have tried it ourselves but never ever have I come across a pork sausage as nice as an ESKORT pork sausage.

And I promise you I did NOT get paid to say this!

Anyone who traveled the road from Johannesburg to Durban knows the ESKORT butcher there, next to the road between Johannesburg and Durban.

We have never traveled that road without stopping for a nice pork belly, some bacon and, of course, the famous pork sausages!

Well, ESKORT is 90 years old this year and I thought it worth a mention.

Certainly my Sunday mornings have never been the same without a rashers or two, or six of ESKORT bacon and some of their sausages.

Here is their story in short ……

In mid 1917 a group of nine people gathered in Estcourt, KwaZulu-Natal, to discuss the establishment of a Bacon curing factory in the area. By August 1917 the Farmer’s Co-operative Bacon Factory Limited was founded and building started on the banks of the Bushman’s River in Estcourt.

The factory was officially opened on 6 June 1918 by General Louis Botha. Thrupps of Johannesburg became one of the Co-operative’s first large clients to whom bacon was sold.

In June 1919 the S.S. Saxon carried the first Bacon exports to the United Kingdom which were excellently received by that market. In 1920 the fledgling Co-operative was awarded a Gold and Silver Medal from the British Dairy Farmers Association at the London Dairy Show (the acknowledged Bacon Show of the World).

That same year the manufacture of the now famous ESKORT Gold Medal Pork Sausages commenced and the Co-operatives’ continued marketing of excellent products were rewarded with the third successive wins in the Export Hams and Bacon categories at the 1922 Rand Easter Show.

Tragedy struck in 1925 when a fire caused extensive damage to the factory and production was temporarily relocated to Nel’s Rust Dairy Limited in Braamfontein, Johannesburg.

Despite the setback the Company gained the high honour of winning the top three prizes at the 1926 London Dairy Show.

During the Second World War over 1 million tins of sausages were supplied to the Allied forces all over the world and over 12 tonnes of bacon per week was supplied to convoys calling at Durban Harbour.

World War II Advert
“After having travelled 17,460 miles we still have to find bacon and pork sausages as good and as popular as ESTCOURT.”
Mr and Mrs Williams, S.A.World Walkers
 The Golden Jubilee Year of 1967 was celebrated with plans for additional expansion at both Estcourt and Heidelberg which was continued vigorously to see Eskort become the single largest brand in the South African Processed Meat Industry.
The Eskort range of product now extends to over 100 product lines and includes Bacon, Sausages, Viennas, Polonies, Ham, and Cold Meat Loaves.

Early in 1948 plans for a factory in Heidelberg, Gauteng were drawn up. This factory commenced production in September 1954.

The retail Eskort butchery, a favourite shopping stop for travelers between the Reef and Durban was opened in 1951.
In 1992 the Co-operative celebrated 75 years of marketing quality products to the South African and International Markets, as well as being recognised as a major leader in the development of a stable South African Pig Industry.

The Eskort product portfolio has recently been extended into the fresh pork market with products such as Spare Ribs, Bacon Cherry sticks, Marinated Rashers and Smoked Eisbein. Many of these products including Gammons are packed under the labels of South Africa’s leading retailers. Eskort is also a supplier to Wimpy, the historic Mount Nelson hotel in Cape Town and produces a range of products endorsed by Weigh-less.

Eskort is also actively involved in the local communities supporting the Shalom Children’s Ministries in Heidelberg, the Bhekuzulu Self Sufficient Project that cares for HIV sufferers, orphans and displaced children in the Estcourt community. Eskort is also the proud sponsor of the Eskort Cavanaugh Marathon. The staff complement at both Estcourt and Heidelberg is in excess of 600 people.

As Eskort prepares to celebrate ninety years of providing South Africans with a range of top quality nutritional products focus will remain firmly in ensuring that the needs of our consumers will be met in every way possible.

* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *


The South African Meat Industry Company,
Samic has very nice meat cutting charts.
Just click on the banner below for lots of interesting information.

Our Home Biltong Makers top

Nothing compares with out Home Biltong Makers ……

Our Home Biltong makers have given many of our customers much joy and happiness and have brought many of them a little of “South Africa back” in their homes.

It is so easy to make your own Biltong and it is ever so cost effective. In fact it only costs you just a fraction of the price you pay in the shop and, what is more important, you can make it just the way YOU like it.

Please read what these people had to say.

COMMENTS FROM BILTONG LOVERS AROUND THE WORLD!
Hi Lo,

My mother-in-law, Jenny Winters (an old customer of ours-Ed), brought me a Biltong Buddy last Christmas and I just wanted to say that it has not stood still for even one day!
I just wanted to say that my Biltong is perfect and it’s so easy to make!
Thanks again for a SUPERB machine!
Keep up the good work

Laurie Allsworth
Cape Town, South Africa (08-08-2007)
allsworth@telkomsa.net

      Hi Guys,
      I unveiled my first batch of biltong this evening and am so happy to tell you that it was a HUGE success.
      We had a couple of South Africans over for the “first taste test” and they all thought it was a good as the real stuff if not better!
      I am indebted to you for your help throughout the process. I am going to try various types of meat each time because no-one knows what “silverside” or “topside” is.
      In this first batch, I used “top sirloin” which I am told is from the hind quarter of the cow.
      Anyway, I am big hit with all my mates – that is all that counts!
      Cheers for now and thanks again.
      Dan Rankow

Jupiter, Florida, USA

      (28-07-2007)

danrankow@aol.com

      – Tel: +1 561-346-9900
      Hello Biltong Team!
      Well everything went great and my biltong turned out excellent!
      I work with a South African bloke so he had a try and reckoned it was “the real thing!”
      I’m up for the next lot now so I’m going to check out the recipes again and have a go at something different.
      Thanks again for sharing all your ideas and for all your help!
      Kind Regards
      Neil Webster

Brisbane, Australia

      (06-06-2007)

natandneil@bigpond.com

      Hi Biltong Guys!
      WOW ….. our first batch of biltong was great !!!!!
      We have a butcher here in Canada who had a shop in Toronto in a prominent South African area, so he started making wors and biltong, not bad, but not like ours!!
      He had since relocated to our area, much to our delight! To start of our Rockey’s 5kg BILTONG MAKER we made droëwors with his wors and the family consumed it in about four days.
      But when the biltong was ready from the Quick Biltong Recipe it was gone in two days! I had to hide a piece to give to my daughter in Miami, especially as she has shares in the Biltong Maker as my son’s Christmas present.
      Rockey’s Biltongmaker has a permanent place in the kitchen as is working all the time!!
      Thanks for keeping in touch with your News Letters, I do enjoy receiving them, as well as all the future Biltong we will be eating.
      Alles van die beste,
      Dawn Lyell

Coldwater, Ontario, Canada

      (05-03-2007)

alandawn70@yahoo.co.uk
And so, once again, more and more people keep on telling us how fantastic it is to make your own biltong! Just read about what people are saying (we only started keeping records in 2001) on our customers comments page.

So, to all of you who have not tried it yet, now is the time!

ESPECIALLY WITH A VERY NICE SPECIAL SURPRISE WE HAVE HIS MONTH! (SEE BELOW!)

You too could be making your own Biltong in a very short space of time.
Have a look at our Home Biltong Makers and see how easy it is!!

Details on ROCKEY’S 5kg Home Biltong Maker can be found by clicking on this link.

You can have a look at the BILTONG BUDDY here.

This month’s specials top

Special discounts for Special customers!!

Free with all Biltong Maker orders placed

  • 20 special Biltong storage bags
  • A packet of our famous Nice ‘n Spicy spices.

Click here to go to our on-line shop.

[These special offers are for a limited period only and can be changed without prior notice!]

Tips of the month top


What Vodka can do for you!

WHO WOULD OF THUNK IT

    • To remove a bandage painlessly, saturate the bandage with vodka. The solvent dissolves the adhesive.
    • To clean the caulking around bathtubs and showers, fill a trigger-spray bottle with vodka, spray the caulking, let set 5 minutes and wash clean. The alcohol in the vodka kills mold and mildew.
    • To clean your eyeglasses, simply wipe the lenses with a soft, clean cloth dampened with vodka. The alcohol in the vodka cleans the glass and kills germs.
    • Prolong the life of razors by filling a cup with vodka and letting your safety razor blade soak in the alcohol after shaving. The vodka disinfects the blade and prevents rusting.
    • Spray vodka on vomit stains, scrub with a brush, then blot dry.
    • Using a cotton ball, apply vodka to your face as an astringent to cleanse the skin and tighten pores.
    • Add a splash of vodka to a 12-ounce bottle of shampoo.
    • The alcohol cleanses the scalp, removes toxins from hair and stimulates the growth of healthy hair.
    • Fill a 16-ounce trigger-spray bottle and spray bees or wasps to kill them.
    • Pour 1/2 cup vodka and 1/2 cup water in a freezer bag and freeze for a slushy, reusable ice pack for aches, pain or black eyes…
    • Fill a clean, empty jar with freshly packed lavender flowers. Fill the jar with vodka, seal the lid tightly, and set it in the sun for 3 days. Strain liquid, then apply the tincture to aches and pains.
    • Make your own mouthwash by mixing 9 tablespoons powered cinnamon with 1 cup vodka. Seal in an airtight container for 2 weeks. Strain through a coffee filter.
    • Mix with warm water and rinse your mouth. (DON’T SWALLOW!)
    • Using a cotton swab, apply vodka to a cold sore to help it dry out.
    • If blister opens, pour vodka over the raw skin as a local anesthetics that also disinfects the exposed dermis.
    • To treat dandruff, mix 1 cup vodka with 2 teaspoons crushed rosemary. Let sit 2 days, strain through a coffee filter, massage into your scalp and dry.
    • To treat an earache, put a few drops of vodka in your ear. Let sit for a few minutes, then drain. Vodka will kill the bacteria causing pain in your ear.
    • To relieve a fever, use a washcloth to rub vodka on your chest and back as a liniment.
    • To cure foot odor, wash your feet with vodka.
    • Vodka will disinfect and alleviate a jellyfish sting.
    • Pour vodka over an area affected with poison ivy to remove the urushiol oil from your skin.
    • Swish a shot of vodka over an aching tooth. Allow your gums to absorb some of the alcohol to numb the pain.
      And, my personal favorite …

If all else fails, just turn the bottle upside-down and drink it. Then nothing else will matter anyway!Anyway keep up the good work!
Kind regards

Graham Ferreira
Mallorca

(Thank you Graham – I’m gonna try all of them! – Ed)

Our spices are kosher

It will certainly interest our Jewish readers that our biltong spices are certified as being kosher by the Beth Din of Johannesburg. Anyone interested can mail us for a copy of the certification. (new 2007 certification are now available)

South African Meat Cutting Charts


Below you will find three excellent meat cutting charts.

These are displayed with the compliments of SAMIC.
(The South African Meat Industry Company).
SAMIC has a very interesting web site as well as a weekly newsletter about anything to do with the
Meat Industry in South Africa.
Now, don’t think this is a totally boring web site (I thought so first) but it has some very interesting articles and statistics.

Beef Cutting Chart Pork Cutting Chart Lamb Cutting Chart
* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *

Welcome to Apartment Oberholzer in Vienna, Austria
Our charming Viennese building will make you feel right at home. As our guests’ well-being is a matter close to our hearts, the quiet residence offers every convenience from a microwave, dishwasher and washing machine to Satellite TV.

The Vienna city center is within 10 minutes walking distance. Public transport is right at the Guest house.

Our well-kept, 54 m² newly renovated non-smoking holiday flat is suitable for 1-4 people. It is central, quiet, charming and very reasonably priced.

For further information please see our website www.netland.at/wien/oberholzer

Questions and Answers top

Like every month, here is our regular section on the many questions we receive from our readers all over the world.
If we have not given an answer and you can help these people could you please mail them?
(Please copy us in on your mails @ info@biltongmakers.com
so we can help other people who might have the same questions in the future)

QUESTION

Hi Guys,

I now live in New Zealand – love this newsletter – and long for a good melktert!
Please can someone send me their ‘ultimate” recipe and any other Good ‘ol Afrikaans cake/biscuit recipes.
Love to our homeland,

Moira Cochrane
New Zealand
cochranedm@xtra.co.nz

Good Morning!

Please could you find out for me the correct way to make chicken stixs. I have a little biltong shop in PE and customers always ask me for chicken stixs.
I have a biltong dryer.
Thanks

Margaret Goodwin
Port Elizabeth, South Africa
margie4@telkomsa.net

QUESTION

Thanks for a great website!
I note that your recipes do not include saltpeter while many others do.
What is saltpeter used for in biltong? What are your views?
Groete from London

Lionel
London, England
Lionel@ljcc.org.uk

QUESTION

I would like to know if giraffe biltong is any good.

Barney
South Africa
andries@demacoengineering.co.za

QUESTION

Enige wilds resepte vir wors en droëwors sal waardeer word.

Tony de Beer
South Africa
swemco@telkomsa.net

QUESTION

I was wondering if you had a cheese wors recipe

Kevin Hayes
United Kingdom
kevinhayes460@btinternet.com

Stoep Talk top

When reminiscence rears its nostalgic head …
By James Clarke

I try not to reminisce too often in this column for fear of boring the children. But sometimes I can’t help it. Like today when I received via Stella Nosic, formerly of Johannesburg, now living in Toronto, a cascade of nostalgia from South Africans living there.

Another ex-Johannesburger in Canada, Barbara Durlacher, apparently instigated the flurry of e-mails about “old Joeys” from South Africans living in Canada.

The reminiscences are, unfortunately, distinctly white-orientated, and it would be an interesting exercise to collate some black-orientated memories of yesterday’s Johannesburg.

The Canadian list includes:

  • Houses with corrugated iron roofs that increased the winter cold and the summer’s heat.
  • The butcher and the grocer calling for orders.
  • Nelsrust Dairies and the daily deliveries.
  • Rinsing off the cardboard milk caps.
  • The tinkle of the ice-cream guy with his bike – tuppeny lollies.
  • Newtown Market – the auctioneer’s rapid-fire sales and the horse-drawn carts waiting for loads.
  • Sandown’s gentle country life with its stables and horses. Quiet walks in Illovo along sandy, tree-lined roads.
  • Miles of golden grasslands between Joburg and Pretoria.
  • A migrant worker playing a homesick tune on a mbira (finger piano).
  • Eric Egan and early morning “physical jerks”.
  • Wonderful “English” radio serials. Remember the Man in Black?
  • Esme Euvrard, Springbok and Lourenço Marques radio stations.
  • Chanting gangs of labourers digging trenches.
  • Hand-cranked phones and a “party-line”.
  • Stinkwood and Imbuia “ball-and-claw” furniture.
  • Cosmopolitan Hillbrow; cosy Café Kranzler and Viennese coffee and its newspapers on sticks.
  • The designs and colours of Basotho blankets worn by homebound miners walking to Park Station led by an Induna … marching to a song of home, carrying sewing machines, paraffin lamps and Primus stoves.
  • Park Station and the “Blue Room” restaurant.
  • Knitting socks, balaclavas and scarves for the troops.
  • General and Isie Smuts and the “Little Man” lapel pin.
  • The original Wanderers Stadium near Park Station.
  • Cream and red trams and trolley buses – an agile conductor in navy uniform and cap with his silver coin holder, bundle of tickets and hand-punch. Delays while he hooked the electric unit back on the overhead wires with a long bamboo pole hidden underneath the bus.
  • The scent of “Evening in Paris” at your first dance – Lisle stocking, nylons …
  • C-to-C (Cape-to-Cairo) cigarettes – a shilling (1/-) for 30.
  • A penny, a tickey, a shilling (a bob), a half-crown, a florin and a guinea.
  • The Rand Daily Mail.
  • Pink penny stamps with a picture of Britannia – ha-penny if the envelope was open; same-day telegrams – penny a word!
  • Tea-room “bios” with their continuous performances.
  • The Dolls House at midnight, and a double-thick chocolate malt.
  • Eloff Street trams; elegant shops full of imported clothes, handbags and shoes, milliners; Saturday shopping and white-gloved lift-girls: “Going Up!”

And that’s only a fifth of the list Barbara compiled!

(If you get to read this Barbara, please send us some more – magic! – Ed)

Recipe Corner top


Three lovely recipes!

Last month we had a Neck of Mutton Potjie. In this section you will find a recipe for the Pot Bread you serve with the mutton.

But first ….

Dave’s Boerewors Burgers

Dave writes …

I was passing through South Africa in 1979 with the Transglobe Expedition on my way to the Antarctic.
I suffered a bad accident, breaking my leg in many places, and had to stay in Capetown for 8 months.
During my stay I came to love some South African staples, including Boerewors.
I have NOW adapted the recipe to the Canadian way of life and make “Boereworsburgers”

This is what you need …

  • 1¼ lbs lean ground beef
  • 1¼ lbs ground pork
  • ¼ lb pork fat, chopped finely
  • 1 tsp salt
  • ½ tsp fresh ground mixed pepper
  • 1 Tbsp roasted ground coriander
  • ¼ tsp grated nutmeg
  • 1/8 tsp ground cloves
  • ¼ tsp ground dried thyme
  • ¼ tsp ground allspice
  • 2 Tbsp malt vinegar
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 1½ Tbsp Worcestershire sauce

And this is what you do …

  • Mix all together, form into 6-oz burger patties.
  • Cook gently on a barbecue at medium heat.
  • Do not overcook or else they will become too dry.

I have just discovered a new store here in Victoria, British Columbia that is owned by a South African and imports a lot of South African produce. He also makes his own Boerwors, droewors and biltong.
The store is called “Aubergine Fine Produce & Specialty Foods” at 2579 Cadboro Bay Road, Victoria, B.C., Canada
Love your website!
Cheers

Dave Peck
Victoria, B.C., Canada

Potbroodwiele

Hierdie potbroodwiele word gemaak van gekoopte brooddeeg wat per kg by die meeste winkels se bakkerye beskikbaar is.

Uit die spens:

  • 1 kg brooddeeg
  • Tamatiepuree na smaak OF blikkie tamatie-en-uiesmoor
  • 1 pakkie bruinuiesoppoeier
  • Knoffel
  • 1 blikkie mossels OF weense worsies (in skyfies gesny) OF gebraaide spekvleis gerasperde cheddarkaas
  • 250ml room

So maak mens:

  • Rol deeg in reghoek en smeer tamatie oor
  • Sprinkel soppoeier en knoffel oor
  • Versprei vleis van jou keuse (mossels of worsies of spek) en kaas oor en rol dit op soos ‘n rolkoek
  • Sny in skywe, plaas in gesmeerde oondpan, gooi room oor en bak vir 45 min teen 180°C
  • Of plaas in swart platboompot en bak in buite-oond (gat in grond met kole om of op ‘n rooster met ‘n omgekeerde appelboks oorgetrek met foelie).

Jy vreet jou vingers af.

Nardus van der Merwe

Mieliebrood

Hi daar!

Dit is ‘n mieliebrood resep wat ek by my ma gekry het, ek het dit altyd by die huis gebak, maar toe gaan kamp ons en ek probeer dit, en ja dit is lekkerder om die kampvuur met lekker plaasbotter en korrelkonfyt …

Bestanddele:

  • 500g bruismeel
  • 1/2 teelepel sout
  • 1 koppie melk
  • 2 eiers
  • 1 blikkie geroomde suikermielies 410g
  • Bietjie pietersielie en paprika vir versiering
  • 1 koppie kaas (strooi bo-oor deegmengsel)

Metode:

  • Smeer die platboom pot goed in met olie sowel as die deksel
  • Meng nou al die bestanddele saam en gooi in swartboompot
  • Dit bak omtrent vir 1 uur oor lae hitte, hou maar net dop.
  • Indien verkies kan ‘n mens groen rissies, bacon, uie, of feta kaas meng voor jy bak.

Elsabe van Zyl

Vetkoek in Skottelbraai

Uit die spens:

  • 2 koppies koekmeel
  • 40ml suiker
  • 10ml bakpoeier
  • knippie sout
  • 2ml gemengde speserye
  • 2ml kaneel
  • 1ml gemaalde naaltjies
  • 2 ekstra groot eiers (geklits)
  • 250ml kookwater
  • 30g rosyne of korente
  • olie vir diepbraai

So maak mens:

  • Sif droë bestanddele saam
  • Klits eiers en meng met kookwater
  • Meng droë bestanddele geleidelik in totdat gladde deeg verkry is
  • Roer die rosyne by
  • Verhit olie in die CADAC skottelbraai en braai 3 tot 4 lepelsvol beslag in warm olie tot poffering en goudbruin
  • Draai om en braai anderkant ook liggies
  • Verwyder van olie en dreineer op kombuispapier
  • Bedien warm

(Lewer omtrent 15 vetkoekies)

Marlene Badenhorst

Click below for our handy cooking converter

News from South Africa top

Britain bans biltong
22-06-2007

Johannesburg

The habit of packing some biltong in your suitcase as a gift for homesick friends and family in the UK will have to stop, if the British government has its way, The Star reported on Friday.

Many a concerned mother has sent a package of South African goodies, inevitably including some biltong and dry wors, to London. South Africans who live and work in the UK generally stock their bags with local favourites during visits home.

But UK customs want to put a stop to this. They have launched a media campaign to warn visitors that it is illegal to bring meat and animal products into the UK and that those who do get caught could be fined up to £1 000 (about R14 000) or even be liable for prosecution.

“They actually have ‘meat patrols’ when flights from South Africa arrive at Heathrow,” says Will Boscawen, who is helping to run the “If In Doubt – Leave It Out” marketing campaign for Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs.
Other countries specifically targeted are Nigeria, Ghana, Bangladesh and China.

Boscawen said many South Africans believed they could take biltong if it was vacuum-packed, but all meat products are banned. “The UK, being an island, has to be sensitive about possible pests that could be brought into the country via food parcels,” he said.

Crime News Update
May 2007

By: Lugisani Mulaudzi
MulaudziL@johncom.co.za

Please keep the following in mind and NEVER think you are safe!

Palisade fencing
A normal car jack is being used to open and thus separate the vertical bars on palisade fencing thus allowing criminals to walk through fencing and remove objects or prepare cars for hijacking.

Electric fencing It’s simple. Take a length of wood with two nails attached, push it through two wires, and voila, the current is re-directed causing no harm to the criminal but does in fact damage and disable your electric fence which inevitably still costs you in repairs. Another method of deactivation is by jumper cables.
Simply redirect current and the result is – No alarm.
Sadly in so many instances where people have electric fencing, they don’t even activate the fences. The criminals know this.

To disable a motorized gate
Simply pour petrol over it and set alight. This allows for the gate to be moved open without too much difficulty and don’t be surprised at how easily your car was removed.

The best part is this
The very latest trend is to place a burning CD in an open window of a home. The toxic fumes serve to drug the inhabitants.
The effects are very deep sleep to awaken a few hours later, feeling very drowsy. Whilst asleep, the criminals have free access and reign to everything in your home.
The terrifying part is that you cannot even protect yourself. You simply go to sleep

It is important that we know how these crimes are committed. Remember crime is very big business in South Africa Forewarned is forearmed.

The latest hijack hotspots in Johannesburg and Pretoria as supplied by eBlockwatch and SAPS are:

Johannesburg:

  1. The William Nicol Drive offramp from the N1 from the Sandton side.
  2. The corner of Old Pretoria Road and 1st Avenue in Alexandra.
  3. New Road offramp in Midrand.
  4. Riviera Road offramp near Killarney Mall.
  5. Intersection of Christiaan de Wet Road and Wilgerood Road in
  6. Roodepoort.
  7. All the traffic lights along Louis Botha Avenue between Alexandra
  8. and Hillbrow.
  9. Parkwood and Saxonwold (Rosebank precinct).
  10. Upper Houghton and Killarney (Hillbrow precinct).
  11. Between 10th and 11th avenues and 4th and 7th avenues in Parkhurst
  12. (Parkview precinct).
  13. Glenhazel, Lombardy East and Sandringham (Sandringham precinct).
  14. Orange Grove and Highlands North (Norwood precinct).
  15. Yeoville, Bellevue and Bellevue East (Yeoville precinct).
  16. Wynberg, Bramley, Marlboro and Kew (Bramley precinct).

Pretoria:

  1. The Atterbury Road offramp from the N1 in Menlyn.
  2. Lynnwood Road offramp on the N1.
  3. John Vorster Drive offramp from the N1 in Lyttelton.
  4. Jean Avenue offramp from the R28 in Centurion.
  5. Rigel Avenue offramp from the N1 in Erasmuskloof.
  6. Corner of University Road and Lynnwood Road in Hatfield.
  7. The traffic lights along Walker Street in Sunnyside.
  8. The Lynnwood Road and Hans Strijdom Drive intersection in
  9. Garsfontein.
  10. The traffic lights along Nelson Mandela Drive in Sunnyside.
  11. The traffic lights along Simon Vermooten Road in Silverton.
  12. Along Beyers Naude Drive and Paul Kruger Street in Wonderboompoort.
  13. Nelson Mandela Drive, Duncan Street and Walker Street in Sunnyside.
  14. The R55 in Erasmia.
  15. Burnett Street, Hilda Street and the Atterbury Road offramp in the
  16. Brooklyn area.
  17. Delfi Avenue and Garsfontein Road in Garsfontein.

Please be very careful when traveling alone!

A woman was pushed off the road on Saturday at 10:00 am on Parkland drive in Esther Park road. A white taxi full of men followed her for about 5 minutes and then moved in next to her car and slowly pushed her towards the pavement.
They kept on until a couple of other cars started to drive around her, and then left.

This morning another lady stopped at a traffic light on Jan Smuts Avenue Kempton Park.
A taxi stopped next to her and five guys jumped out of the taxi. One banged on the roof of her car, two tried to open the front doors, a third jumped onto the bonnet of her car and a fourth stood in front of her car.
She got such a fright that she pulled away knocking the chap in front of her down and crossed the red robot.

It seems that this is a new type of intimidation, victimizing mainly women drivers.
Please be very careful when driving on your own. This is the 11th case we’ve heard of since last week. A single woman traveling from Boksburg stopped at a robot and was pulled from her car and raped repeatedly by 4 men in a taxi and another 2 at the Modderfontein intersection.
Please pass this on – not only to females – but to everyone – be alert.

Another favourite way to hijack you is by bumping you softly and as you get out the car to see what had happened they hijack you!

PLEASE BE CAREFUL!

Managing Director Guard Force International

Around the World top

Bits and Bobs from people around the world

Zimbabwean ISPs* to spy on users
07 August 2007

Johannesburg
– Media watchdog Reporters Without Borders (RSF) have slammed Zimbabwe for passing a controversial law allowing the government to monitor phone calls, faxes and emails.

“Zimbabwe had already given itself one of the world’s most repressive legislative arsenals as regards press freedom. Now all forms of communication have been placed under surveillance,” the Paris-based body said in a statement.

“RSF regrets that the Interception of Communications Act was finally signed into law by President Robert Mugabe on 3 August. The promulgation of this law is further evidence of Mugabe’s desire to keep news and information under close control.”

The law provides for the setting up of an interception centre to listen into telephone conversations, open mail and intercept emails and faxes.

ISP’s do the dirty work

The law also compels Internet service providers to install equipment to facilitate interception “at all times or when so required” and ensure that its equipment allows full-time monitoring of communications.

“A service provider who fails to give assistance in terms of this section shall be guilty of an offence and liable to a fine… or to imprisonment for a period not exceeding three years or to both,” reads part of the new law.

The law came under a barrage of criticism while it was still being debated, with media groups saying it was a major step backwards.

The government in Harare defended the new law saying it was necessary to protect the country from international terrorism and espionage

*Internet Service Providers

The following was sent to us by Meryl Roets from Belgium. Meryl is a regular contributor to our newsletter. Meryl had a small spine operation earlier in the year. We hope you are feeling much better now Meryl!

SOUTH AFRICA BULLETIN

from the headquarters of
TAU SA in Pretoria
Web: www.tlu.co.za
Tel.: + 27 12 804 8031 — Fax: + 27 12 804 2014 — E-mail:info@tlu.co.za

 The Bulletin attached hereto is provided as a means to inform stakeholders of agricultural developments in South Africa. These Bulletins are distributed every two weeks and can also be found on TAU SA’s website at www.tlu.co.za.

TAU SA is the oldest agricultural union in South Africa and has been in existence since 1897. The mission of the union is to ensure a productive and safe existence for its members on the land they own. Current reality in South Africa indicates that this is not possible at the moment due to a variety of actions and threats against commercial farmers.

Your comment regarding the Bulletins and other information provided to you is valuable and will be appreciated. However should you prefer not to receive information from TAU SA, please respond by e-mail to info@tlu.co.za.

 

HAS THE PENNY FINALLY DROPPED?
It is of some relief to many South Africans that the blinkers are now gone vis a vis the realities of the new South Africa. Until recently this has been a country of pretence, both within and outside our borders.
But even the most valiant supporters of democracy are now disillusioned – overseas television and media which soft-soaped the country’s peccadillos and glorified the burgeoning of what was hoped would be the African continent’s shining light have now turned.
South Africa was to be the country that proved the Afro-pessimists wrong, but expectations have been turned on their head.

Things started to wobble a while back – foreign governments warned of crime as tourists were killed and mugged, corruption reared its ubiquitous head, the Black Economic Empowerment syndrome curtailed foreign investment, and the collapse of the police force, the swamping of our cities by millions of aliens, and a general discernment that South Africa’s looming modus vivendi was not to be that much different from the rest of the continent became an undeniable reality, even among the most ardent believers in the new dispensation …

The gloves have come off, both here and abroad.
Britain’s Sky News’ recent program on crime in South Africa pulled no punches – there were no excuses, no “legacies of apartheid”, just a brutal look at a country from which much was expected, and from which little has emanated except decay and decline.
The BBC’s John Simpson’s report on crime in South Africa so enraged the ANC that they used the racist card to refute Simpson’s report.
The most prominent TV network in the Arab world, Al Jazeera, recently presented a one-hour English-language programme on crime in South Africa where no quarter was given to the SA government.
To cap it all, CNN’s Africa representative Jeff Koinange and his pregnant wife were held up and mugged outside their offices in Johannesburg. Within half an hour, a shaken Mr Koinange was on the air to millions of CNN viewers throughout the world, reporting on his ordeal.

A July 2006 report by British insurance company Norwich Union, in which the company investigated traffic accidents, food poisoning, violent crime, theft and lost baggage across the world, rated South Africa number one in the categories violent crime and lost baggage, and fifth in the category food poisoning
. The list was compiled after examining 60 000 claims submitted by British tourists in 2005.

Crime has become a catalyst – it has focused and concentrated a rising anger and frustration at the ANC government’s gross incompetence, arrogance and lack of accountability. Celebrity murders have riveted South Africa. The cold-blooded shooting of world famous naturalist and historian David Rattray shocked people around the world, including the Prince of Wales, a personal friend. Local singers, actors, businessmen and ordinary people have gathered to protest.
Letters in their hundreds of thousands were sent to the President who, with a certain degree of disdain, agreed to look into the crime situation, at the same time dismissively accusing those who complained of being Pharisees.

HONEYMOON
The world’s honeymoon with South Africa is over. The new South Africa, warts and all, is anything but pleasant.
Many of those who hoodwinked the world for so long as revolutionaries “fighting for their people” are now shown to have feet of clay – they are venal and corrupt, uncaring about the masses they purport to represent, while sneering at those who dare to criticize, those who pay their very generous salaries.

The rose-coloured glasses have disappeared, and the crime travesty is worsened by the apparent lack of shame and culpability. The attitude that whatever we do, we’ll be in power forever is manifest in, for example, the behaviour of our police chief who rides around in a stolen 4 x 4 vehicle, by the rousing send-off to jail given by ANC big wigs and ministers to convicted MP Tony Yengeni, and the couldn’t-care-less attitude to the breaking of his parole rules.
The fact that police commissioner Selebi was given the post of Interpol head reveals how unrealistically the international community viewed South Africa’s new rulers.

A serious defect in the country’s overseas image has been the brazen crimes committed against foreign government representatives in South Africa.
The US ambassador to South Africa said in November 2006 that crime could abort SA’s holding the 2010 FIFA World Cup games. The Iranian embassy has been hit six times. In one instance, a gun was forced into the mouth of an official. The safe was broken, cash stolen and personnel assaulted.
The German ambassador reported that some German tour operators who had come to SA to arrange world cup tours were mugged. During January 2007 alone, the Gabon embassy was robbed by armed men, a Greek embassy official was robbed at gun point, the Pakistani embassy was broken into, and a US embassy employee was attacked with a spanner and severely injured at his house.
On the same day, there was an attempted robbery at the Saudi embassy. In October and November last year, the Bangladeshi embassy was broken into three times in three weeks.

Ironically, while President Mbeki was very publicly welcoming the Chinese president in Pretoria this month, a huge wall was being constructed at the Chinese ambassador’s residence in Waterkloof because of a recent robbery at the house.

KLEPTOCRACY
Not only violent crime upsets South Africa’s citizens. The wholesale plunder of the country’s resources is under way by public officials. South Africa has become a kleptocracy to match even the most brazen of Africa’s poachers. It will take longer to bankrupt South Africa because there’s more here to steal.
Lavish overseas trips for government bigwigs and their friends and relatives are commonplace, and the culture of entitlement permeates virtually every facet of public life.
Nepotism is rampant but what adds salt to the wound is a clear lack of shame and an attitude of contemptuousness with which criticism is dismissed as racist and/or whingeing.

Because violent crime is rampant, citizens must protect themselves. Internet circulars tell us of the latest hijacking trick – spraying acid into a driver’s face. We are urged to cooperate with the police. We are warned at street crossings about hi-jack and robbery hot spots. We are forming self-help groups, residents’ associations, concerned taxpayers’ organizations.
We have to – the government cannot protect us. They will not release statistics, which are now obtained from insurance companies.

The monthly average of cash in transit robberies increased to 27 for the first half of 2005. Armed supermarket robberies are easy money for the gangs who storm these stores. South Africa has one of the highest homicide rates in the world – 51 murders per 100 000 people in 2003 (possibly higher now) compared to 4,6 persons in the United States, India’s 3,7 and China’s 2,1. Nigeria reported only 1,5 murders per 100 000 people in 1994, while Egypt’s figure stood at 0,4 for the same year.

Serious crime has moved into the urban areas – it has been endemic within the commercial farming sector for years. SA’s farmers are the most murdered group anywhere in the world outside a war zone.

Businesses that backed the ANC before they came to power are now spending millions on newspaper ads calling for the government to stop crime. It’s a bit late.
And the human capital necessary to curtail crime – what the government euphemistically calls “capacity” – is simply not there.
Adding more policemen is more of the same. Experienced and dedicated police personnel have left the service in droves. They simply cannot take the incompetence and corruption, and they are sick of doing the work while someone else less qualified gets promoted.
This is what they tell us, and this is what they tell anyone who will listen.

The only real solution is self-protection, and this is a business which has grown exponentially as crime exploded.
Farmers have cooperated on security measures for years. Now urban dwellers will have to do the same. Not to do so would open the gates to anarchy which, given the government’s current attempts to curb crime, is just out there, looking for the loopholes.
How the government could even think of guaranteeing the safety of half a million foreign visitors in 2010 is beyond comprehension.

If you have read this far, then maybe you are left wondering too!
Do we put on the blinkers and pretend it isn’t happening or are we going to fight back and stop this crap from going any further?

This is my home, I’m not leaving!

Chris.

Something to smile about top

Sex education!


The following is an actual extract from a sex education school textbook for girl, printed in the early 60’s in the UK and written by a woman!
When retiring to the bedroom, prepare yourself for bed as promptly as possible.
Whilst feminine hygiene is of the utmost importance, your tired husband does not want to queue for the bathroom, as he would have to for his train. But remember to look your best when going to bed.

Try to achieve a look that is welcoming without being obvious.
If you need to apply a face cream or hair rollers wait until he is asleep as this can be shocking to a man last thing at night.
When it comes to the possibility of intimate relations with your husband it is important to remember you marriage vows and in particular your commitment to obey him.

I he feels he needs to sleep immediately then so be it. In all things in bed be led by your husband’s wishes; do not pressure him in any way to stimulate intimacy.

Should your husband suggest congress then agree humbly all the while being mindful that a man’s satisfaction is more important than a woman’s!
When he reached his moment of fulfillment a small moan from yourself is encouraging to him and quite sufficient to indicate any enjoyment that you may have had.

Should your husband suggest any of the more unusual practices, be obedient and uncomplaining but register any reluctance by remaining silent.
It is likely that your husband will then fall promptly asleep so adjust your clothing, freshen up and apply your night time face and hair care products.

You may then set the alarm so that you can arise shortly before him in the morning.
This will enable you to have his morning cup of tea ready when he awakes!

Wrong spelling!
A young monk arrives at the monastery

He is assigned to helping the other monks in copying the old canons and laws of the church by hand.

He notices, however, that all of the monks are copying from copies, not from the original manuscript.
So, the new monk goes to the head abbot to question this, pointing out that if someone made even a small error in the first copy, it would never be picked up! In fact, that error would be continued in all of the subsequent copies.

The head monk, says, “We have been copying from the copies for centuries, but you make a good point, my son.” He goes down into the dark caves underneath the monastery where the original manuscripts are held as archives in a locked vault that hasn’t been opened for hundreds of years. Hours go by and nobody sees the old abbot.

So, the young monk gets worried and goes down to look for him. He sees him banging his head against the wall and wailing,

“We missed the “R”, we missed the “R” !”

His forehead is all bloody and bruised and he is crying uncontrollably.

The young monk asks the old abbot, “What’s wrong, father?”

With A choking voice, the old abbot replies,

“The word was CELEBRATE.” –>

Sport talk top

Snippets from the papers

Saru bans overseas-based Boks
The country’s leading rugby players have been dealt a heavy blow after Saru decided that players basing themselves abroad would no longer be eligible for the national team.
Full Story …

‘Black doesn’t equal coloured’
Saru’s Deputy President Mike Stofile believes more than seven players of colour should be included in the Springbok line-up by the 2011 World Cup.
Full Story …

Seven blacks in 2011 Bok XV
South African rugby has set a target of at least seven players of colour in the Springbok starting XV in the 2011 Rugby World Cup.
Full Story …

Jake blows the whistle on French referee
Springbok coach Jake White eagerly watched England’s World Cup dress-rehearsal match against Wales – and has now emailed a list of concerns about refereeing to the IRB.
Full Story …

SA women cricket team take Netherlands to the cleaners
The South African women’s cricket team has beaten the Netherlands three matches in a row – and Johmari Logtenberg used the occasion to make the sixth-best score of all time in women’s cricket.
Full Story …

-How to watch all the World Cup games-
Click here to find out!

Let’s hear from you too!! top

Let’s make the next issue a Bumper one!

Our regular readers may have noticed that I have gone from a monthly issue to a bi-monthly one. The reason is simple. It is impossible to do a newsletter of this size on my own.

We need regular input from our readers.

You are probably sitting at the computer right now so how about it. Let our readers enjoy your story!
It does not have to be about Biltong or such. We’d love to hear where you live and how you have adapted yourself to your new life style and surroundings.

You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask?
Perhaps you have some advice to give?

You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Share it with other people around the world!

Click right here to start now or you can mail us at webmaster@biltongmakers.com

Boerewors in Europe top


Boerewors (Europe only, sorry people!)

Still getting up at all hours to make wors. Perhaps I should have become a butcher! And still we can hardly keep up.
It is disappearing faster than we can make it! Nevertheless, we have fresh stock available all the time.

So if you need Boerewors just email us or call. You can either collect or we can mail it to you.
All our customers in Holland, Belgium and in fact, all over Europe are raving about the packing of and the condition in which the wors arrived at their doorsteps.

Just imagine some “lekker” pap and wors with a nice tomato and onion sauce!

Just give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.

Our Boerewors is vacuum packed in quantities of about 500 gram.
The normal price is € 8.45 per kg but for the time being we will keep it at only € 8.45 € 7.95 per kg!!

You can also place your order by simply clicking here.

Now also available at – STONEMANOR – The British Store – in Everberg, Belgium
Telephone 02 759-4979


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Droëwors for the UK and Europe! top


Droëwors …… a typical South African delicacy all of its own!

Droëwors, as it is known in South Africa, is as much part of the country’s culinary culture as Biltong, Pap, Boerewors and Potjiekos.
The spices are of course imported especially from South Africa so you will get the “real” thing!

Fresh droëwors is available right now and we normally have ample stock.

The price is € 40.00 € 30.00 per kilogram vacuum pack or € 4.00 € 3.50 per 100 gram packet.

Droëwors (like biltong) travels well and posting is an ideal option.
We can mail it to you anywhere in the world via priority mail in minimum quantities of 500 gram.
You can place your order now by going to www.boerewors.be

Interested? Give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25 or email.

 

We are not responsible for packets confiscated by customs in your country.

Now also available at

STONEMANOR – The British Store – in Everberg, Belgium
Telephone 02 759-4979
+++++++++
DE WIJN KRAAL – The South African Wine Specialist Store – in Leuven, Belgium.
Telephone 016 58.46.06
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Biltong for all our readers! top


Biltong …… once hooked you’re a slave forever!

Biltong is without doubt the snack most associated with South Africa!
It is so much part of South African culture that there is no food related shop that will not stock it. You find it literally anywhere.
Say Biltong and you say South Africa!

Biltongmakers.Com has for more than 12 years supplied their Home Biltong Makers to the South African expat so they could make their own biltong away from home.

We were often asked why we don’t make Biltong ourselves and then make it available to the poor and deprived ex-South Africans!
The requests have been relentless and constant so we decided to give it a go on a temporary basis. Just to see how well it would sell.

So, from now you will be able to get your biltong directly from us.
The spices are of course imported from South Africa so you will get the “real” taste like “back home”!

The INTRODUCTORY price is € 3.50 per 100 gram packet.

Biltong travels well and posting is an ideal option.
We can mail it to you anywhere in the world via priority mail.

To place your order please email us at info@biltongmakers.be or call us on +32 (16) 53.96.25

We will then get back to you with how much the postage will be.

We are not responsible for packets confiscated by customs in your country.

Now also available at

STONEMANOR – The British Store – in Everberg, Belgium
Telephone 02 759-4979
+++++++++
DE WIJN KRAAL – The South African Wine Specialist Store – in Leuven, Belgium.
Telephone 016 58.46.06
top

Lamb on the Spit top


Lamb on the Spit ……. something special!

Summer is in full swing (you could have fooled some us here in Belgium) and we have several spit braais under our belt this year.

Lamb on the Spit is a way of entertaining as only known by very few mainly because it is thought to be very expensive ……. Not so!

We will do a lamb on the Spit for parties of between 30 and 50 people for just € 18.00 and € 15.00 a head respectively.

Together with the lamb we will treat you to a big pot of curried potatoes, a tomato/salsa salad as well as a choice between a pasta salad or three-bean salad. Garlic or bread rolls are included as well.
For venues more than 50 km from our home base in Keerbergen there is a small transport fee.

Start planning now for those special occasions! Just keep in mind that quite a number of dates up to September are already booked!
Remember that we are doing these functions only during weekends.

Booking early is essential and you can do so on
+32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.
(A Lamb on the Spit can only be done outside because we cook on coals!)


top

Previous issues of our Newsletter top


You can click on the links below to view some of the previous issues of our newsletter.

August 2006
September 2006
October 2006
November 2006
December 2006
January/February 2007
March/April 2007
May/June 2007
Subscribing and Unsubscribing top

Perhaps you would like to subscribe to this newsletter or tell a friend about Biltongmakers.Com! and the incredible Biltong Makers!! You can be included in this newsletter by clicking on the following link.
Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!

If you prefer not to receive email from us, you can unsubscribe from Biltongmakers.Com! by clicking on this link.
Unsubscribe me please.

April 2007

 

The home of Biltong, Boerewors, Potjiekos and much, much more!


Click here to find out more!

The Biltongmakers.Com Newsletter
April 2007
You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
If you do not wish to receive this newsletter you may unsubscribe at the bottom where you will find an automatic email link. Just click on that and send. Your name will then be permanently deleted from our database.
If you, your family or your friends want to subscribe to the newsletter please click on this link.

Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!
In this Newsletter

 

 

From the editor

DISCLAIMER

The information and contributions contained in this newsletter are received from various readers local and international. Views and opinions reflected in our newsletter are not necessarily those of Biltongmakers.Com and its team members.


Keerbergen
Belgium
April 2007Outside it can still be somber and cold. The noise of a windy April rain shower and the hail stones against the window don’t exactly point to the fact that spring is on the way.

And still!

When we, in between the rain showers, take a nice long walk, we can hear the happy “wietoewiet” from a couple of Kiewiten.

Hearing that we know that spring can’t be far away!

The coming back of the Kiewit heralds the start of the spring in the Low Lands.

There is this tradition in some of the northern provinces of Holland that once the first Kiewit egg is found, spring has officially arrived. The person who finds this egg takes it to the Town hall where it is, with much ceremony, handed to the Queen’s representative of the province.

Well, it is so far!

The egg has been found and handed over, the trees and bushes are full of blossoms and the tulips, crocuses and a host of other flowers are adorning every garden you see. Our alarm clock is packed away because we are once again woken up with the birds singing in the trees outside our bedroom window.
Now that it is spring we can enjoy the incredible colours of the blossoms on the trees and shrubs. Bright yellow, deep pink and, well, too many to mention. Just have a look at the picture on the left!

This morning when I woke up at around 2 (like I normally do) I looked out of one of the upstairs front windows. There were Mr and Mrs Duck waddling across the road with their brood! It is amazing sometimes.

You can be driving on a major road and all the traffic will come to a halt. When you get out of your car you see that some ducks are crossing the road. And they can take their time!!

With the incredible weather we have had most of our garden is ready for the summer! Most of the winter rubbish has been cleared, compost heap moved (to the neighbour’s garden with his kind permission) and the patios cleaned with the high pressure hose.

As you can see on the right June certainly did her bit!
All that remains to be done is to plant some bulbs and fill the flower boxes with our summer flowers. These go in front of the windows and also in the balcony gutters upstairs.

A couple of weekends ago Tony, Catherine and the kids came to stay. It was a long time ago that I almost saw the sun rise and my head is still sore! June made a “Pap en Vleis”. Excellent as usual and so were the “smoothies”!

So, here we are, all ready to enjoy a bit of warm weather.

I know that a couple of years back we could not get enough of the winters here. I suppose it was the sun in our blood that made us yearn for snow and rain and nice cozy evenings by the open fire. We still love that but a bit of warm weather will be very welcome right now!

And then ….

It’s our birthday this month. We are all of 12 years old!

So, have a look a bit further on what we have in store for you!

How time flies. I can still remember those early days when we first started with the web site and the biltong makers. We knew absolutely nothing and learned through making mistake after mistake. In the end it worked out not too bad I hope!

April promises to be a good month. The Boerewors and Droëwors orders are flying out of the door and …… very shortly we will have biltong as well! Yep, believe it or not but after all these years we finally took the plunge and imported a pucker biltong drying cabinet.

So, all you people in Europe, you can start emailing your orders through. There won’t be endless stock and we will have to restrict people to 2kg each in the beginning.

The biltong will be packed in vacuum packs of 200 gram which will cost € 7.00 each.
Orders will be processed on a first-come-first-served basis so be quick!



The Teddy Bok

Let me end on a little more serious note and make a a request for all of you to support a very worthwhile cause.

In 1980, Morne du Plessis, the then captain of the Western Province rugby team created a fund to support and take care of all rugby injuries from school age right up to professional players.

Morne started this fund after two wellknown rugby players, Chris Burger and Petro Jackson died of their injuries sustained while playing rugby.

One of the Fund’s missions is to instruct children at as many schools as possible how to prevent neck damages.

Rugby coaches are trained at school and club levels. Workshops on prevention are held all the time, all year round to create a safer rugby.

You can read more on the great work of the Players Fund on their web site www.playersfund.org.za

To generate an additional income for the Players Fund a fluffy toy Springbok called the “Teddybok” was created. The “Teddybok” became the official mascot of the Chris Burger/Petro Jackson Fund two years ago.

Come on people, stick your hands in your pockets and order a “Teddybok”. It is available in small, medium and large and it can be ordered from www.villagers.co.za

Well, that was it for this month.

Keep well, have a good April and we’ll speak again in May!

Take care,

Lo

 

 


There is never enough time to do it right the first time, but there is always enough time to do it over.
[Anonymous]

“When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.”
[Helen Keller]

 

Food for thought

Remember


Before the Internet or the AppleMac…
Before semi-automatics and crack cocaine…
Before SEGA or Cartoon Network…
Before Playstation and MTV…

Way, way back ….

 

  • I’m talking about the time of Hide and Seek in the park…..or the dark.
  • The cafe down the road?
  • Hopscotch, Donkey, skipping and hand stands, backyard cricket with a tomato box, Dandy & Beano annuals
  • French skipping, charms and “arlies”, jumping the river, living on the beach, building a swing from a piece of rope tied to a tree, tennis on the street or swing ball in the backyard.
  • The smell of suntan lotion, hot tar and Oros.
  • Wicks bubble gum for a cent.
  • An ice cream cone from the kombi that plays a tune.

Wait …. can you still remember ….

 

  • When around the corner seemed far away and going into town seemed like going somewhere, and your Ma made you “dress up” for the trip.
  • A million mozzie bites and peeling skin in summer.
  • Sticky fingers and sand in and on everything.
  • Cops and Robbers, Rounders, Stingers, Foefie slides and climbing trees.
  • Walking or riding your bike to school – no matter what the weather.
  • Running till you were out of breath.
  • Laughing so hard that your stomach hurt
  • Jumping on the bed….. Pillow fights. Spinning around, getting dizzy and falling down. Being tired from playing….. Remember that?
  • The worst embarrassment was being picked last for a team.
  • Paper water bombs and clay “lats” were the ultimate weapon.
  • A piece of card in the spokes held by a clothes peg transformed any bicycle into a motorcycle.

I’m not finished just yet!

Can you still taste and smell ….

  • Eating jelly powder from the box, ice lollies made from cold drink in Tupperware holders in the freezer.
  • Making sherbet from sugar and ENOS and boiling tins of condensed milk to make caramel – took hours!
  • Marshmallow fish and mice.

Remember when ….

    • There were two types of takkies – Tommies and the canvas ones, and the only time you wore them at school was for “PT”.
    • It wasn’t odd to have two or three “best” friends.

  • Nobody owned a pedigree dog.
  • 25 cents was decent pocket money.
  • When you’d reach into a muddy gutter for 5 cents and feel lucky.
  • When nearly everyone’s Mom was at home when the kids got there.
  • Remember when it was magic when dad would “remove” his thumb, or make 10 cents appear from behind your ear.
  • When it was considered a great privilege and very unusual to be taken out to dinner at a real restaurant or in a proper hotel.
  • When on a rare occasion Dad stopped at a roadhouse or “Dairy Den”.
  • Remember when any parent could discipline any kid, or feed him or use him to carry groceries and nobody, not even the kid, thought a thing of it.
  • When being sent to the headmaster’s office was nothing compared to the fate that awaited a misbehaving student at home. Basically, we were in fear for our lives but it wasn’t because of muggings, drugs, gangs, etc. Our parents and grandparents were a much bigger threat…… and some of us are still afraid of them!!!

Remember when ….

  • Decisions were made by going “eeny-meeny-miney-mo”.
  • Mistakes were corrected by simply exclaiming, “Nix!”
  • A “race issue” meant arguing about who ran the fastest.
  • Money was handled by whoever was the banker in “Monopoly”.
  • The worst thing you could catch from the opposite sex was germs.
  • Having a weapon in school meant being caught with a BIC pen, pea shooter or a “cattie”.
  • Taking drugs meant orange-flavoured chewable vitamin C or Milk of Magnesia.
  • Ice cream was considered a basic food group.
  • Skills and courage were discovered because of a “dare”.
  • Older Siblings were the worst tormentors, but also the fiercest protectors.

Didn’t that feel good…..just to go back and say, Yeah, I remember that!!!

If you can remember most or all of these, then you have LIVED!!!!

Pass this on to anyone who grew up in South Africa who may need a break from their “grown up” life!

Take care,

Story of the month


The Cuckoo Clock

Lake Konstanz at LudwigshavenIt was dark and misty that morning when I left Ludwigshafen on lake Kontanz, in the South of Germany, and headed back home to Belgium. The road would take me via Strasbourg in France and then on to Luxembourg and Brussels.

Suzie (my GPS) was showing me a shortcut through the Black Forest that would save about an hour in driving time. After a while on the small winding roads of the hills in the the Black Forest I saw a small little sign on my left saying “Cuckoo Clocks”.

It was still early in the morning and, with most of the mist gone and a with a bright wintry sun trying to penetrate the dense pine forests on the hills around me, I thought, why not, I don’t come here often so let’s go and have a look.

I remember that in an earlier life we always had a Cuckoo Clock hanging on the wall in the lounge. You surely know what I am talking about. These clocks with a rabbit and bird on the front, a deer head with horns on the top and two pine cones on the chains below to wind the clock.

Every so often a little bird would appear from a little door in the front to let out a happy sound similar to what the cuckoo birds makes.

The largest Cuckoo Clock in the world!Was I in for a surprise that morning.

The road got narrower winding itself in between the mountains towards the little town of Triberg. On both sides of the road signs started to appear advertising cuckoo clocks. The area was literally littered with places making cuckoo clocks.

And then, without warning there was the little town of Triberg and right in front of me the largest Cuckoo clock in the world in the shape of a little house.

Triberg im Schwarzwald is a town in Baden-Württemberg, Germany, located in the Schwarzwald-Baar district in the Black Forest. It is a small little town of only about 5000 souls.

I have included some pictures I took of this clock. The mechanism is incredible and almost entirely made of wood. Do yourself a favour and click on the pictures to see them big. It’s worth the trouble to wait for them to download if you have a slow internet line.

So, there and then I though that this would make a nice bit of reading and after a little research came up with the following.

The History of the Cuckoo Clock

The first cuckoo clock dates back to around 1730. It was a product of the almost 100 years of clock making in the Black Forest of Germany that started sometime in the mid 17th century.
Though there are a number stories of who built the first clock, Franz Anton Ketterer has been given the credit.

The first cuckoo clocks were primitive compared to those made later. Their movements were made with wooden plates and gears. Many of the clocks had square faces painted with water color paints.

Part of the mechanismThe pendulumThe Cuckoo waiting behind the door of the houseAs time went on, the clocks became more and more sophisticated in their designs and decorations. The birds’ wings and beaks were animated and some decorated with feathers.

The many themes decorating the clocks were only limited to the imagination of the painters of the faces for the clocks. They included scenes of family, hunting, military motifs and more.
Some were even decorated with porcelain columns and enameled dials.

Some of the more famous early cuckoo clock makers in the Black Forest were Theodore Ketterer, Johann Baptist Beha and Fidel Hepting.

By the late 1800s the cuckoo industry was some what industrialized.
As well as factories where the clocks where made and assembled, families would live and work together in large cottages, each individual working on the part of the clock they specialized in. Some carved the decorations, others assembling the movement and still others fitting movements in the cases.
There were an estimated 13 500 men and women engaged in the clock making industry in the villages in and around Triberg.

I saw this clearly all along the roads leading to and from Triberg. The miriad of signs pointing not to factories but to homesteads and small homes where till today the cuckoo clocks are made by small home industries.

The Cuckoo Bird

The Cuckoo can be found in Africa, Asia and Northern Europe. They are slim bodied and are about 13 inches in length. They have a blue-grey head, breast and upper parts, and horizontal barring on the under parts.
However, the female also exists as a rare rufous (reddish) morph, so instead of being grey it is red-brown. They never build a nest, preferring instead to lay their eggs in the nests of other birds who unwittingly raise the cuckoo fledglings as their own.

 

* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *
The South African Meat Industry Company,
Samic has BRAND-NEW meat cutting charts. Just scroll down to tips of the month to access them.
Do yourself a favour and click on the banner below for lots of interesting information.


 

Our Home Biltong Makers


Nothing compares with out Home Biltong Makers ……

Our Home Biltong makers have given many of our customers much joy and happiness and have brought many of them “a little of South Africa” back in their homes.

It is so easy to make your own Biltong and it is ever so cost effective. In fact it only costs you just a fraction of the price you pay in the shop and, what is more important, you can make it just the way YOU like it.

Please read what these people have to say.


COMMENTS FROM BILTONG LOVERS AROUND THE WORLD!


Hi Biltong Guys!

WOW ….. our first batch of biltong was great !!!!!

We have a butcher here in Canada who had a shop in Toronto in a prominent South African area, so he started making wors and biltong, not bad, but not like ours!!
He had since relocated to our area, much to our delight! To start of our Rockeys 5kg BILTONG MAKER we made droëwors with his wors and the family consumed it in about four days.
But when the biltong was ready from the Quick Biltong Recipe it was gone in two days! I had to hide a piece to give to my daughter in Miami, especially as she has shares in the Biltong Maker as my son’s Christmas present.

Rockey’s Biltongmaker has a permanent place in the kitchen as is working all the time!!
Thanks for keeping in touch with your newsletters, I do enjoy receiving them, as well as all the future Biltong we will be eating.

Alles van die beste,
Dawn Lyell
Coldwater, Ontario, Canada (05-03-2007)
alandawn70@yahoo.co.uk


      Dear Lo,
      Just a brief note to thank you for sending us our 5kg Biltong maker.
      It has generated a buzz in our household with and immediate competition between my lovely wife and I on the best batch of ‘tong between us.
      By day two the kids and I had already started the sampling and things are looking good!!
      We just had the Johnny Clegg concert in Dubai so the whole process of biltong making, Castle Lager and good South African entertainment was well timed.
      You obviously love what you do as you have spent a lot of time preparing your web site, filled with so many recipes and other informative stuff.
      Keep it up so we all can smile,
      Best wishes,
      Liam Hamilton Potts

Dubai, UAE(20-02-2007)
lhp@icltdxb.ae


And so more and more people keep on telling us how fantastic it is to make your own biltong!
You can read loads more of what people are saying (we only started keeping records in 2001)
on our customers comments page.

So, to all of you who have not tried it yet, now is the time!

ESPECIALLY WITH THE BIRTHDAY SPECIALS WE HAVE FOR YOU THIS MONTH! (SEE BELOW!)

The most popular Home Biltong Maker in the world!You too could be making your own Biltong in a very short space of time.
Have a look at our Home Biltong Makers and see how easy it is!!

Details on ROCKEY’S 5kg Home Biltong Maker can be found by clicking on this link.

It's as easy as 1-2-3 to make your own Biltong!

You can have a look at the BILTONG BUDDY here.

Our special birthday gifts to you!


It is our 12th birthday this month!

And……… we are going to make you part of the celebrations with some very special prices on most of our goodies!

Before we carry on we must mention that although we have ample stock on hand at the moment, we may run into trouble towards the end of the month and there might be a delay in shipping. So be quick and make use of this absolutely ONCE-OFF opportunity to start making your own biltong!

From the publication of this newsletter until the last day of this month or for as long as our present stocks last here are your prices …..

 

BILTONG BUDDY Biltong Maker
R 750.00
R 645.00
ROCKEY’S 5kg Biltong Maker
R 950.00
R 745.00
Wooden Blackwood Biltong Cutter
R 390.00
R 290.00
Small-Industrial Biltong Shredder (hand model)
R 1495.00
R 895.00
Plaaswors Boerewors Spice (600 gram)
R 65.00
R 55.00
Safari Biltong Spice (pre-mixed 500 gram)
R 65.00
R 45.00
SI30-30kg Drying Cabinet (Small-Industrial)
R 5995.00
R 5995.00


So ….. what are you waiting for??
More? Ok then, with every order for a Biltong Maker we will pack 20 special Biltong Storage bags!

 

(Click here to get them now with your biltong maker!)

Click here to go to our on-line shop.

Tips of the month


Here are some really useful tips!

 

  • The next time you boil potatoes in their jacket just add a little lemon juice. The potatoes will boil snow white and your pot won’t have any marks!
  • The next time you have people in your house who smoke just put some salt in the bottom of each ashtray. The salt will absorb the smell of the cigarette ash.
  • Add two aspirins to the water in a vase and your flowers will keep much longer.
  • To remove scratch marks on a CD just rub some peanut butter on it with a soft cloth.
  • Some of the things you can do with a can of Coke!
    • First of all you can drink it of course.
    • Then you can empty a can of Coke in the toilet, leave it for an hour or so and your toilet will be sparkling white!
    • When your battery terminals are corroded just empty a can of Coke over them. The Coke will eat away the corrosion.
    • To remove grease stains from clothing put some Coke on them. The Coke will help to break up the grease marks.
    • Just imagine what it does to your stomach!!
  • Tired of all the dog poops all over the garden? Just pick them up and put them somewhere you want your dog to do his business. After a while he will go only there.
  • Are your towels “hard” after being washed? Wash them in warm water and soap and add a handful of salt (dilute it first). Don’t use a softener. Rinse well and add a little ammonia with the last rinse.
  • To take ink out of carpets just put some buttermilk on the spot and rub it in with a clean cloth until the stain has gone. Wash afterwards with warm water and a little ammonia.
  • Get rid of insects on animals by washing them with the water you boiled potatoes in. Repeat a couple of times.
  • Cockroaches – Put some cloves in all your kitchen cupboards!
  • A smelly cat box? Just mix the cat sand with a little baby powder.
  • In the Kitchen:
    • Lemon juice and bicarbonate of soda works better that CIF or Handy Andy
    • Vinegar and bicarbonate of soda makes a very good disinfectant.
    • Lemon juice and citrus soda takes the “elbow grease” out of cleaning a burned pot.
  • Try keeping copper and brass clean by rubbing it occasionally with a mixture of salt and vinegar
  • Chewing gum problems? Rub it with an ice cube until hard and remove. If it leaves a mark rub it with a little turpentine
  • Crayon marks on wall or clothing? Just brush it with some toothpaste on an old toothbrush
  • To clean artificial flowers put them in a paper bag with some salt. Shake well. The salt takes all the dust and dirt of the flowers.
  • To prevent weevils in flour, pasta rice etc. just put a little white candle in the container.
  • To clean your microwave oven just heat half a cup of vinegar in the oven. No need to boil it! The vinegar will loosen all the dirt. Afterward just clean with a soft cloth.
  • Moles? The easiest is if you have dogs. Just throw the poops in the mole hole!
  • To take care of moths just put some orange peels in between your clothes.
  • Remove nicotine stains from your fingers with a little lemon juice.
  • Old soap recipe:
    • 4 kg beef fat
    • 1.5 liter water
    • 1 kg bicarbonate of soda.
    • Melt the fat till it becomes oil, add the water and the bicarbonate of soda and stir on and off for three hours. Cool and cut in shapes.
  • To keep your fridge smelling fresh just put a piece of coal inside. The coal will absorb all the smells.


South African Meat Cutting Charts


Below you will find three BRAND-NEW meat cutting charts.

These are displayed with the compliments of SAMIC.
(The South African Meat Industry Company).
SAMIC has a very interesting web site as well as a weekly newsletter about anything to do with the
Meat Industry in South Africa.
Now, don’t think this is a totally boring web site (I thought so first) but it has some very interesting articles and statistics.


Beef Cutting Chart
Pork Cutting Chart
Lamb Cutting Chart




English Meat Cutting Charts

These charts you find here are very detailed also showing what you can do with the different cuts.

They come from EBLEX
(English Beef and Lamb Executive)

They have a fun web site at www.beefyandlamby.co.uk with loads of excellent recipes to boot!
A site really worth visiting!
For the cutting charts click on the links below

UK Beef Cuts
UK Lamb Cuts
* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *
South African Musical and other Events in Europe


For all upcoming shows by South African artists please click on the South African events web site link below.
There are a host of South African artists coming to Europe in the next couple of weeks.

Amongst those are;

  • Koos Kombuis – Aardvark Pub, London
  • Bok van Blerk – Aardvark Pub, London
  • Tidal Waves – Festival, Estival in Braschaat, Belgium
  • HA!Man – Holland, Belgium, France
  • Jan Blohm – Boom, Antwerp
  • Amanda Strydom – Den Bosch and Hoogeveen, Holland
  • Johny Clegg – France, Luxembourg and Belgium


And many, many others ………

To see all upcoming events please click on South African Events in Europe web site. There are loads of things happening!

Questions and Answers


Like every month, here is our regular section on the many questions we receive from our readers all over the world.
If we have not given an answer and you can help these people could you please mail them?
(Please copy us in on your mails @
info@biltongmakers.com
so we can help other people who might have the same questions in the future)


QUESTION

I have clients coming to hunt a rhino with us and would like to know if I can use the meat to eat and make biltong.
Please give me your thoughts.

Jessie Bird
South Africa
jebird@mweb.co.za

 



QUESTION

When meat is dried what temperature is it done at and are there any enzymes destroyed in the meat?
Thank you in advance for your answer.

Dan Kremer
Yorkshire,OH, USA
Dan@eatfoodforlife.com

 



QUESTION

Please can somebody help with regard to the salt.
We have purchased one of the Biltong Buddies, but I have a huge problem that I hope someone can help us with. I cannot find Rock salt anywhere here in Alberta, Canada.
I have only seen Coarse Salt and Pickling Salt. Both of these are like small peppercorns in size and very very salty. A friend of ours here in Canada used one of these salts, but the biltong was too dry and very salty.
Much appreciated for anyone’s help.

Penny Mcloughlin
Alberta, Canada
machome@shaw.ca

 



Click to see me bigQUESTION

ive made some biltong and some of its gone mouldy. i have mad sure that there not toucchinng but it continues to mould wats going on????

chris

Chris
Australia
hadlows5@bigpond.com

 



QUESTION

Is it possible to use mouton/sheep to make biltong and what part is the best to use.

Philip Celen
Kalmhout, Belgium
philip.celen@skynet.be

 

Stoep Talk

Beware the attack of the Twinkletonians ….
By James ClarkeIt is now more than a third of a century since Pioneer 10 was launched by NASA – a spacecraft designed to travel beyond our solar system and into deep space.

It is now 15-billion kilometers from Earth.

It sent its last faint signal five years ago – a signal that took almost 24 hours to reach Earth.

It carries a gold plaque engraved with a message of goodwill and a map showing the Earth’s location in the solar system.

That gold plaque continues to worry me. It could represent the most stupid thing mankind has ever done.

The idea is that some “Thing” out there might find our spacecraft and immediately realize there is something akin to intelligent life on a distant planet.

There is even a drawing on the plaque of a nude man and woman standing against the outline of Pioneer 10.

Thus, whatever finds Pioneer 10 will have an idea of the size and shape of humans.

I have conjectured before about what could happen after that.

Imagine if the finder is the size of a cooling tower and has six heads and 36 arms and poor under-arm hygiene, and it views the naked couple as jelly babies.

THINKS: Wow! A planet full of living, wriggling jelly babies!

It persuades King Zog of the planet Twinkle to mount an expedition to our planet and they begin harvesting us and popping us into sweet jars for little Twinkletonians to squabble over.

“Ooh, more jelly babies! Bags I the black ones!” yell the kids.

“Naah, you ate all the black ones last time.

“Ma! Boogle’s being selfish again!”

“If you kids don’t shut up I’ll put you both in the pot with your sister for dinner tonight!”

Or what if these giants serve us up in bowls as snacks at cocktail parties – with cheese dip? Or serve as with custard? Or in aspic?

What if they are like the Chinese and treat us like seals snipping off what they want and drying them for aphrodisiacs and discarding the rest?

Or like Westerners and raise us for meat in pigsties with troughs full of their kitchen waste?

What if they pop us into blenders?

The trouble is that on the gold plaque NASA has clearly identified our solar system and our precise location within it.

To the Aliens, our solar system might be what Kyalami Race Track is to us and we’ll have them tearing around at night landing willy-nilly – like on top of the Free State, flattening Bloemfontein.

Well, that’s all right I suppose. But what if it’s Gauteng?

By the same token, of course, the Twinkletonians could be our size and terribly friendly and swarm here in their millions. They might like us so much they’ll climb into our beds and silently snuggle up – which might be fine except what if they are slimy and cold and smell like yesterday’s nappy?

But then again they could be really humongous giants who scoop up our tiny little planet, along with Mars and Venus and the rest, to play marbles with.

Whatever – it is too late now to recall Pioneer 10. The die is cast.

Sleep well.


POTES’ CORNER

I have a pome from Glen Parnall of Auckland Park – derived from a series of verses he recalls as a child.

A cow stood on the railway track
He said, “I’m brave of course.”
The train came round the bend, Toot Toot.

Boerewors!


And aspirant pote, Derek Rubidge, with a hint of despair, wrote:

I sit mainly at home
Penning a pome

Recipe Corner


Koeksisters

The Syrup

Ingredients

  • 4 Cups white sugar
  • 1/2 cup of water
  • 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 2 sticks cinnamon, or 1/2 a teaspoon of cinnamon


Method

  • Dissolve the sugar in the water
  • Add the ginger, cream of tartar, cinnamon and bring to the boil stirring for a while
  • Boil for about 5 mins, but watch it as to not to boil over
  • Cool to cold before using (Keep in the fridge overnight before using the next day!!)


Optional:
You can add about 1-2 teaspoons of glycerine to the water before you take it off the stove. This will add a shine or gloss to the koeksisters.

 



The Koeksisters

Ingredients

  • 4 cups flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1 or 1.5 cups of milk
  • Oil for deep fat frying.


Method

  • Sift the dry ingredients, and rub in the butter, with the fingertips or cut it in with a pastry cutter
  • Beat the egg and add the milk and mix lightly to a soft dough
  • Knead well and leave for about 2 hours or more. (I did it the night before and put it into a packet till the next day)
  • Roll out to 1 cm thickness, cut into strips and plait and twist them.
  • Fry them in deep fat for 1 to 2 minutes or until light brown. You can do about 5 or 6 at the same time.
  • When golden brown on one side,turn over with a fork and fry to a golden brown on the other side.
  • Remove them with lifter and drain on absorbent paper.
  • Dunk in the syrup


Important Tip!

When its time to dunk the fried koeksisters in the syrup, place the pot with the syrup, into a large basin with ice cubes to the prevent the syrup from becoming too warm, the syrup has to be kept cold.

Add the remaining syrup over them once finished, they taste better.

Makes about 5 to 6 dozen and you can packet and put them in the freezer. They keep better that way and won’t freeze.
Enjoy!!!!

Happy baking from Lorraine Austin
Brisbane Australia

 

Stories from South Africa


New anti-smoking Bill to impose hefty fines

The effects of the “scare factor” of the new tobacco Bill – setting fines of up to R50 000 for owners of clubs, bars and restaurants who allow patrons to light up illegally – will be eagerly watched by anti-smoking campaigners.

The Bill was passed by parliament this week and campaigners hope it will become law before the end of June.

It will impose heavy fines on errant club, bar and restaurant owners who previously faced only a R 200.00 “smack on the wrist”.

“We are hoping there will be a high degree of voluntary compliance once it becomes law,” said the Director of the Campaign Against Smoking, Peter Ucko.

‘We are hoping there will be a high degree of voluntary compliance’ “We don’t want to use the big stick, but we will press for the prosecution of those who fail to comply.”

Ucko hoped the big fines would act as a strong deterrent to those clubs and bars which had thus far ignored the ban on smoking in public places.

“We already have a high degree of compliance in shopping centers. Let’s hope the same thing now happens in clubs and bars.”

He said press reports this week that referred to “clubs and bars where smoking is permitted” had been very misleading.

“Smoking is not permitted in any clubs and bars. It is only permitted in a section of a club or bar that has been specially set aside in accordance with the regulations.”

 

 ‘Smoking is not permitted
in any clubs
and bars’
 Ucko said his organisation was ready to help the Department of Health to gear up for the enforcement of the Bill, which would amend the Tobacco Control Act.

“The Health Department has indicated it wants us to go round the country with it to train officials about the new legislation.”
He hoped there would be a new enthusiasm among health authorities and the police to prosecute offenders now that the penalties for smoking in public places had been increased.


The penalty for smoking in clubs and bars – the fine of R 200.00 that came into effect on January 1 2001 – had not been a strong deterrent and had not encouraged the authorities to prosecute, he said.

“But if I go to a policeman with an offense that carries a fine of R 50 000.00, it is worth his while to do some leg work and take it to a prosecutor.”

Ucko said the new amendment that allowed the minister of health to regulate the ingredients, additives and emissions of tobacco was very important.

“Some producers have been adding chocolate and liquorice to make their cigarettes more attractive,” he said.

“Cigarette smoke is harsh, but it is less so if you add liquorice. And this encourages children to take up smoking.”

He said the amendments would allow the minister to limit the amount of addictive nicotine in tobacco.

The amendments would also allow the minister to regulate cigarettes’ ignition propensity, those additives that made them burn right down to the filter “when left alone”.

This ignition propensity, he said, started fires that cost South Africa a “fortune” each year. “Without the additives South Africa would have what we like to call self-extinguishing cigarettes.”

Ucko said the Bill would now go to the National Council of Provinces for approval. “It will then go to the president to sign and finally to the printer of the Government Gazette.

“It is a total guess, but I would say it is reasonable to expect the Bill to become law before the end of June.”

 

* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *

Support the Teddy bok South African Musical and other Events in Europe

Dear Lo, I need your help, The response from the banner, on Biltong makers, is very poor. 3 sales in one month. I think , if you the creator of this formidable web site could put a good word for Teddybok and its mission It will make a big difference. You are the good old friend and the reporter and let’s face it : THE BILTONG PROVIDER for all the expats. The Super Fourteen Rugby season has started. If you news letter can carry the Teddybok story in its editorial It would reach your readers. Story for your inspiration. Teddybok is the Mascot of the Players Fund. The Fund was created in 1980 by Morne du Plessis the then captain of the Western Province Team. Rugby players. Chris Burger and Petro Jackson. Both died of their injuries while playing this wonderful game we all love to follow. The fund benefits immediately from your purchase of a TeddyBok. The Fund takes care of all rugby injuries from school age right up to professional players. It also has a mission to instruct all the children at many schools as possible how to prevent neck damages. Rugby coaches are trained at school and club levels. Workshops on prevention are held all The time, all year round to create a safer rugby. More on the great work of the Players’ fund on their web site: www.playersfund.org.za More on Teddybok just type: Teddybok, then enter on your Google bar. Since two years TeddyBok became the mascot of the national team. It is available in Small, Medium and Large. To order just click on the link. There it is Lo, thank you for your help ! Jean-Luc

–>

Around the World


Bits and Bobs from people around the world

We don’t know who send the following to us but we can all relate to it, especially now in the Spring!

The Daffodil Principle

Several times my daughter had telephoned to say, “Mother, you must come to see the daffodils before they are over.” I wanted to go, but it was a two-hour drive from Laguna to Lake Arrowhead “I will come next Tuesday”, I promised a little reluctantly on her third call.

Next Tuesday dawned cold and rainy. Still, I had promised, and reluctantly I drove there. When I finally walked into Carolyn’s house I was welcomed by the joyful sounds of happy children. I delightedly hugged and greeted my grandchildren.

“Forget the daffodils, Carolyn! The road is invisible in these clouds and fog, and there is nothing in the world except you and these children that I want to see badly enough to drive another inch!”

My daughter smiled calmly and said, “We drive in this all the time, Mother.” “Well, you won’t get me back on the road until it clears, and then I’m heading for home!” I assured her.

“But first we’re going to see the daffodils. It’s just a few blocks,” Carolyn said. “I’ll drive. I’m used to this.”

“Carolyn,” I said sternly, “Please turn around.” “It’s all right, Mother, I promise. You will never forgive yourself if you miss this experience.”

After about twenty minutes, we turned onto a small gravel road and I saw a small church. On the far side of the church, I saw a hand lettered sign with an arrow that read, ” Daffodil Garden .” We got out of the car, each took a child’s hand, and I followed Carolyn down the path. Then, as we turned a corner, I looked up and gasped. Before me lay the most glorious sight.

It looked as though someone had taken a great vat of gold and poured it over the mountain peak and its surrounding slopes. The flowers were planted in majestic, swirling patterns, great ribbons and swaths of deep orange, creamy white, lemon yellow, salmon pink, and saffron and butter yellow. Each different-colored variety was planted in large groups so that it swirled and flowed like its own river with its own unique hue. There were five acres of flowers.
“Who did this?” I asked Carolyn. “Just one woman,” Carolyn answered. “She lives on the property. That’s her home.” Carolyn pointed to a well-kept A-frame house, small and modestly sitting in the midst of all that glory. We walked up to the house.

On the patio, we saw a poster. “Answers to the Questions I Know You Are Asking”, was the headline. The first answer was a simple one. “50,000 bulbs,” it read. The second answer was, “One at a time, by one woman. Two hands, two feet, and one brain.” The third answer was, “Began in 1958.”

For me, that moment was a life-changing experience. I thought of this woman whom I had never met, who, more than forty years before, had begun, one bulb at a time, to bring her vision of beauty and joy to an obscure mountaintop. Planting one bulb at a time, year after year, this unknown woman had forever changed the world in which she lived. One day at a time, she had created something of extraordinary magnificence, beauty, and inspiration. The principle her daffodil garden taught is one of the greatest principles of celebration.

That is, learning to move toward our goals and desires one step at a time–often just one baby-step at time–and learning to love the doing, learning to use the accumulation of time. When we multiply tiny pieces of time with small increments of daily effort, we too will find we can accomplish magnificent things. We can change the world .

“It makes me sad in a way,” I admitted to Carolyn. “What might I have accomplished if I had thought of a wonderful goal thirty-five or forty years ago and had worked away at it ‘one bulb at a time’ through all those years? Just think what I might have been able to achieve!”

My daughter summed up the message of the day in her usual direct way. “Start tomorrow,” she said.

She was right. It’s so pointless to think of the lost hours of yesterdays. The way to make learning a lesson of celebration instead of a cause for regret is to only ask, “How can I put this to use today?”

Use the Daffodil Principle.

Stop waiting …..

 

Until your car or home is paid off

Until you get a new car or home
Until your kids leave the house
Until you go back to school
Until you finish school
Until you clean the house
Until you organize the garage
Until you clean off your desk
Until you lose 10 lbs.
Until you gain 10 lbs.
Until you get married
Until you get a divorce
Until you have kids
Until the kids go to school
Until you retire
Until summer
Until spring
Until winter
Until fall
Until you die ….


There is no better time than right now to be happy. Happiness is a journey, not a destination.

So work like you don’t need money.

Love like you’ve never been hurt, and, Dance like no one’s watching.

If you want to brighten someone’s day, pass this on to someone special.

I just did!

Wishing you a beautiful, daffodil day!

Don’t be afraid that your life will end, be afraid that it will never begin.

~anonymous

 

Something to smile about


Found on women’s T-shirts

  • I child proofed my house, but they still get in.
  • (on the front) 60 is not old…. (on the back) if you’re a tree.
  • I’m still hot… it just comes in flashes.
  • At my age, getting lucky means finding my car in the parking lot.
  • My reality check just bounced.
  • Life is short, make fun of it.
  • I’m not 50…. I’m $49.95 plus tax.
  • Annapolis – a drinking town with a sailor problem.
  • I need somebody bad… are you bad?
  • Physically pffffft!
  • Buckle up, it makes it harder for the aliens to snatch you from your car.
  • I’m not a snob. I’m just better than you are.
  • It’s my cat’s world. I’m just here to open cans.
  • Earth is the insane asylum of the universe.
  • Keep staring…. I may do a trick.
  • We got rid of the kids – the cat was allergic.
  • Dangerously under-medicated.
  • My mind works like lightning. One brilliant flash and it’s gone.
  • Every time I hear the dirty word; exercise, I wash my mouth out with chocolate.
  • Cats regard people as warm-blooded furniture.
  • Live your life so that when you die, the preacher will not have to tell lies at your funeral.

Sport talk


Snippets from the papers

Left takes power in World Cup
Left is proving to be just right at the World Cup. Bowlers are finding it difficult to keep their reputation intact against teams having a left-handed power-hitter at the top of the order in the Caribbean.
Full Story ….

Sangakkara praises Sri Lanka’s golden oldies
[ Cricket ] Wicketkeeper Kumar Sangakkara believes golden oldies Sanath Jayasuriya and Muttiah Muralitharan are proving to be the inspiration as Sri Lanka target a second World Cup title.
Full Story ….

Lions feel the crush after 10 weeks of rugby
After 10 weeks of gruelling Super 14 rugby, the Lions’ bubble finally burst. And with it, possibly any hopes of reaching the semifinals.
Full Story ….

Cape braces itself for 200 000 soccer fans
At least 200 000 soccer fans will visit Cape Town during the 2010 World Cup, according to MEC for Transport and Public Works Marius Fransman.
Full Story ….



-Where can you watch rugby on TV?-
Click here to find out where in most countries!
Let’s hear from you too!!


Let’s make the next issue a Bumper one!

It is now April and we have not had much response to our request for contributions to our newsletter. It is not easy to come up with new stuff all the time and we largely depend on you, the reader.

So, to all those people who subscribe to our newsletter and to those who send us enthusiastic emails about how they enjoy reading it …….. why not put pen to paper yourself and lend us a hand.

You are probably sitting at the computer right now so how about it. Let our readers enjoy your story!
It does not have to be about Biltong or such. We’d love to hear where you live and how you have adapted yourself to your new life style and surroundings.

You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask?
Perhaps you have some advice to give?

You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Share it with other people around the world!

Boerewors in Europe


Boerewors (Europe only, sorry people!)

Click to see me biggerThe braaing season has started in Europe and the air was heavy with the smell of fires and the cooking of meat Easter Weekend.
Nothing though is as recognizable and delicious as the smell of some real South African boerewors on the coals.
Boeries on the braai!Our customers took heed and came in their droves to stock up for the Easter Weekend!
We always have ample stock of boerewors, droëwors and ………. we also now have limited quantities of biltong.
The way I used to like it back home, with a little bit of fat and still a little wet.

So if you need Boerewors just click on
“all about our boerewors”. You can either collect or we can mail it to you.
All our customers in Holland, Belgium and in fact, all over Europe are raving about the packing of and the condition in which the wors arrived at their doorsteps.

Just imagine some “lekker” pap and wors with a nice tomato and onion sauce!

Just give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.

Our Boerewors is vacuum packed in quantities of about 500 gram.
The normal price is € 8.45 per kg but during our birthday month of April it’s yours for only € 7.95 per kg!!

Droëwors


Droëwors …… a typical South African delicacy all of its own!

Droëwors, as it is known in South Africa, is as much part of the country’s culinary culture as Biltong, Pap, Boerewors and Potjiekos.
Real South African Droë Wors!Our spices are of course imported especially from South Africa so you will get the “real” thing!

We have around 150kg Droëwors in stock right now but please hurry because it always seems to disappear like snow before the sun.

The price is € 28.00 per kg or € 7.00 per 250 gram packet.

Droëwors travels well and posting is an ideal option.
We can mail it to you in Europe and the UK via priority mail in minimum quantities of 500 gram.

See all the information and mailing rates by going to www.boerewors.be

Interested? Just complete the order form you find when you go to the www.boerewors.be web site or give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25 or email.

Lamb on the Spit


Lamb on the Spit ……. something special!

Spring is here and the summer is nigh and it is time to start planning your special functions.

Lamb on the Spit is a way of entertaining as only known by very few mainly because it is thought
to be very expensive ……. Not so!

Click to see me big!We will do a lamb on the Spit for parties of between 30 and 50 people from just € 15.00 per person.

Together with the lamb we will treat you to a big pot of curried potatoes as well as a choice between a pasta salad or three-bean salad. Garlic or bread rolls are included as well.
For venues more than 50 km from our home base in Keerbergen there is a small transport fee.
Just keep in mind that quite a number of dates in May and June are already booked and remember that we are doing these functions only during weekends.

 

Booking early is essential and you can do so on
+32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.

(A Lamb on the Spit can only be done outside because we cook on coals!)

 

Lamb on the Spit


You can click on the links below to view some of the previous issues of our newsletter.

 

 


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February 2007

 

The home of Biltong, Boerewors, Potjiekos and much, much more!


Click here to find out more!

The Biltongmakers.Com Newsletter
February 2007
You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
If you do not wish to receive this newsletter you may unsubscribe at the bottom where you will find an automatic email link. Just click on that and send. Your name will then be permanently deleted from our database.
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In this Newsletter

 

 

From the editor

DISCLAIMER

The information and contributions contained in this newsletter are received from various readers local and international. Views and opinions reflected in our newsletter are not necessarily those of Biltongmakers.Com and its team members.


Keerbergen
Belgium
February 2007So, here we are back from an incredible trip to the Far East!

Singapore was beautiful and relaxing and it was great to have a daughter who lives there to show us around and who looked after us so well!

Lunchtime in Bangkok!Bangkok was an eye-opener. I have never seen so many roadside stalls and cookeries as we saw there. It seems that everybody just eats all the time.
You see myriads of cooking stalls serving anything from prawns, to squid and frogs and tortoises. The latter are slaughtered on the spot and all food is prepared fresh in huge woks.

I must say that I stopped myself at the look of some of it although I promised myself that I would try everything once.

Singapore was different. Very much first world and with it’s own beauty. There is so much to do and see that you can keep yourself busy for weeks without a problem.

Singapore is a multi-ethnic city with a population of about 4 million people, many of whom are descendants of immigrants from China (76%), the Malay Peninsula (14%), the Indian sub-continent (8%), and Europe (2%).
Eurasians do not form a single ethnic group, but are the descendants of various Asian peoples (Malay, Chinese, Indian, Bataks etc.) on the one hand and “Europeans” (the colonial powers such as the Portuguese, Dutch and British as well as migrants from Central and Eastern Europe) on the other.

While there, and leafing through some books on Singapore, I saw the graph for the yearly temperatures. Virtually a straight line of 31C average!

The town has a couple of very distinct areas and we could be found in any or more of them most of the time!

First of all there is Orchard road.
This is a long road where you find the most incredible shopping centers. The wealth just oozes out of every pore of every building in Orchard road.

Buildings such as Ngee-Ann City and the Paragon are a shoppers’ paradise with all of the designer shops such as Chanel, Prada etc. etc. next to the most exquisite restaurants.
There are restaurants and places to eat (huge food courts) all over town. It seems that food is the favourite pastime for all Singaporeans!

Of course there are other shopping centers as well in other parts of the town. Some of them have over 1 million square feet of retail space!

One of the many tiny streets in Singapore's China Town [picture courtesy Gwendy]Then there is China Town with its narrow little streets crammed with tiny shops, road-side food stalls and small “restaurants”. We had breakfast there once in Smith street. I had a typical Chinese breakfast consisting of two boiled eggs (1 minute only) and bread with butter ladled on it. A runny business!

Another area is Little India. There we found find myriads of Indian eateries and shops as well as a huge, block long, four storey shopping center called Mustafa’s. This is a 24 hour shopping Mecca for anything from the latest in electronics to a bar of soap.
Needless to say we spent a lot of time looking (and buying) some of the goodies on sale.

Before I forget I must mention Funan Digital Center. This is a 5 storey shopping center just for electronics. You must see it to believe it!

Then there is the Colonial part with all its old colonial buildings dating back to the 1800s. That part of town with its long esplanade and beautiful rolling parks is a little haven in the middle of the hustle and bustle that is Singapore.

The first night we had dinner in a Banana Leaf Restaurant. Your plate is a banana leaf. I had the curried fish head which is a ‘must’ when you visit Singapore. Just as much as the Singapore Sling in the Long Bar at the Raffles hotel!

The Raffles Hotel is also typically colonial and very, very pricy!

One of our favourites was to visit the “wet markets”. These are long halls with stalls where wet foods are cleaned and sold. Food such as fish, prawns, frogs and squid are just a couple of the normal things we saw there. I won’t mention some of the others. (Gag!)

Next to a “wet market” you will find a food court where you can get anything and everything. My favourite was the suckling pig but I passed by the “Intestine Soup” place. I guess that I was just not cut out to have soup made from pig liver, bladder, stomach and such. Rather give me some frogs then!

But, back to what is normal for us ….

Just South of Singapore is Sentosa Island. Sentosa is full of hotels and entertainment for young and old. One of the most impressive was the undersea aquarium.
You “walk” on a moving belt through a glass tunnel with fish and other sea animals all around you. Quite incredible!

Orchard's Road Centerpoint at Christmas timeAs a Christmas present we were given a two night stay at the Shrangila Hotel on Sentosa . These hotels are going to be my death one day. The food is so nice that I just can’t stop eating!

This stay gave us a welcome break from all the sightseeing and shopping we had been doing!
If you want to see something really incredible visit Singapore during Christmas time.

The lighting is something out of a 1001 nights!


And then there was Bangkok ………

Very, very much third world but with incredible temples and palaces. Everything is very inexpensive. So we would sit in a river side restaurant for about three hours just nibbling on prawns at just R 9.00 (that’s not a typo) or 90 Euro cents per plate!

Taxi’s cost around 2-4 Euros and the Tuk-Tuks 1-2 Euros.

Once again there were the China Town and Indian sections and the rich center of Bangkok with the largest shopping center I have ever seen. Siam Square.

Traveling by Tuk-Tuk was fun and cheap (a bit hairy at times)My preferred mode of transport was the Tuk-Tuk, a three-wheeler scooter (like a Vespa) with a seat for two or three (small people) behind the driver. Have a look on the left and click to see the picture big! (She’s not picking her nose!)

June was a bit wary to start with but soon got the hang of it. They are everywhere and they charge nothing. For a couple of Baht (the monetary unit) one travels from place to place. Noisy and a bit scary at times but very quick and convenient.

The water taxis were something else. Through large parts of Bangkok you will find canals. On these you have water taxis. These are long boats that move at an incredible speed over the water. They stop at the “stations”, just like at a tram or railway station but then next to the river of course.

A Bangkok water taxi at a station People scramble on board and off it goes like a speed boat. The “conductors” who collect the fare (typically around 15 Euro cents) wear crash helmets lest they connect with a low bridge. They walk along the side of the boat like acrobats.

These things must move at 80km per hour. Even I found it little scary. I won’t tell you what June thought about them.
Once you are on you will find a rope next to some people. You pull that up to raise a sail cover to prevent you from getting sopping wet during the journey from the water spray (see right, click to see big).

We stayed in a little boutique hotel called the “Old Bangkok Inn”. This was very conveniently situated in the old part of the town where most of the sightseeing is done. Excellent service although a bit small. It only has eight rooms. We stayed in the “Lemon Grass” room.

The Royal Palace grounds in BangkokThe Royal Palace (Wat Phra Kaewat) on the river was incredible. The King does not live there any longer so one can visit every corner of this sprawling building. Actually that is wrong. It is not one building there are dozens of buildings. The most impressive was the Wat Phra Si Rattanasatsadaram , the temple of the “Emerald Budha”.

We have seen the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican and now the temple of the Emerald Buddha. I honestly cannot say which is the more beautiful of the two.
The art is so totally different and they are both breathtakingly beautiful.
However, the temple of the “Emerald Buddha” in Bangkok is certainly more impressive than anything I have seen before in my life.
In fact, when we came out and had put our shoes back on I said to June: “I just have to go back and see it again”.

And that is exactly what I did.

And so we are back home.

As I am sitting here typing away I look outside and see that it is snowing “cats and dogs”! Just the other day June said that we had not really had a winter yet. The temperatures have been so mild that at times I could work outside in the garden in a T-shirt!

Now, as I am sitting here many countries around us have been put on high alert. In Holland the trains will not be running during the day and in the UK they expect more than 3 000 schools to be closed!

Worthing Beach Road, February 2007Even the beach at Worthing (next to Brighton) in the UK was snowed under.

Everything is as white as you can imagine and it is beautiful!

Thank goodness I don’t have to go out today so I can just sit and watch from the inside out.
They don’t expect it to last long though. By the weekend it will be warm again. At least 7C!!
Life is slowly getting back to normal and we are already planning what to do this year for the holidays.
There is so much to see and so much to do and, it seems, so little time to do it all in. So we will keep on dreaming and take whatever next we are able to do as a blessing.

That leaves me with very little else to say so I wish you all of the best and we’ll speak again next month.

Take care,

Lo

 

 


Cats don’t come when they are called.
They take a message and get back to you later
[Unknown]

If a man says something in the woods and there are no women there, is he still wrong?

 

Just a thought

Why men are happier people


What do you expect when:

  • Your last name stays put.
  • The garage is all yours.
  • Wedding plans take care of themselves.
  • Chocolate is just another snack.
  • You can be President.
  • You can never be pregnant.
  • You can wear a white T-shirt to a water park.
  • You can wear NO shirt to a water park.
  • Car mechanics tell you the truth.
  • The world is your urinal.
  • Wrinkles add character.
  • People never stare at your chest when you’re talking to them.
  • The occasional well-rendered belch is practically expected.
  • New shoes don’t cut, blister, or mangle your feet.
  • Your underwear is R49.95 for a three-pack.
  • Three pairs of shoes are more than enough.
  • One mood all the time.
  • Phone conversations are over in 30 seconds flat.
  • A five-day vacation requires only one suitcase.
  • You can open all your own jars.
  • You get extra credit for the slightest act of thoughtfulness.
  • If someone forgets to invite you, he or she can still be your friend.
  • You are unable to see wrinkles in your clothes.
  • Everything on your face stays its original colour.
  • The same hairstyle lasts for years, maybe decades.
  • You only have to shave your face and neck.
  • You can play with toys all your life.
  • Your belly usually hides your big hips.
  • You can wear shorts no matter how your legs look.
  • You can “do” your nails with a pocket knife.
  • You have freedom of choice concerning growing a moustache
  • You can do Christmas shopping for 25 relatives on December 24 in 25 minutes.

No wonder men are happier!

Story of the month


The Braai unites South Africans!


The braai is surely the quintessential culinary experience in my country, South Africa. It’s an institution in households from Messina to Cape Town, bridging social and economic canyons, and even giving us a sense of our common identity.
On the surface, the braai (it rhymes with “eye”) is similar to a barbecue, but they should not be confused. The braai tradition is intimately intertwined with our laid-back, outdoor lifestyle. It has everything to do with the year-round sunny skies and temperate climate. It’s a ritual practiced in homes, restaurants, and camps, at game parks, on the beach, in the bush … pretty much wherever you find one or more of us.

Where there’s smoke, there’s fire; and where there’s fire outside in the gigantic deep freeze that is Boston in winter, you’re still likely to find a South African or two connecting with their roots, huddled around a hot grill. It might just be my wife, who is also South African, and me. Or we might include friends we’ve made since moving to Boston almost two years ago.

The word braai has many meanings. It can refer to the act of grilling (“please braai the meat now”); the equipment used (a grill is a braai to many South Africans); and the social occasion (“you’re invited to a braai“).

Braaing united peopleFor many of us, it is a rite of passage.
Some of my earliest memories are of watching my dad pile the wood on the grill and then experiencing the delight of setting the newspaper or kindling on fire with a match (or two or three). In slow steps – learn, then do – one is eventually allowed to participate in the act of braaing. By its very nature, nearly every braai became a unique father-son bonding experience. There was always something to learn, something to speak and joke about. Staring into a fire is strangely inspiring.

I learned quickly that it’s more art than science, as is apparent by these tips dad shared with me at an age when I could barely see over the top of the grill. First of all, he taught me, the heat should be spread evenly over the whole grill area. Second, a good indication of the correct heat is to hold your hand over the grid and count to 10. If you have to pull it back before then, it’s too hot. Any later, too cold. Third, you can always regulate the temperature by moving the grid up or down. It’s best to start high and move down as the coals become cooler. And finally, put the chicken or meat that needs to cook the longest on first. After the steaks are put on, add some thin pieces of wood to braai them in the flames. Vegetables such as potatoes in foil, onions, and squash are placed under the grid in the red-hot coals.

The “bring and braai” is the most popular kind of gathering and certainly Dad’s favorite. Similar to a potluck party, this is a grand social event where family and friends converge on a picnic spot or someone’s home with their own meat, salad, or side dish in hand. Meats are the star of the South African braai. They typically include marinated chicken, pork and lamb chops, steaks, sausages of different flavors and thickness, and when someone has really splurged, a rack or two of spareribs. Fish is also popular.

While the fire is lit and tended to, the kitchen (or makeshift kitchen) bustles with preparations: Vegetables are chopped or grated for salads, a large pot of cornmeal bubbles into “Krummel Pap,” and its accompanying Tomato and Onion Sauce slowly stews. (See recipes.)

As the meat comes off the fire, it is placed in a metal or ceramic roasting pan to stay warm. When all the meat is ready, the salads and side dishes are placed on tables and the feast begins.

At every braai hosted by the writer’s family, this traditional South African dish appears on the buffet table.

‘Krummel Pap’ (Crumbled Cornmeal) With Tomato and Onion Sauce’
2 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon salt
4 cups mieliemeel/cornmeal
In a large saucepan, add the butter and salt to 5 cups water, and bring to a boil. Take pot off burner, add cornmeal, and return to burner to cook over medium heat for 20 minutes without stirring. Continue to cook for about 15 more minutes, stirring with a fork until the consistency is loose and crumbly. Serve in large bowl alongside a smaller bowl of the sauce (recipe below). Serves 6.

Tomato and Onion sauce
2 tablespoons butter
1 large onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 (455 gram/28-ounce) can whole, peeled tomatoes
2 large fresh tomatoes, peeled and chopped
Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
In a saucepan, heat butter and sauté onion and garlic over high heat for about 3 minutes until onions are translucent and garlic is barely golden. Turn heat down to low, add remaining ingredients, and simmer for about 20 minutes, stirring frequently. If needed, add a tablespoon of sugar to sweeten. Spoon over Krummel Pap (above). Serves 6.


* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *
The South African Meat Industry Company,
Samic has very nice meat cutting charts.
Just click on the banner below for lots of interesting information.


 

Our Home Biltong Makers


Nothing compares with out Home Biltong Makers ……

Our Home Biltong makers have given many of our customers much joy and happiness and have brought many of them a little of “South Africa back in their homes.

It is so easy to make your own Biltong and it is ever so cost effective. In fact it only costs you just a fraction of the price you pay in the shop and, what is more important, you can make it just the way YOU like it.

Please read what these people had to say.


COMMENTS FROM BILTONG LOVERS AROUND THE WORLD!


Hi Guys,

Just a quick e-mail to say thank you for designing such a wonderful, compact machine.
Our biltong maker arrived on Monday and we are enjoying our first batch of biltong tonight and it is lekker!!
I will be off to the butchers first thing in the am to get some meat to make my second batch.

Regards
Hazel Lipsett
Falkirk, Scotland (08-02-2007)
kevinlipsett@hotmail.com


Hi Biltong Team,

My wife bought me a 5 kg biltong maker and some Safari Biltong Spice for Christmas.
I have just finished eating the results of my first batch of biltong and boy was it “lekker”!! It has made me a bit home sick.
I shared some of it with a South African friend of mine and he also loved it. Now have started my second batch today and just can’t wait to taste it.
It is really great to have biltong readily available here in Northern Ireland. My local butcher is going to make me some wors next week to dry in my biltong maker.

I also want to thank Lo for his patience in answering all my questions about making biltong and for all the advice and help he has given me.

Thanks again!
Richard Strapp
Belfast, Northern Ireland (11-01-2007)
richardstrapp@googlemail.com


Hello Biltong Makers,

I received my Rockey’s 5kg Biltong Maker last week and everything arrived in perfect condition.
It was immediately put to work and I have just sampled my first ever attempt at Biltong making.
The results are simply fantastic so I will probably have the lot finished before my South African wife gets home from work.
Thanks for the great service and fantastic item.

Regards,
Colin Rennie
Chance Inn, England (13-12-2006)
ColinRennie@aol.com


Hi Biltong Team,

Well, where do I start!
Firstly thanks for the prompt delivery. One huge problem is that I bought a machine that is too small!
I can’t keep up with the demand from “FRIENDS”. I think I need at least 4 machines so that I can have biltong available EVERYDAY!
As far as everybody is concerned my biltong is WOW fantastic, and I can’t keep up with the demand …………. must definitely start charging my friends, could make a fortune!

Thanks for everything
Melville Cook
Ireland (20-11-2006)
melvillecook@eircom.net


And so more and more people keep on telling us how fantastic it is to make your own biltong! You can read loads more of what people are saying (we only started keeping records in 2001) on our customers comments page.

So, to all of you who have not tried it yet, now is the time!

ESPECIALLY WITH THE SPECIALS WE HAVE THIS MONTH! (SEE BELOW!)

The most popular Home Biltong Maker in the world!You too could be making your own Biltong in a very short space of time.
Have a look at our Home Biltong Makers and see how easy it is!!

Details on ROCKEY’S 5kg Home Biltong Maker can be found by clicking on this link.

It's as easy as 1-2-3 to make your own Biltong!

You can have a look at the BILTONG BUDDY here.

This month’s specials


Some early 2007 specials!

We are running a bit low on the Rockey’s 5kg machines so make use of this opportunity!

Until the 15th 28th of February 2007 (or until present stocks last) the following pricing will apply:

 

BILTONG BUDDY Biltong Maker
R 750.00
R 695.00
ROCKEY’S 5kg Biltong Maker
R 950.00
R 795.00
SI-30 – 30kg Drying Cabinet (Semi-Industrial)
R 5995.00
R 4995.00
Wooden Blackwood Biltong Cutter
R 390.00
R 290.00
Semi-Industrial Biltong Shredder (hand model)
R 1495.00
R 995.00

Click here to go to our on-line shop.

Tips of the month


Here are some useful cheap telephone tips

There is a new phone service in South Africa called SKAAP.
It is for South Africans living in South Africa.
They charge 20 cents per minute for a call to the USA and it can be done from a normal/landline telephone.

All the information is on their website www.skaap.com

 



Here is another way to make cheap calls.
This one was sent to us by Tim Morris from Johannesburg – tnorris@notesafrica.co.za

All you do is dial 084 198 0000 from any cell phone or land-line, wait for the voice prompt and then dial the international number you require with all the codes – for example 09 44 …….. for the UK.
There is no sign-up, no subscription, no waiting and no risk – you use the same number for any country – 084 198 0000.

Please allow us to very quickly introduce you to Talking Point, a new product being introduced to South Africa by VoIPLus.
VoIPLus is a brand new way of saving yourself a lot of money when making international calls from South Africa. You can call a normal/landline telephone almost anywhere in the world, Europe, USA, UK, India, China ….. from any landline, switchboard or cellphone and it will not cost you more than R2.85 per minute (standard VAS rates apply).

There is not going to be a huge market blitz; that’s why we can keep the prices so low. So we are relying on you to put it on your cellphones as a speed-dial, to tell all your friends (don’t tell your enemies – let them continue paying huge amounts for their international calls – grin!)

Tell your boss, your colleagues and your customers; tell your office manager so your telephone least-cost routing system can be re-programmed, and if you have a company website, pop a small notice on there too.
You are at the computer now – so forward this to everyone you know. Do it now! Otherwise you may forget and the next time you call overseas you won’t have our 084 198 0000 number to hand.

If you would like to contact us about anything, please feel free do do so via email at CustomerCare@voiplus.co.za.

 



South African Meat Cutting Charts


Below you will find three meat cutting charts.

These are displayed with the compliments of SAMIC.
(The South African Meat Industry Company).
SAMIC has a very interesting web site as well as a weekly newsletter about anything to do with the
Meat Industry in South Africa.
Now, don’t think this is a totally boring web site (I thought so first) but it has some very interesting articles and statistics.


Beef Cutting Chart
Pork Cutting Chart
Lamb Cutting Chart




English Meat Cutting Charts

These charts you find here are very detailed also showing what you can do with the different cuts.

They come from EBLEX
(English Beef and Lamb Executive)

They have a fun web site at www.beefyandlamby.co.uk with loads of excellent recipes to boot!
A site really worth visiting!
For the cutting charts click on the links below

UK Beef Cuts
UK Lamb Cuts
* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *

South African Musical and other Events in Europe


For all upcoming shows by South African artists please click on the South African events web site link below.
There are a host of South African artists coming to Europe in the next couple of weeks.

Amongst those are;

  • Gert Vlok Nel (Nijmegen and Tilburg, Holland)
  • Koos Kombuis (Aardvark Pub, London)
  • Tidal Waves (Festival, Estival in Braschaat, Belgium)
  • HA!Man (Holland, Belgium, France)
  • Jan Blohm (Boom, Antwerp)
  • Amanda Strydom (Den Bosch and Hoogeveen, Holland)

To see all upcoming events please click on South African Events in Europe web site. There are loads of things happening!

Questions and Answers


Like every month, here is our regular section on the many questions we receive from our readers all over the world.
If we have not given an answer and you can help these people could you please mail them?
(Please copy us in on your mails @
info@biltongmakers.com
so we can help other people who might have the same questions in the future)


QUESTION

Could you please inform me why there is no fan in the Biltong makers for home use?
I live in the Netherlands and discovered fungus growing on my home made Biltong. I hang it to dry in a self made wooden box with a 40 watt light globe.
I thought it was the absence of a wind fan that was the cause of the fungus.

Ronald Vanheeringen
Holland
r.vanheeringen@gmail.com

 



QUESTION

Ek is opsoek na skaapkop gildes resepte – en hoe maak jy hom gaar. Hoop julle kan help met n website of iets.

dankie baie
Jurie Louw
Namibia
Jurie.Louw@TransNamib.com.na

 



QUESTION

A lot of our customers ask the question if our spices are allowed in to Australia. We have had one instance years ago where an Australian customs official asked for a written list of the contents of the spices. After this was mailed through to them the spices were released without a problem.

The questions is:
Has anyone ever had any problems getting our spices in to Australia?

Please let us know so we can assure future customers.

Many thanks,
The Biltong Team
webmaster@biltongmakers.com

 

Stoep Talk

It’s not that difficult to laugh at ourselves
By James ClarkeTo be able to utter a good insult – and I mean a really good one – is, like muesli, good for you.

South African journalist, Dr Sarah Britten, has come out with a fascinating book – The Art of the South African Insult (30° South Publishers) which is a hilarious analysis of our national heritage of great insults going back 350 years.

Among the gentler ones: “You know you’re in Kakamas when you have no idea where you are.” And Josef Talotta’s description of Johannesburg’s Northern Suburbs: Kugel National Park.

I liked Britten’s frontis piece showing two Hottentots watching an approaching Dutch galleon. One is saying, “Shit!” which, in a way, is what followed.

The Hottentot’s expletive probably wasn’t this country’s first interracial insult. I fancy it began when Mrs Ples watched the more-upright-than-thou Homo habalises move in next door with their la-de-da talk about the etiquette of serving grandma’s leg, left over from the weekend roast, to guests without at least warming it.

Some South Africans are quite brilliant at insults. Britten says, “The average bergie in Cape Town comes up with better lines during one morning of sorting through the dustbins in Obs than a star on the bill at the Montreal Comedy Festival does in a month of snorting coke”.

South Africans, she says, are very good at calling each other names for “we are, after all, a bunch of Dutchmen and Souties, Charras and Hotnots, Shangaans and the Xhoza Nostra, Bushies and Afs, Goms, Porras, Lebs, Crunchies, Zots, Mlungus, Japies…” The list goes on.

“It’s what defines us a nation,” she says.

Strangely she misses out “Hairies”, but the list is worthy of Roget’s Thesaurus. Britten’s book, frivolous though it might sound and hilarious though it is in parts, is an important piece of Africana.

There’s a glimpse of how the 17th century Dutch settlers viewed the locals. In 1652 somebody wrote, “They all smell fiercely, as can be noticed at a difference of more than twelve feet against the wind.”

Britten comments, “The smell must have been impressive, given that the European visitors themselves were hardly poster boys for personal hygiene.”

This is no cheapo collection of insults whose variety becomes tedious like a book of jokes. It is a very readable 314 page book, written with delicious humour, about the way we have traditionally insulted each other.

It’s the kind of book that compels one to constantly disturb one’s partner’s reverie with, “Hey, you’ve just got to hear this…”

In a chapter on the historical course of ethnic insults she quotes from a 1927 copy of the Sunday Times, this being 25-years after the war between the Blerrie Rooinekke and the Stupid Dutchmen.

The newspaper pleads for reconciliation saying how pleasantly surprised the two “races” would be if they just tried to make friends.

This, says Britten, whose irreverence is always near the surface, was when the Rainbow Nation was still in black and white.

One section titled “We didn’t invent racism, we just perfected it” reminds us how official notices in the apartheid years created there own brand of breathtakingly callous insults.

In 1959 Jan Smuts Airport (as it was then) changed the signs reading “Europeans” and “Non-Europeans”, to “Whites” and “Non-Whites” – it was to avoid confusing incoming Americans who considered themselves “Non-Europeans”.

The New South Africa gets an equal drubbing: “You know you are in South Africa when the police are the first on the scene for most major crimes, without being called.”

It’s sometimes difficult to laugh at ourselves and you’ll sometimes cringe. But mostly you’ll be amused – that’s what it’s for.

Recipe Corner


Deboned leg of Lamb

Yummy!!!Your shopping list

  • 2 kg de-boned leg of lamb
  • 30 ml cooking oil (or olive oil)
  • 3 onions, chopped
  • 2-3 cloves of garlic, crushed
  • 1.5 Bottles Knorr Sparerib Marinade
  • 1-2 cups red wine
  • 1/2 packet Aromat
  • Salt
  • Pepper


What to do

  • Heat oil in pot
  • Add seasoned meat
  • Brown all round
  • Remove from pot and set aside
  • Fry onions, garlic until tender
  • Add the meat
  • Season with the aromat
  • Add Knorr sparerib marinade (depending on how much gravy you require)
  • Add red wine
  • Cover and simmer for 1.5 – 2 hours until tender


Serve with rice and veggies in season.
Serves 6 – 8

Enjoy,

Merlene Roberts

 



Click below for our handy cooking converter
Our handy cooking converter
Stories from South Africa


If it is any consolation …….

They were the most disreputable bunch of “car guards” you ever saw, staggering around drunkenly and commenting obscenely about one another’s mothers.

Most of them had acquired from somewhere luminous yellow, if grubby, bibs.

“Don’t worry, boss, we’ll look after your car,” one of them called, as we walked through the low dunes to the sea at Muizenberg’s Sunrise Beach. It was just after 6pm and we were having a quick bathe before going on to friends at the Marina da Gama.

When we emerged from the water, our towels were still on the beach but my hat, spectacles and car keys had vanished. So, naturally, had the car.

“Is your car gone?” screeched a woman guard. “I knew it was your car. I said to those boys, it’s not your car, it’s that other gentleman’s car, but they just drove off. They’re a lot of skollies, man. Ag shame, now you haven’t got a car. Better phone the police.”

Instead we borrowed another family’s cell phone to call our Marina friend, who picked us up and drove us to Muizenberg police station. I had difficulty engaging the constable’s attention.

It’s always difficult without spectacles, when you can’t see far enough to catch a person’s eye. I also felt, wearing only a costume, I wasn’t dressed for the occasion.

Finally a policewoman sympathized with our predicament: “Your car stolen from Sunrise Beach, hey? You’re the second person this evening. It’s the in-thing to steal cars there at the moment.”

In due course, having put out an alert for the car, a constable began the laborious process of filling in umpteen forms.

Every few minutes he would interrupt himself to answer the phone or jump up to attend to something more urgent.

We’d been there more than an hour, shivering in just our costumes, when he answered the phone yet again and returned to say the car had been found, undamaged, by the Grassy Park police.

Actually it had been found by a very civic-minded resident of Lotus River, who became suspicious when he saw three youths park the car near his home and walk off with various items. So he phoned the local police who put a guard on it, a real one this time, until we arrived.

“Do you want to lay a charge?” asked the Muizenberg constable anxiously.

“Against whom?” I asked.

If I did, it would mean having the car impounded for finger-printing and other procedures, he said.

It would also mean he would have to go on completing lots of documents.

He was hugely relieved when I told him to forget the charges, I was just happy to have the car back.

As we left Muizenberg police station, we met another couple walking up the hill. “Our car’s been stolen from Sunrise Beach,” said the woman.

“Yours is the third this evening,” I said. “If it’s any comfort, car thefts there are the in-thing.”

(We saw this in the papers, it was written by John Scott 14-02-2007)

Around the World


Bits and Bobs from people around the world

 

This was the only story coming from you, our readers. Are there no nice things to say about South Africa anymore?
Let’s see if someone, somewhere can come up with something positive. It does not have to be about South Africa. Let’s hear from you, about your life as an expat perhaps, living somewhere in this big wide world -Ed.
 



Die Regering en Misdaad

Ek het baie lank gelede in hierdie geselsbrief beduie dat die misdaad in Suid-Afrika vir die regering die gans is wat die goue eiers lê. Toe kry ek in verlede week die onderstaande e-pos wat oor dieselfde onderwerp handel:

Hierdie is ook ‘n interessante artikel – die onderwerp het ons almal al een of ander tyd om ‘n kuiertjie bespreek…..lees dit gerus!

Nadat ek ‘n slagoffer van misdaad was in 2000, het ek ‘n duisend of meer misdaad-vergaderings, beprekings, dinkskrums, konferensies, ens bygewoon.
En by elke geleentheid gesit en luister hoe mense daarna streef om die simptome van misdaad die stryd aan te sê. Maar die een vraag wat niemand gevra het nie, was dit: Wat is die invloed van misdaad op die regering van Suid-Afrika? Meeste mense antwoord “niks”, en hulle is verkeerd.
Ek het Priora Forum gestig net nadat ons aangeval was. Priora is ‘n Latynse woord wat, vertaal, beteken: “Met die voorafgaande feite.” Hier is ‘n paar daarvan:

Misdaad genereer vir die regering van Suid-Afrika miljoene der miljoene rande!!!! Kom ons kyk na ‘n paar voorbeelde, as u my sou vergun.
Een miljoen huiseienaars in Gauteng (1 provinsie uit 9) maak gebruik van die dienste van ‘n gewapende reaksie-mag (let wel, nie ‘n misdaadvoorkomings-mag nie, slegs een wat kan reageer nadat die misdaad plaasgevind het). Die dienste van so ‘n mag beloop gemiddeld R240,00 per maand per huishouding. Die eenvoudige berekening wat hierop volg is dit: 1 000 000 x R240,00 x 12 maande x 14% BTW genereer vir die regering ongeveer R403 miljoen se BTW as ‘n direkte gevolg van misdaad.

Nog ‘n voorbeeld:
‘n Motordief steel ‘n R500 000 weelde-motor. Vir hierdie daad ontvang hy R10 000,00, R20 000,00 of selfs R30 000,00? Die eienaar van die voertuig word uitbetaal deur sy versekeraar en vervang die gesteelde voertuig met ‘n soortgelyke een van dieselfde waarde.
Hierdeur ontvang die regering R61 403,51 se BTW op die transaksie as ‘n direkte gevolg van misdaad. Wie het nou ‘n groter finansiële voordeel getrek uit hierdie diefstal? Die dief, of die regering?

Ek dink langer as wat my neus lank is, en ek hoop so en werk so hard daaraan om nog sulke denkendes bymekaar te kry. Dan moet ons begin soek na ‘n meganisme waarmee ons die regering van die dag kan motiveer om hierdie onkonstitusionele en immorele inkomste as ‘n direkte gevolg van misdaad prys te gee.
Alle denkende Suid-Afrikaners behoort te eis dat alle uitgawes tot selfbeskerming van eiendom en lewe nie net teen ‘n 0% BTW koers aangeslaan word nie, maar ook belastingaftrekbaar moet wees, selfs vir die salaristrekker. Dan behoort ons te eis dat alle vervanging van gesteelde eiendom teen ‘n 0% BTW-koers moet kan plaasvind, en dan behoort ons te eis dat, indien ‘n persoon te sterwe kom as gevolg van ‘n misdadige aksie, so ‘n persoon se boedel kwytgeskeld moet word van alle vorms van boedelbelasting.
Het iemand al ooit gevra wat die regering se boedelbelastinginkomste was as ‘n direkte gevolg van die +/- 1300 boere wat in Suid-Afrika vermoor is?

Die regering hou daarvan om Suid-Afrika met oorsee te vergelyk. Wel oorsee is jou sekuriteit en veiligheid gedek deur die belasting wat jy betaal en alle sekuriteitsmaatreëls wat jy tref se uitgawes is van belasting aftrekbaar.

Sodra “denkende” Suid-Afrikaners begin om die regering van die dag se “inkomste” as ‘n direkte gevolg van misdaad terug te eis, sal u sien hoe gou daar iets gedoen word aan die misdaad. Intussen bly dit die gans wat die goue eiers lê, terwyl ons onsself blind staar teen “wat kan ons doen om die misdaad (se simptome) van ons deure af weg te hou!”

Is dit nie ook onregverdig dat slagoffers van geweld en motorkapings – deur die regering se beskermde kriminele – self hulle mediese onkostes moet dra nie. Die regering behoort die slagoffers van geweldsmisdaad se mediese rekeninge te betaal! Wie betaal vir die berading van gesinne wat geraak word deur plaasmoorde?

Komaan, Suid-Afrika, vra die regte vrae, en dring aan op die regte antwoorde.

Christa Oelofse
+27 83 259 4933

 



Mbeki vows to battle crime

President Thabo Mbeki has given the nation what many have been crying for, an acknowledgement that crime is a problem and it is affecting the very fabric of South African society. He acknowledged that the fight against it needed to be stepped up and provided concrete examples of how the war against crime would be stepped up several gears.

“Certainly we cannot erase that which is ugly and repulsive and claim the happiness that comes with freedom if communities live in fear, closeted behind walls and barbed wire, ever anxious in their houses, on the streets and on our roads, unable freely to enjoy our public spaces,” he said in his state of the nation address.”

While strides had been made and some targets surpassed, including employing 152 000 police officers, “we recognise the fact that the impact of this is not high enough for everybody to feel a better sense of safety and security”.

Mbeki acknowledged that the incidence of most contact crime had been reduced, but that the annual reduction rate in categories such as robbery, assault and murder, was still below the 7 to 10 percent that had been targeted.

The abuse of women and children continued at an unacceptable level, he said. He noted that last year’s security workers’ strike had brought home to all South Africans that the industry could not be handled simply as a private affair or the private sector. The regulatory system was inadequate and would be reviewed this year, Mbeki announced.

“In addition to improving the work of the police, we can – together with the private security industry – create an environment in which the security expectations of the public, in which huge resources are expended, are actually met”.

Mbeki’s ninth and last state of the nation address was delivered at a time of heightened debate about crime and his perceived indifference to how it affects all South Africans. The president called for “an enduring partnership in actual practice within our communities and between the communities and the police, to make life more and more difficult for the criminals”.

Mbeki said he was heartened by the resolve shown by business and religious leaders to strengthen such partnerships on the ground, and to give of their time and resources to strengthen the fight against crime. “Government will play its part to ensure that these partnerships actually work, and that we all act together to discharge the responsibility to protect our citizens.” www.thestar.co.za

Angela Quintal

 

Something to smile about


How to handle creditors

Dear Sir/Madam,I acknowledge receipt of your letter dated September, 12 in which for the third time you request that I pay the monies owed to you. I first want you to know that by no means do I dispute my debt and I intend to reimburse you as soon as possible.

However, I bring to your attention that I have many more creditors, quite as honourable as you, and whom I wish to reimburse too. That is why, each month, I throw all the names of my creditors into a hat and draw one randomly whom I hasten to refund immediately. I hope that yours will come out shortly.

Sincerely yours,
Christopher Fisher

PS: I have great regret in informing you that given the unceremonious tone of your last letter, you will not be taking part in the next three draws.


Chicken at a Chinese restaurant

A couple go for a meal at a Chinese restaurant and order the “Chicken Surprise”. The waiter brings the meal, served in a lidded cast iron pot.
Just as the wife is about to serve herself, the lid of the pot rises slightly and she briefly sees two beady little eyes looking around before the lid slams back down.
“Good grief, did you see that?” she asks her husband.
He hasn’t, so she asks him to look in the pot. He reaches for it and again the lid rises, and he sees two little eyes looking around before it slams down.
Rather perturbed, he calls the waiter over, explains what is happening, and demands an explanation.
“Please sir,” says the waiter, “what you order?”
The husband replies, “Chicken Surprise.”
Ah… so sorry,” says the waiter, “I bring you Peeking Duck”


Self Analysis

It doesn’t hurt to take a hard look at yourself from time to time, and this should help get you started…

During a visit to the Mental Asylum, a visitor asked the Director what the  criterion was which defined whether or not a patient should be institutionalized.
“Well,” said the Director, “we fill up a bathtub, then we offer a teaspoon,a teacup and a bucket to the patient and ask him or her to empty the bathtub.”
“Oh, I understand,” said the visitor. “A normal person would use the bucket because it’s bigger than the spoon or the teacup.”
“No.” said the Director, “A normal person would pull the plug. Do you want a room with or without a view?”

Sport talk


Snippets from the papers

Skinstad returns to the Shark tank
Bob Skinstad is hoping to pull off one of the biggest comebacks in South African rugby history by joining the Sharks for their Super 14 clash against the Highlanders.
Full Story ….

Proteas like the view from the top
Australia’s 10-wicket loss to New Zealand in the first match of the Chappell-Hadlee ODI series has given the South African cricketers plenty to smile about…
Full Story ….

Mbeki leaves Rev Meshoe flat-footed on 2010
President Thabo Mbeki has down played Reverend Kenneth Meshoe’s statements that violent crime might impact on the 2010 World Cup.
Full Story ….

Durban 2010 stadium work goes on ….
The consortium challenging Durban’s R2-billion World Cup soccer stadium contract is intent on having the tender award overturned – but it has backed off from any legal challenges that would delay construction and jeopardise Durban’s position as a host city.
Full Story ….



-Where can you watch rugby on TV?-
Click here to find out where in most countries!
Let’s hear from you too!!


Let’s make the next issue a Bumper one!

It is only halfway through February so why not join us and make the next newsletter a real bumper one! You are probably sitting at the computer right now so how about it. Let our readers enjoy your story!
It does not have to be about Biltong or such. We’d love to hear where you live and how you have adapted yourself to your new life style and surroundings.

You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask?
Perhaps you have some advice to give?

You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Share it with other people around the world!

Boerewors in Europe


Boerewors (Europe only, sorry people!)

We know it is a bit early in the year but we still can’t keep up with orders for boerewors. Either there are some real die-hards out there who braai in the snow or you guys are having it for breakfast, lunch and supper!
It is disappearing faster than we can make it! Nevertheless, we have fresh stock available most of the time.
Boeries on the braai!
So if you need Boerewors just email us or call. You can either collect or we can mail it to you.
All our customers in Holland, Belgium and in fact, all over Europe are raving about the packing of and the condition in which the wors arrived at their doorsteps.

Just imagine some “lekker” pap and wors with a nice tomato and onion sauce!

Just give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.

Our Boerewors is vacuum packed in quantities of about 500 gram.
The normal price is € 8.45 per kg but for the time being we will keep it at only € 7.95 per kg!!

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Droëwors for the UK and Europe!


Droëwors …… a typical South African delicacy all of its own!

Droëwors, as it is known in South Africa, is as much part of the country’s culinary culture as Biltong, Pap, Boerewors and Potjiekos.
Real South African Droë Wors!The spices are of course imported especially from South Africa so you will get the “real” thing!
Unfortunately we are all sold out right now. The droëwors was sold within a week of the announcement of the special pricing! But ….. please place your advance orders for the next batches to make sure you don’t lose out!!

Fresh droëwors will be available again from the middle of March.

The price will be € 28.00 per kg or € 7.00 per 250 gram packet.

Droëwors travels well and posting is an ideal option.
We can mail it to you in Europe and the UK via priority mail in minimum quantities of 1 kg.
See all the mailing rates by going to www.boerewors.be

Interested? Give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25 or email.

Lamb on the Spit


Lamb on the Spit ……. something special!

Spring will be upon us before we know it and with it the chance to braai again!

Lamb on the Spit is a way of entertaining as only known by very few mainly because it is thought to be very expensive ……. Not so!

Click to see me big!We will do a lamb on the Spit for parties of between 30 and 50 people for just € 18.00 and € 15.00 a head respectively.

Together with the lamb we will treat you to a big pot of curried potatoes as well as a choice between a pasta salad or three-bean salad. Garlic or bread rolls are included as well.
For venues more than 50 km from our home base in Keerbergen there is a small transport fee.
Start planning now for the Spring next Summer! It will be upon us before we know it. Just keep in mind that quite a number of dates in May and June are already booked!
Remember that we are doing these functions only during weekends.

 

Booking early is essential and you can do so on
+32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.

(A Lamb on the Spit can only be done outside because we cook on coals!)


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Previous issues of our Newsletter


You can click on the links below to view some of the previous issues of our newsletter.

 

 

February 2006
March 2006
April 2006
May 2006
June 2006
July 2006
August 2006
September 2006
October 2006
November 2006
December 2006
January 2007


Subscribing and Unsubscribing

Perhaps you would like to subscribe to this newsletter or tell a friend about Biltongmakers.Com! and the incredible Biltong Makers!! You can be included in this newsletter by clicking on the following link.
Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!
If you prefer not to receive email from us, you can unsubscribe from Biltongmakers.Com! by clicking on this link.
Unsubscribe me please.

December 2006

 

The home of Biltong, Boerewors, Potjiekos and much, much more!


Click here to find out more!

The Biltongmakers.Com Newsletter
December 2006
You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
If you do not wish to receive this newsletter you may unsubscribe at the bottom where you will find an automatic email link. Just click on that and send. Your name will then be permanently deleted from our database.
If you, your family or your friends want to subscribe to the newsletter please click on this link.

Yes, please subscribe me to your monthly Newsletter!
In this Newsletter

 

 

From the editor

DISCLAIMER

The information and contributions contained in this newsletter are received from various readers local and international. Views and opinions reflected in our newsletter are not necessarily those of Biltongmakers.Com and its team members.


Keerbergen
Belgium
December 2006The wind is howling outside. It is real autumn weather outside. Drizzle, wind, loads of leaves blowing all over the place.
And yet …….. It’s warm enough to put on a pair of shorts and have a go in the garden. It got close to 20C today and, even with the wind, it is lovely to be outside.

Not so for the wicked though. They have to work at newsletters and be holed up behind double glazing and suffer the coziness of being inside!

I am early this month. It’s only the 25th of November and the December issue is just about finished.

Yesterday was Kel’s birthday. Bless his soul. He would have been 64 this year. It is still such a strange feeling to know that he is no longer amongst us. No more quick telephone calls or an email ……..
Rest in peace my friend.


Holiday closure

It is December and we are very much looking forward to our trip to Singapore and Bangkok. It’s only a couple of weeks before we go!

At this stage I must mention that we will be closing the offices from December 19th till January 9th. It sounds strange. Closing up! I cannot remember that we have ever closed up before and this holiday will certainly be the longest I can remember taking.

But it’s time to recharge the old batteries!

Our on-line shop (accessible from all the pages on our web site) will remain open of course and all orders will be processed and shipped as normal. However, manual and PayPal order requests as well as any queries or emails to Biltongmakers.Com will have to wait till early January for a reply.

To be honest, we don’t really want to spend our holidays behind a computer. I’m sure you don’t mind!



Let’s see you on our GuestMap!

We have recently expanded our GuestMap to take more names of our Biltong making friends all over the world. Please feel free to place your pin and tell us a little about whatever.

If you did place your pin in the past please do so again. I think that the guys in the US might have lost some of the info.

If you find one map a bit full just click on the “go back” button in the left-hand top corner of the map till you find an empty one.


Superb Biltong in the UK

At the end of November we took a couple of days to visit family and some customers in the UK. Bishop's Waltham near Southampton
It was very nice to finally meet up with Andrew Grover from Bishop’s Waltham Butchery near Southampton.

What an incredibly superb and clean shop Andrew has. When you walk in there you just feel welcome and you just want to buy all that lovely fresh looking meat! Driving into the little village was like being taken back in time.
What a lovely part of England that is.

Biltong in the window!As we walked up to Andrew’s shop we saw to our surprise a window full of biltong and droëwors hanging from a rod. Just like back in South Africa!

Andrew bought the small industrial biltong drying cabinet (30kg) some time ago and I must say his biltong compares with the best I have ever tasted.

When June tasted his droëwors she said:”Now that’s how I like it. Absolutely perfect!” I must say that June does not like my droëwors very much because it has a little too much fat in it to her liking and it is always ever so slightly wettish.

Hey, but I digress. Have a look at the pictures and judge for yourself. (Click on them to see them big)

If you want biltong or droëwors just give Andrew a call. His number is 01489 891937. Biltong for AfricaYou can also visit his web site at www.bw-butchers.co.uk or email him at andrew@bwbutchers.co.uk

I have tasted a lot of biltong in England, some of it from very reputable South African shops and it has always been from so-so to inedible.

Andrew’s biltong is perfect and you can order it with or without fat and from wettish to very dry! And at an incredible price too!!


We also met up with Aris Stathakis.
Aris is the distributor for our Home Biltong Makers in the UK. He has ample stock and delivery is of course much quicker than sending it all the way from South Africa! Aris was the very first person to have a web site about biltong.
You can visit his on-line shop at www.biltongbox.com


My last stop in the UK was a visit to the London Eye.
There were two of us. The London Eye
We drove to the most southern tube station in London and parked the car.
Apart from the congestion charge it is madness to drive in to London. It’s much quicker and easier by tube.
We took the tube to Waterloo station and were immediately transported back to South Africa. There were South Africans everywhere waving flags (old and new) with funny hats and all rearing to go to Twickenham of course! (Don’t know where all the Castle Beers came from!) Up, up and away!

Now, those of you who have been to the London Eye know that it seldom stops. Perhaps for a couple of seconds or so but normally you will climb on and off while it runs.
We have the dubious honor to belong to a very select and very small club who stopped the London Eye for at least 10 minutes that day.

I will not go into detail.

The view was incredible though!

And so it is almost Christmas and another New Year is on the horizon and all that remains for us is to wish all of you a very happy Christmas and a prosperous, healthy and, above all, peaceful New Year.

All the best,

Lo

 

 


There is not enough darkness in the whole world to extinguish the light of a small candle.
[Unknown]

Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn’t have to do it himself
[A H Weiler]

 

A Christmas reflection

This Christmas from all of us at here to all our friends all over the world.
Just a moment of reflection ………
.
[We have all read this one time or another but just pause for a moment, and read it again ……]


Desiderata

Go placidly amid the noise and the haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence.

As far as possible, without surrender, be on good terms with all persons.
Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even to the dull and the ignorant; they too have their story.
Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit.

If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain or bitter, for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.
Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans.
Keep interested in your own career, however humble;
it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time.

Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery.
But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals, and everywhere life is full of heroism.
Be yourself.
Especially do not feign affection.
Neither be cynical about love, for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment, it is as perennial as the grass.

Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth.
Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune.
But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings.
Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.

Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself.
You are a child of the universe no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here.
And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.

Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be.
And whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life, keep peace in your soul.

With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world.
Be cheerful.
Strive to be happy.

Story of the month


The History and Tradition of Christmas Pudding

Does your Christmas dinner include a Christmas Pudding?

If you lived in England, the absence of this delectable dessert from the holiday table would raise a few eyebrows.
The pudding is the most special part of the meal, although families alter the way it’s cooked and presented to create their own unique traditions.
Originally the Christmas Pudding was referred to as hakin because of its multitude of ingredients.

The first recipes of this pudding came from the Middle Ages.
The ingredients for mince pie, as it was then called, were chopped poultry, pheasant, partridge, and rabbit.
Later sugar, apples, raisins, and candied oranges and lemons were added.

Another form of Christmas pudding called porridge or frumenty surfaced in the 14th century. Ingredients included beef, mutton, raisins, currents, prunes, wine, and mixed spices.

It was a soup-like fasting dish eaten before the Christmas celebrations commenced.
In 1595, spirits, dried fruit, eggs, and bread crumbs were added to the recipe and it became plum pudding. In 1664, it was banned by the Puritans as a lewd custom unfit for people who followed the ways of God.

In 1714, King George I re-established pudding as part of the Christmas feast even though the Quakers strongly objected. Meat was eliminated from the recipe in the 17th century in favor of more sweets, and people began sprinkling it with brandy and setting it aflame when serving it to their guests.

The Christmas pudding was not a tradition in England until it was introduced to the Victorians by Prince Albert.
By this time the pudding looked and tasted as it does today.

The traditional cooking time takes about eight hours, with preparation taking even longer due to extensive marinating. The longer the fruit is marinated in brandy, cider, or both, the better it tastes and this could take weeks!

There are many traditions and superstitions surrounding the Christmas Pudding.
Some traditions say to make the pudding by the 25th Sunday after Trinity, with 13 ingredients to represent Christ and His Disciples.
Every member of the family is to take a turn stirring the pudding with a wooden spoon from east to west, in honor of the three kings.

It is said that setting the brandy aflame represents Christ’s passion.
A sprig of holly as garnish is a reminder if His ‘Crown of Thorns.’ Holly supposedly brought good luck and had special healing powers.
It was often planted near houses in the belief that it protected the inhabitants.

Some families add coins to the pudding for luck. Everyone then stirs the pudding and makes a wish. Those who get the coins in their serving get wealth, health, happiness, and their wish will come true. Some people even add gold rings to the mix to indicate the finder will get married in the coming year.
A tradition that died out due to its depressing nature, was the addition of thimbles or buttons to the pudding. This signaled that the finder would remain a spinster or bachelor forever.

One last interesting fact about Christmas pudding is that the largest batch ever made weighed in at 7,231 pounds and was made in Aughton, Lancashire on July 11, 1992. Imagine trying to finish that plate!

Click here for Mrs Mackie’s Christmas Pudding Recipe
(Not that it will help any this year though. Christmas pudding should be made months before the time -Ed)

* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *
The South African Meat Industry Company,
Samic has very nice meat cutting charts.
Just click on the banner below for lots of interesting information.


 

Our Home Biltong Makers


Thank you!

Hey people. There have been such nice compliments flying around from so many people that we don’t know where to start thanking all of you.

It does us so good (dit gee ons ‘n groot lekker kry) to see that there are so many of you who so much enjoy making your own biltong and wors. It is so nice to hear from you and how you are doing.

This web site is really about bringing some of your “old home” back to where-ever you may be in this world right now and we hope that we, in a small way, succeed in doing so.

It is your mails overflowing with enthusiasm about how you made your own biltong and wors that keeps us going.

So, from us, a great thank you. And keep those mails coming!

There is one feedback that really took the cake. It came from John Renwick, some time ago …….

John wrote:

Yesterday afternoon, after three days, I tested my first batch. Brilliant!!

This is the first time I’ve had biltong since 1986 so you can imagine how pleased I am!

I thought I’d died and gone to heaven!

So, to all of you who have not tried it yet, now is the time!

The most popular Home Biltong Maker in the world!You too could be making your own Biltong in a very short space of time.
Have a look at our Home Biltong Makers and see how easy it is!!

Details on ROCKEY’S 5kg Home Biltong Maker can be found by clicking on this link.

It's as easy as 1-2-3 to make your own Biltong!

You can have a look at the BILTONG BUDDY here.

This month’s specials

Christmas is now around the corner …..

But ….. even with Christmas gone you will still be able to benefit from these special prices and something free!

The first 10 orders received after this newsletter has been mailed will receive one of our famous blackwood Biltong Cutters totally FREE!!

So don’t wait and go shopping now!

There is still time to have your Biltong Maker delivered before Christmas but only if you place your order now!!

As an extra bonus to end this year off on a high note the following prices will apply:

Rockey’s incredible 5kg Home Biltong Maker still @ only R 850.00! (Normal retail is R 950.00).
The unbeatable Biltong Buddy (2kg) @ still only R 695.00! (Normal retail is R 750.00).

Make use of this opportunity and ask for surface mail! It costs a fraction of the airmail cost.

Click here to go to our on-line shop.

Tips of the month


If this is true it’s very scary!

It is not true apparently!
Following our article of last month about microwaves we have had a lot of feedback.

The story is simply not true apparently.

Please go to this link to read the true story about this subject.

We are sorry if we have caused any drama, broken marriages, microwaves being dumped (you needed a new one anyway) etc.
The article was published in good faith.

 



Vinegar,

The subject of what vinegar to use for Biltong has risen its head again. In 2004 Craig Rudolph mailed us with the following.

It should answer most peoples questions about vinegar.

Craig writes ………..

I was reading through the question with regards “Brown Vinegar” and am happy to provide the following information:

I worked for many years for a very large Vinegar manufacturer in South Africa. So I can speak with some knowledge on the product and what people should know.

As some people might know, vinegar is made via a double fermentation process.

Firstly the raw material (grapes, malt, apples or molasses) is fermented and then distilled into a 95% alcohol. (Normal drinking alcohol quality)
This alcohol is then fermented for a second time with a small bacteria called “Aceto-bacter.” This little bacteria spends the whole of its life eating alcohol molecules, with the help of nutrients, and turning the alcohol into acetic acid or vinegar.

The colour that various vinegars have is purely to do with where they are stored or what is added after their production. So malt vinegars could be stored in barrels etc. Wine vinegars with a red tinge will have been coloured with red grape skins for a short period. For most commercial brown vinegars, off the supermarket shelves, it is purely a small amount of caramel that is added. Depending on how dark they want it, depends on how much they add of the caramel.

Strength of vinegar can also increase with age. Balsamic vinegars can be as old as 200 years – not unlike good red wines. So for the person that used cider vinegar, I would suggest using a normal supermarket shelf white vinegar, which might be a little more subtle than the cider vinegar, and then obtain a small amount of caramel for adding and make their own brown vinegar.

Hope this is of help to the folks around the Biltong globe.

Regards

Craig Rudolph
Australia

 



South African Meat Cutting Charts


Below you will find three meat cutting charts.

These are displayed with the compliments of SAMIC.
(The South African Meat Industry Company).
SAMIC has a very interesting web site as well as a weekly newsletter about anything to do with the
Meat Industry in South Africa.
Now, don’t think this is a totally boring web site (I thought so first) but it has some very interesting articles and statistics.


Beef Cutting Chart
Pork Cutting Chart
Lamb Cutting Chart




English Meat Cutting Charts

These charts you find here are very detailed also showing what you can do with the different cuts.

They come from EBLEX
(English Beef and Lamb Executive)

They have a fun web site at www.beefyandlamby.co.uk with loads of excellent recipes to boot!
A site really worth visiting!
For the cutting charts click on the links below

UK Beef Cuts
UK Lamb Cuts
* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *

South African Musical and other Events in Europe


For all upcoming shows by South Africa artists please click on the South African events web site link below.
There are a host of South African artists coming to Europe in the next couple of weeks.

Amongst those are;

  • Johnny Clegg (Luxembourg/France)
  • Riku Latti (Holland/Belgium)
  • Ha!Man (UK, Belgium and France)
  • Tidal Waves (Belgium – FREE ENTRANCE)
  • Soweto Gospel Choir (Various countries, see the web site)
  • Polisiekar (Holland/Belgium/England)
  • And many, many more

We went to see Anton Goosen in November and apart from an excellent show the organization was faultless. Good food, good music and a very enjoyable evening.

To see all upcoming events please click on South African Events in Europe web site. There are loads of things happening!

Questions and Answers


As every month, here is our regular section on the many questions we receive from our readers all over the world.
If we have not given an answer and you can help these people could you please mail them?
(Please copy us in on your mails @
info@biltongmakers.com
so we can help other people who might have the same questions in the future)


QUESTION

 

      We live in Tanzania and have a couple of questions. I hope that there is someone who can help me with some answers.
    • In Tanzania it is quite difficult to find a reliable supplier of pork. The sheep here look like goats, so sheeptails are also bit dicey. Therefore I am using brisket fat in the Boerewors as well as in droëwors.
      With the droe wors it seems fine and I have no problem. The Boerewors tends to be dry and brittle. Would it help if I add some oats to the mixture (I have seen few recipes calling for oats).
      Is there an alternative to oats? Is it better to have the meat minced fine, rather than a coarser mince (which I am doing at the moment)?
      I am using “Freddy Hirsch” spices. Do I use water as I am, at the moment not adding any water to my mixture?
    • Is there a recipe where I can also use local spices to make Garlic Boerewors.
    • In South Africa we used to buy Cheese Boerewors. When you cut it, you could actually see the cheese oozing out.
      Very nice.
      I would like to make something similar here. Do you have a recipe for me?
      Different cheeses here are expensive, but we do have a cheaper local mozzarella cheese and imported New Zealand cheddar cheese that is not so expensive.
  • I bought synthetic casings for Boerewors as well as droe wors.
    A friend gave me a small bag of casings coated with salt. This has been refrigerated for bit over a year now. It looks fine.
    How long can this keep in refrigerated conditions? I also received a kilogram bag of casings, but this has been frozen for about a year as well.
    My problem is that I do not know if I can defrost the casings, make it up in smaller packets and re-freeze it for later use. Can I perhaps coat some of it in salt again and keep small amounts in fridge to use as I need?

I really enjoy your newsletters, you are doing a GREAT JOB!

Hope you have solutions to my problems.
Kind regards,

Ina Hiller
Tanzania
inas@bol.co.tz

 



QUESTION

I am a big fan of biltong and as a member of a rugby supporters club, there is an ever increasing demand for my biltong.

I have purchased a mini/junior biltong dryer from an agent in Johannesburg. It’s the Butcherquip brand, which I think looks similar to the one you sell on your website.

My question to you is the following:
I have converted a stationery cupboard into a drying unit for my meat, and I would very much like to know if you could advise me on the size of fan that would be required, I guess it needs to be an industrial size fan, the dimensions of my drying box are as follows:

430mm x 910mm x 1740mm = 0.68 m³
Regards

Mike
Johannesburg, South Africa
mikelawrie@mweb.co.za

 



QUESTION

A lot of customers come up with the question if our spices are allowed in to Australia. We have had one instance years ago where an Australian customs official asked for a written list of the contents of the spices. After this was mailed through to them the spices were released without a problem.

The questions is:
Has anyone ever had any problems getting our spices in to Australia?
Please let us know so we can assure future customers.

Many thanks,
The Biltong Team
webmaster@biltongmakers.com

 



QUESTION

I ordered some of your Boerewors spice mix and have made my first batch but I’d appreciate some advice.
The wors tastes nice, nothing wrong with the spices, but it seems to me to be a bit tough.
I used stewing steak do you think that might be the cause or is it something in the technique.
It’s not unpleasantly tough but just not right if you know what I mean.

Cheers
Paul Bing
New Zealand
nzbings@xtra.co.nz

 



Feedback

 

We received some feedback regarding a question posed by Michael Rollins last month.

The question was:

Food safety is of great concern here, such that I doubt biltong could be legally sold, due to the center portion still being raw and pink.
This isn’t an issue with quality beef, which has passed government inspection.

However, I would like to make biltong out of wild venison, as hunting season for deer is currently open. The only bacteria or parasite that could possibly be present in the venison from my area is Lyme disease, which is bacterial.

The Afrikaner who introduced me to biltong years ago said they made it from fresh Kudu meat after a hunt, but didn’t mention whether there was any health risk associated with using wild game.
So, the question I ask you is whether properly prepared biltong is known to have any risks, or whether the preparation and drying/curing process kill bacteria in the pink interior of the meat?
If you can’t answer that, it’s okay. I’ll stick with beef.

The feedback:

I hunted in South Africa for more then 20 years, shot countless Kudu, Impala and Springbok, always cut and prepared my own biltong and never any health risks whatsoever.
We would cut up two Kudu’s and four Impala, make a couple of hundred pound (wet) biltong, dry it in our garage (with fan’s) until nearly bone dry and freeze in bundle’s and it would last us till the next hunting season. More then 20 years of eating venison biltong, never any health problems or risks.

Lyme disease is spread by deer ticks (has black legs and red body) that bites you. If you hunt and have a kill and a tick from the deer lands on you, just remove and take a single dose of doxycycline (need script from your doctor) to prevent lime disease.
Lyme disease cannot go from person to person, so cannot go from deer to person. Not contagious. So there shouldn’t be a concern in making venison biltong.

Invite me for a hunting trip (I will pay my way) and I will teach you how to make biltong properly.

Deon Pretorius

 

Stoep Talk

Hi ho, hi ho, it’s off to the coast we go……
By James ClarkePsychologist Dr Niki Swart, speaking some time back at a civil defence conference, said that in a disaster situation, 70 percent of people become confused and panicky, while 10 percent scream and cry, and the rest become distanced.

I have personal experience of this. It happens every time we go on holiday en famille – and this year we have, once again, decided that our tribe will migrate to the coast next month.

It is not that we want to avoid dishing out Christmas boxes to those 300 or so dustbin men who arrive in Impis shouting: “Happeeeeee!” and armed with authentic-looking letters from the municipality.

Although, to be honest, that is partly the reason.

It is also to avoid hearing: “Jingle bells, jingle bells” every time I go the shops.

But I have long realised how right Dr Swart was. My family, when setting out on a long journey, manifests the first two syndromes – confusion/panic and screaming/crying. I tend to be like the 20 percent and become distanced.

We usually go down to the sea in convoy, taking hours because there are so many females, and females have bladders the size of eyedrop bulbs which necessitates stopping every 20 minutes. And then the younger ones want crisps and soft drinks so that they can mash the chips into the back seat and set the cans, once almost emptied, rolling under the front seats going downhill and rolling back going uphill.

Nowadays we rendezvous at dawn at the house of either one of my daughters where we reverse over suitcases, burst plastic bags and find that women are bringing food supplies as if the South Coast is served only by a trading store that sells blankets and paraffin.

“How can you have bought all this stuff?”

“It just looks a lot. In any event, you should just see how much we left behind on the supermarket shelves.”

The scene is reminiscent of a dockside as an ocean liner prepares for the Far East.

“Who are all these people?” I cry. But really, I know, because I recognise many of their faces.

Meanwhile every burglar south of Harare can see he has two clear weeks to clean out the house. “I just hope,” said my son-in-law, “they’ll have time to clean out the garage too.”

On one occasion when my granddaughter was small, she spied a packed taxi pulling up and called to the people getting out: “You see this house? Well, Jesus is looking after it because we’re going on holiday.”

The drive is filled with people shouting helpful things like: “Aren’t you folks ready yet for Pete’s sake?”

“Oh no,” I say to my wife, “you are not bringing THREE suitcases?”

“I am.”

“Who said?”

“I did.”

“Oh well, that’s all right then.”

The scene changes to that of the Grand Staircase on the Titanic. I slide into the phase Niki Swart describes as “helplessly withdrawn”.

Inevitably, irrepressibly, the convoy moves out, forsaking the agreeable Highveld climate and heading southeast towards the rains and the sticky humidity that lies ahead.


More from the Chalk Front

I was on about howlers the other day and a reader (teacher) said teachers take a huge risk in asking pupils to write down what they think of teachers …..

“She looks very old,” wrote a child of her 25-year-old teacher.

Another wrote: “My teacher is at school to teach us how to spull.”

An admiring pupil said: “My teacher is clever. She is good at sharpening pencils.”

Another was even more satisfied: “I am clever because my teacharer teachars me.”

Recipes for Christmas


Classic Grilled Turkey
On the Weber Braai

Grill just one turkey this way and you will never go back to making it in the oven!

You need:

  • Oven-ready turkey – stuffed (we’ve done up to 6-7kg without any problem)
  • Oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • Herbs, spices or seasoning to taste

What to do:

  • Rinse turkey and pat dry. Turn wings back to hold neck skin in place. Return legs to tucked position. Brush turkey with oil. Season to taste, inside and out.
  • Using the indirect cooking method, place turkey, breast side up, in a roast holder. Place in center of cooking grate.
  • Cook to an internal temperature of 180º F in the thigh and 170ºF in the breast.
  • Remove turkey from grill and let stand 15 minutes before carving.

Gravy:
To collect the drippings for making gravy, pour a little water into foil pan and place under the bird (indirect cooking method)in between the coal separators. Replenish water as needed to keep drippings from burning. Remove pan from under turkey about 30 minutes before bird should be done and make gravy. (Continue cooking turkey in the center of the cooking grate).

Important note:
The big secret for a juicy Turkey ……
Halfway through the cooking process turn the bird! This will cause the juices to get through to the breast part.

 



Roast Rib of Beef with Caramelised Shallots
Serves 6
Preparation time:
25 minutes

Cooking time:
Rare: 20 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 20 minutes
Medium: 25 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 25 minutes
Well done: 30 minutes per 450g/1lb plus 30 minutes

Your shopping list:

  • 1 x 1.8kg/4lb lean rib of beef, French-trimmed and chinned, boneless rib, or topside joint
  • 15-30ml/1-2tbsp olive oil
  • Grated zest of 2 lemons or limes
  • 4 large sprigs fresh thyme leaves
  • Salt and freshly milled black pepper
  • 24 shallots, peeled and left whole
  • 300ml/½pint full bodied red wine, Port or sweet sherry
  • 150ml/¼pint good, hot beef stock, homemade if preferred
  • 15ml/1tbsp plain flour

Cheesy Yorkshire Puddings:

  • 175g (6oz) strong white plain flour
  • Pinch salt
  • 2 large eggs, beaten
  • 5ml (1tsp) fresh thyme leaves
  • 300-400ml (10-14floz) milk
  • 50g/2oz mature Cheddar cheese, or similar
  • 30ml (2tbsp) sunflower oil or beef dripping

How to do it:

 

    • Preheat the oven to Gas mark 4-5, 180-190°C, 350-375°F.
    • In a small bowl mix together the olive oil, lemon or lime zest and thyme leaves.
    • Place the joint on a chopping board, score the skin, pat dry with absorbent kitchen paper and season the joint. Sear the surface of the joint with the citrus mix.
    • Place the joint on a metal rack in a large roasting tin and open roast for the preferred calculated cooking time, basting occasionally with any rich beefy juices.
    • Prepare the Yorkshire puddings: In a large bowl sift the flour and salt together. Make a well in the center of the bowl and whisk in the eggs, thyme and enough milk to form a smooth, thick batter, about the consistency of double cream. Cover and leave the batter to rest in the refrigerator until required.

  • 1 hour before the end of the cooking time remove the joint from the oven and add the shallots to the tin with the red wine, Port or sherry. Position the joint on top of the shallots and return to the oven.
  • When the beef is cooked transfer to a platter, loosely cover with foil and keep warm. Retain the contents of the roasting tin for the gravy.
  • To cook the Yorkshire puddings: increase the oven temperature to Gas mark 7, 220°C, 425°F, and add the oil or beef dripping evenly in a 12-hole muffin or Yorkshire pudding tin and preheat in the oven for 5 minutes.
  • Just before using, re-whisk the batter, adding any extra milk to return to the consistency of double cream and pour into a jug. Remove the hot tin from the oven and pour the batter evenly into each hole, sprinkle over the grated cheese, return to the oven and cook for 20-25 minutes, or until golden brown and crisp.
  • Meanwhile, prepare the gravy, spoon off any excess oil from the tin, leaving about 30ml (2tbsp) of any rich, beefy juices. Place the roasting tin over a medium heat and sprinkle over the flour. Stir well with a small whisk or spoon, gradually the stock and stir again, scraping the base of the pan to release any sediment.
  • Add any meat juices from the platter, adjust the seasoning, if required and simmer for 8-10 minutes, stirring occasionally or until reduced to a well-flavoured gravy. Strain before serving.


Serve the beef with roast potatoes, the shallots, Yorkshire puddings and gravy.

 



Click below for our handy cooking converter
Our handy cooking converter
Stories from South Africa


Gansbaai Shark Whisperer goes International

Michael Rutzen is a 36-year-old Gansbaai local who has learnt to free-dive with adult great white sharks adjusting his body-language and using the currents and position of the sun to show that he is not a threat.

On a good day he can even hitch a ride on the dorsal fin of a massive great white. Michael hopes to build levels of trust between shark and man to the point where he believes he can hypnotize them into a hardly understood state known as tonic immobility, in which the shark becomes passive and seeks out human touch for apparent pleasure.

Michael is the focus of the latest project of two Cape Town film-maker brothers, Damon and Craig Foster.

Their upcoming film Sharkman, tells the story of Michael’s dream to change our perceptions of sharks.

People are afraid of sharks. They have been stereotyped by films and books as our worst enemy – who can forget Jaws – and presented as indiscriminate killers.

This belief endures because people hate being confused by the truth, however often it is repeated.

In 2005 the Global Shark Attack File recorded 69 attacks of which just five were fatal. In the Cape Peninsula there have only been 28 documented fatal shark attacks since 1960.

In comparison, thousands of people around the world die annually from lightning strikes and as many as three million people die from malaria.

Shark populations are being obliterated at a rate of 270 000 sharks each day across the world simply to keep up with consumer demand.

It is a rate of depletion that can no longer be sustained without fear of species collapse.

The stocks of some sharks have plummeted to just 10 percent of the population levels recorded in 1950.

It seems that until people’s perceptions of sharks change, this pattern will continue.

The Foster Brothers are film-makers who want to change perceptions of our natural environment. They believe that when we understand something, we will want to protect it.

Their highly successful 2001 film The Great Dance documents man and animal at their most extreme limits of endurance through the “chasing hunt”, a ritual never before revealed to the world outside the Kalahari Desert.

The Great Dance helped to change perceptions of the need to preserve San culture in the face of globalisation and tribal decline.

It received more awards than any other documentary of its time.

Commissioned by Animal Planet and Discovery Channel, Sharkman is the culmination of a lifetime of fascination with the ocean for the Foster siblings.

Growing up at Bakoven on the Atlantic seaboard, their bedroom window was below the high-water mark, and the bigger storms of the year would batter it until it seemed they would be washed away.

Damon Foster caught his first crayfish at the age of just four. And Damon and Craig have dived and fished throughout their lives.

The film is being made because they want to show that we need to protect one of the last truly wild predators. Damon finds it amazing that people know more about dinosaurs, which, of course, no one has ever seen, than about sharks.

Incredible scenes from the film show Michael learning how to “hypnotize” Caribbean reef sharks and black tips in the Bahamas and Caribbean, and tiger sharks off KwaZulu-Natal.

By stroking the mouth area of the shark as it rests in his lap, it becomes docile and almost affectionate.

Michael is amazed that these “killer” sharks are willing partners in this process, and even manages to enter a “liquid embrace” with a 3m-long tiger shark, descending over 15 meter before the shark “awakes” and then swims away.

Sharkman will be completed in December and will be broadcast to a viewing audience of about 200 million people on the Animal Planet and Discovery channels.

Around the World


Bits and Bobs from people around the world

 

There is not much this month. Perhaps you are busy getting ready for Christmas or the holidays? Come on guys. Let’s see what you can do for next month’s issue? -Ed.

 



I am not sure how I landed up on your newsletter list but I am thankful I did, I thoroughly enjoy reading your updates. My name is Tracy-lee Kropman, I am originally from Cape Town and have lived in Charlotte, North Carolina for nearly 6 years now and totally love it. We are very fortunate to have an awesome biltong company here that makes biltong as good if not better than any biltong I have ever tasted in South Africa but still I think what you are doing with the biltong machine and all, is so cool for people that are not as fortunate as us to have someone like you to take care of their needs 🙂

Anyway the reason for my email is that I have just started a South African email loop which is getting going very slowly but we are getting there. There is a good following of South Africans here in North Carolina, mostly in Raleigh but here in Charlotte we are getting going with events etc. to get us all together every now and again.

Anyway I am getting off the subject … what I wanted to say was that although I started doing the loop for South Africans living in Charlotte, it has spread to other South Africans living in the States and even some outside of the States.

Most information is relevant to people living in the USA but often it is just a chat or sharing recipe information or whatever, so I thought I would send you the link and if you are interested in joining, please feel free.

The link is:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/satarheelscharlotte/

Take care.
Tracy-lee Kropman
Charlotte, North carolina, USA

 



Hi all,

Exciting information for all readers. Original game and Ostrich Biltong from South Africa is now allowed in to the European Union countries!

Kind regards
Hilmar Hambloch
Germany

 



Hallo,

Neem eens een kijkje op volgend adres:
http://www.rvi.be/rvi_master/reisboeken/rvi_reisboek_zuidafrika/index.shtml
Groetjes
Chris Vervliet
Belgie

 



Affinity Publishing in South Africa has recently published a book entitled Jo’burg! The Passion Behind a City.

The book recognises the people behind Jo’burg’s rejuvenation. It shares success stories, documents the progress that’s been made to date, and ultimately aims to change perceptions about a city that so often only hits the headlines when talking about crime and grime.

Jo’burg! The Passion Behind a City is ideally suited to convey a message of optimism and pride regarding Jo’burg, its people and its future.

I have attached a picture of the book as well as a brief synopsis and will be most grateful if you would consider mentioning the book in your newsletter with a link to our website.

Many thanks and best regards
Samantha van Staden
Associate Publisher
Affinity Publishing
South Africa

(We will tell you more about this exciting new book once we have had a look at it. Perhaps next month? -Ed)

 

Something to smile about


Cape Town

-from Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia-
Cape Town is a city on the coast of South Africa so called because the wearing of capes or cloaks is compulsory within the city limits. It was founded by Batman on his way to Melbourne from Holland in 1652.

Cape Town is also called “The Mother City”, believed to be due to the highly expressive vocabulary of the local dialect (in which the words “your mother” feature regularly) and the cheap and nasty (but potent) local wine. A different school of thought believes the origin of the name lies in the fact that it takes 9 months to do anything in this sleepy hollow.

Cape Town is situated on a sandbar under Table Mountain (so called because unlike most mountains, it is flat). Cape Town became famous for the first successful heart transplant operation at its “Great Skewer” Hospital by Christian Barnyard.

Cape Town is neither as wealthy nor as large as Johannesburg, so the inhabitants compensate with a superior attitude based on the claim that they were there first. Which none of them personally were, unless they are over 300 years old.

It is socially unacceptable for a Capetonian to talk to people that they have not previously talked to, which severely limits social interactions.
If the opportunity should somehow present itself, a traditional Cape Town greeting is “Jou ma se *%#@”, often abbreviated to “Jou ma”, which means, roughly “Good day and good health to you and your good mother, sir!”

Robin Island was named after Batman’s faithful sidekick. Later it was renamed “Robbin’ Island” and used as a jail, like Alcatraz but with colder water around it and more sharks in it.

In spite of the revolution in 1994 severe social inequality still persists. Efforts to redress this historical imbalance are progressing well, particularly the “mugg’em” initiative.

Popular sports are pretentiousness, drunk-driving, pole-vaulting, homosexuality, French dressing and Mexican standoffs. The summer sport of setting fire to the mountainside is more popular with tourists than with locals, though all enjoy the cheerful spectacle of the flames and smoke.

Since 2006, the town council of Cape Town has embraced an “Amishisation ” policy, and has turned it’s back on the use of electricity, declaring it a decadent bourgeois luxury. Electricity is slowly being phased out in a series of “power cuts”, and it is to be replaced by the use of candles, paraffin lamps and fires for illumination and sing-alongs for entertainment.

Cape Town is the first place to boast an Invisible Bridge. However, the bridge is currently not in use as the city council refused to believe the claims of the construction company when they informed the council that they had developed a new building material which was stronger than steel but could not be seen by the human eye. The city council is said to have likened the bridge fiasco to “The Emperor’s New Clothes”.

Roads Memorial celebrates the fact that Cape Town is where roads were invented. This is delightfully done by means of a monument which includes important tools to road- making such as lions, a man with a horse and some dude’s head.

Bergies are Cape Town’s world famous mountaineers who live on Table Mountain and often come down into the city to welcome foreigners with the traditional Capetonian greeting of “Jou maaaa se *%$@!”

 



At a good-bye luncheon for an old and dear co-worker who was leaving the company due to “down-sizing,” our manager commented cheerfully, “This is fun. We should do this more often.”

Not a word was spoken.

Sport talk


Snippets from the papers

Currie Cup system entrenched until 2011
SA Rugby’s President’s Council got it right on Wednesday: the strength-versus-strength
Currie Cup format has been retained for at least the next five seasons.
Full Story ….

White gets backing of President’s Council
Springbok coach Jake White says he is happy that he can “relax a bit and get on with the job” after he received a vote of confidence from the SA Rugby President’s Council.
Full Story ….

Young hooker to rewrite history books
Chiliboy Ralepelle will become the first black player to captain a Springbok XV when he leads them out against a World XV in Leicester.
Full Story ….

Ganguly recalled for Test series against SA
India’s selectors have recalled former captain Sourav Ganguly for December’s three-Test series against the Proteas.
Full Story…

Proteas are going for the kill
Proteas skipper Graeme Smith has promised that his side will not take the foot off the pedal despite being 2-0 up in the one-day series against India.
Full Story ….



-Where can you watch rugby on TV?-
Click here to find out where in most countries!
Let’s hear from you too!!


Let’s make the next issue a Bumper one!

It is the last month of the year so why not join us and make the first issue of 2007 a real bumper one! Let’s all put pen to paper or the fingers to the keyboard and let rip!

It does not have to be about Biltong or such. We’d love to hear where you live and how you have adapted yourself to your new life style and surroundings.

You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask?
Perhaps you have some advice to give?

You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Share it with other people around the world!

Boerewors in Europe


Boerewors (Europe only, sorry people!)

A lot of people took our advice and stocked up with Boerewors in November. So much so that we had to make an extra 170kg batch! We even send 5 kg to Susan Rowett in Monaco!
We have fresh stock available most of the time.
Boeries on the braai!
So if you need Boerewors just email us or call. You can either collect or we can mail it to you.
All our customers in Holland, Belgium and in fact, all over Europe are raving about the packing of and the condition in which the wors arrived at their doorsteps.

Just imagine some “lekker” pap and wors with a nice tomato and onion sauce!

Just give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.

Our Boerewors is vacuum packed in quantities of about 500 gram.
The normal price is € 8.45 per kg but for the time being we will keep it at only € 7.95 per kg!!

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Droëwors for the UK and Europe!


Droëwors …… a typical South African delicacy all of its own!

Droëwors, as it is known in South Africa, is as much part of the country’s culinary culture as Biltong, Pap, Boerewors and Potjiekos.
Real South African Droë Wors!The spices are of course imported especially from South Africa so you will get the “real” thing!
Unfortunately we are all sold out right now. The droëwors was sold within a week of the announcement of the special pricing! But ….. please place your advance orders for the next batches to make sure you don’t lose out!!

The price will be € 28.00 per kg or € 7.00 per 250 gram packet.

Droëwors travels well and posting is an ideal option.
We can mail it to you in Europe and the UK via priority mail in minimum quantities of 1 kg.
See all the mailing rates by going to www.boerewors.be

Interested? Give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25 or email.

Lamb on the Spit


Lamb on the Spit ……. something special!

The Braai season is over in Europe (except for some diehards!) but the Spring and Summer of 2007 are not too far away!!

Lamb on the Spit is a way of entertaining as only known by very few mainly because it is thought to be very expensive ……. Not so!

Click to see me big!We will do a lamb on the Spit for parties of between 30 and 50 people for just € 18.00 and € 15.00 a head respectively.

Together with the lamb we will treat you to a big pot of curried potatoes as well as a choice between a pasta salad or three-bean salad. Garlic or bread rolls are included as well.
For venues more than 50 km from our home base in Keerbergen there is a small transport fee.
The barbecue season is almost over but there is always next year.
Start planning now for the Spring and next Summer!
Remember that we are doing these functions only during weekends.

 

Booking early is essential and you can do so on
+32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.

(A Lamb on the Spit can only be done outside because we cook on coals!)


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Previous issues of our Newsletter


You can click on the links below to view some of the previous issues of our newsletter.

 

 

December 2005
January 2006
February 2006
March 2006
April 2006
May 2006
June 2006
July 2006
August 2006
September 2006
October 2006
November 2006


Subscribing and Unsubscribing

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November 2006

 

The home of Biltong, Boerewors, Potjiekos and much, much more!


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The Biltongmakers.Com Newsletter
November 2006
You are receiving this newsletter because you have previously placed an order with Biltongmakers or made an enquiry about Biltong, Boerewors or Potjie Pots or someone has submitted your name to us thinking that you might be interested.
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In this Newsletter

From the editor

DISCLAIMER

The information and contributions contained in this newsletter are received from various readers local and international. Views and opinions reflected in our newsletter are not necessarily those of Biltongmakers.Com and its team members.


Keerbergen
Belgium
November 10, 2006

Hello everyone!

It is still pitch dark outside as I sit here putting the final touches on the newsletter for this month.

just click to see me bigIt is just after 6 o’clock in the morning and June left for work in Brussels a little while ago.

Outside it has been raining all night and it seems that we had a lot of wind as well. All the hard work I did last week clearing the autumn leaves was undone last night. I guess I have to get in there with the leaf blower again this coming weekend.

But, we like it!

Autumn is here at last with its kaleidoscope of colours. Some of the sights are quite unbelievable and breath taking. No picture could ever do justice to the incredible beauty of especially the forests but also of normal shrubs and trees along the roads and in the gardens.
The central heating has been on for a while now so it is nice and warm inside. Let it blow out there we say. It’s lovely to look from the inside out!

And so November is here and with it the start of our winter. We haven’t had much of that yet this year. The temperatures have been very mild.

But, it won’t last, that I can assure you!

Both June and I are looking forward to the winter. We like the snow and the cold weather as most of our regular readers will know by now.

For the southern part of our world summer is on its way. From what we hear from around those parts of the world it has been pretty warm already! Good luck to all of you there. You deserve it after the past winter!

Looking at the weather on the BBC this morning I saw that it is not looking to good for the UK next week. We are going to the UK on a combined business/pleasure trip and decided to take the Ferry from Calais again. Nice and relaxing and the food is good too! Let’s just hope the Channel will not be too choppy!

Well, I am not going to keep you long. There are a lot of contributions this month so let’s get going!

Just one last thing; why don’t we make it a bumper issue next month with even more contributions from everybody?
It does not take much to put pen to paper (or the fingers to the keyboard). Anything will do. I am sure that everyone will enjoy it.

All the best and take care.

Till next month,

Lo



Here are the answers to our quiz of last month. Our apologies to those who looked in vain from the 15th of September onwards. Age people, age ……

World’s easiest quiz

Remember, you need 4 correct answers to pass.

  • How long did the Hundred Years War last? 116 years
  • Which country makes Panama hats? Ecuador
  • From which animal do we get cat gut? Sheep and Horses
  • In which month do Russians celebrate the October Revolution? November
  • What is a camel’s hair brush made of? Squirrel fur
  • The Canary Islands in the Pacific are named after what animal? Dogs
  • What was King George VI’s first name? Albert
  • What color is a purple finch? Crimson
  • Where are Chinese gooseberries from? New Zealand
  • What is the color of the black box in a commercial airplane? Orange [of
  • course]

What do you mean, you failed? Me, too.

(And if you try to tell me you passed, you lie!)

Pass this on to some brilliant friends, so they can feel useless too.



“Success is not the key to happiness. Happiness is the key to success. If you love what you are doing, you will be successful.”
– Albert Schweitzer –


“You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation.”
– Plato –

Food for thought

Family


I ran into a stranger as he passed by,
“Oh excuse me please” was my reply.

He said, “Please excuse me too;
I wasn’t watching for you.”

We were very polite, this stranger and I.
We went on our way and we said goodbye.

But at home a different story is told,
How we treat our loved ones, young and old.

Later that day, cooking the evening meal,
My son stood beside me very still.

When I turned, I nearly knocked him down.
“Move out of the way,” I said with a frown.

He walked away, his little heart broken.
I didn’t realize how harshly I’d spoken.

While I lay awake in bed,
God’s still small voice came to me and said,

“While dealing with a stranger,
common courtesy you use,
but the family you love, you seem to abuse.

Go and look on the kitchen floor,
You’ll find some flowers there by the door.

Those are the flowers he brought for you.
He picked them himself: pink, yellow and blue.

He stood very quietly not to spoil the surprise,
you never saw the tears that filled his little eyes.”

By this time, I felt very small,
And now my tears began to fall.

I quietly went and knelt by his bed;
“Wake up, little one, wake up,” I said.

“Are these the flowers you picked for me?”
He smiled, “I found ’em, out by the tree.

I picked ’em because they’re pretty like you.
I knew you’d like ’em, especially the blue.”

I said, “Son, I’m very sorry for the way I acted today;
I shouldn’t have yelled at you that way.”
He said, “Oh, Mom, that’s okay.
I love you anyway.”

I said, “Son, I love you too,
and I do like the flowers, especially the blue.”

FAMILY
Are you aware that if we died tomorrow, the company
that we are working for could easily replace us in
a matter of days.
But the family we left behind will feel the loss
for the rest of their lives.

And come to think of it, we pour ourselves more
into work than into our own family,
an unwise investment indeed,
don’t you think?
So what is behind the story?

Do you know what the word FAMILY means?
FAMILY = (F)ATHER (A)ND (M)OTHER (I) (L)OVE (Y)OU

Story of the month


Eat drink and be merry!


Remember all the stories about Good Food and the nasty types that make you fat, the amount of red wine you drink and the kaygee (kg) lekker sagte biltong?
Well read this, kick the diets under the butt and have a 2kg lekker nat en vet biltong and celebrate!
Here is the reason why diets don’t work!

Diets

For those of you who watch what you eat, here’s the final word on nutrition and health. It’s a relief to know the truth after all those conflicting medical studies.

    • The Japanese eat very little fat and suffer fewer heart attacks than the Americans, Australians, British, or Canadians.

  • The Mexicans eat a lot of fat and also suffer fewer heart attacks than the Americans, Australians, British, or Canadians.
  • The Japanese drink very little red wine and suffer fewer heart attacks than the Americans, Australians, British, or Canadians.
  • The Italians drink large amounts of red wine and also suffer fewer
  • heart attacks than the Americans, Australians, British, or Canadians.

  • The Germans drink a lot of beer and eat lots of sausages and fats and suffer fewer heart attacks than the Americans, Australians, British, or Canadians.
  • Ukrainians drink a lot of vodka, eat a lot of perogies, cabbage rolls and suffer fewer heart attacks than the Americans, Australians, British, or Canadians.

Conclusion:
Eat and drink what you like!



But now let’s get serious….

Why diets don’t work
By Deanne Jade, Principal of the National Center of Eating Disorders

A visitor from a far-off planet observing the way we behave could easily assume that dieting is a very good idea indeed.
We do it all the time.

In fact, dieting is so popular that in the past 10 years it’s estimated that around 70 per cent of the adult female population and 30 per cent of of all adult males (in developed countries) have been on one.
It doesn’t seem to matter whether it’s the F-Plan diet, the Pineapple diet, liquid diets or the Drinking Man’s diet, people will try almost anything in their frantic desire to shed a few pounds. Unfortunately, the results are usually the same.

Although diets do produce results in the short term, very few dieters maintain their weight loss, no matter which diet they try. Even worse than this, most dieters end up bigger than they were before they started dieting.

So, why don’t diets work?

Diets are hard to do
Most diets involve a significant change in a person’s normal eating habits over an extended period of time.
But habits die hard; we cling to them because they fit in with our lifestyle and the people around us. And changing something that is second nature to us very often results in stress – especially if that change is at odds with the habits of those in our social and family world.

Dieting is also hard because it relies on our willpower to keep us on the right track. Willpower is often very strong at the start of a diet when we are desperate to change, but it can ebb and flow with the state of our health and the pressures and triggers of day-to-day life.

Dieters rarely think of rehearsing how they will manage in difficult situations such as going out to dinner with friends; they just hope that their willpower will hold up and they punish themselves if it doesn’t.

Willpower is hard to maintain for extended periods of time, especially if our dietary rules are too strict. Sometimes we feel like we’ve made some progress in our diet and so we become less inclined to put ourselves through the struggle of restricting our food. So dieting is hard because people haven’t learned the difference between willpower and commitment to long-term behaviour change.

Diets make you feel hungry and deprived
Research shows that, whether you are fat or thin, diets make you very hungry and create powerful cravings for the very foods that dieters try to stay away from – such as sugars and fats.
On top of these cravings, dieters also have to manage feelings of deprivation: ‘Everybody is eating what I’m not allowed to. They can have it – why cant I?’ This kind of thinking is likely to lead to rebellious overeating.

Dieters lapse and collapse
A diet only works for as long as you are on it.
Most people get bored with rigid eating plans and go off the rails from time to time. The trouble is that for many people a lapse is a sign of failure. They tell themselves they’ve ‘blown it’ and experience feelings of inadequacy; the lapse becomes a slippery slope and they end up eating anything that’s not nailed to the floorboards in the hope that they will ‘start again tomorrow’.

Such people go from diet to diet hoping to find the one that will stop them from failing, but such a diet doesn’t exist, and they may end up bigger than ever each time they try.

Diets fail to address the emotional aspect of overeating
People very often eat to help deal with emotional problems such as stress, rather than because they’re hungry. This is normal, but some people gain weight because they turn to food for emotional comfort or to cope with negative feelings like anger or loss. Dieting doesn’t solve the problem of ’emotional’ eating. If anything, it makes people more depressed – and losing weight will often make things worse, as people have to cope with the pressures and expectations that their new body shape can entail.

Dieters usually fail to change their core habits
The only people who lose weight and keep it off permanently are those who have made permanent changes to their own eating and exercise habits, and to those of their families.

Dieters too often say or think things like: ‘When I’m slim I’ll never overeat again’ or ‘When I’ve lost this weight I’ll go out and celebrate with a cream cake’, or ‘Why should I change the family eating habits just because I’m on a diet?’
Too often those old eating habits will creep back in, no matter how much weight the dieter has lost, and in time they’ll find themselves back at square one.

Conclusion
Wanting to be a healthy weight and to manage one’s eating in a world full of temptations is a laudable aim. However, dieting as we know it is not the way to do it.

For long-term weight loss, many things – not just your nutritional habits – will have to change.

South African Meat Industry Company

Samic has excellent meat cutting charts. Just click on the banner below for lots of interesting information.


Our Home Biltong Makers (What people say)


I love having Biltong “on tap”!
Lee Ann Cantrell, Cresta, Johannesburg

Hi Biltongmakers!

I think I may have another couple of orders for you. The Germans I work with were so impressed with my homemade biltong, they want to do it themselves!

Gunter Pibernik
England



Thank you very much, my order has arrived!
The first time I purchased a a Biltong Maker was for my son who always enjoyed making biltong with his late father and he has not stopped using it!
My son-in-law was so impressed that I decided it would make a super birthday gift which is the 1st November so it arrived in time!

Thank you again
Jenny Winter
Cape Town, South Africa



Hi Guys,

My first batch turned out great, absolutely love having biltong “on tap”! Now I can experiment to my hearts content!

Lee Ann Cantrell
Cresta, Johannesburg

The most popular Home Biltong Maker in the world!You too could be making your own Biltong in a very short space of time.
Have a look at our Home Biltong Makers and see how easy it is!!

Details on ROCKEY’S 5kg Home Biltong Maker can be found by clicking on this link.

It's as easy as 1-2-3 to make your own Biltong!

You can have a look at the BILTONG BUDDY here.

This month’s specials
Christmas is only a couple of shopping weeks away! …..

In two months time we’ll be halfway through January 2007!

There is still time to have your Biltong Maker delivered before Christmas but only if you place your order now!!

As an extra bonus to end this year off on a high note, the following prices will apply:

Rockey’s incredible 5kg Home Biltong Maker @ only R 850.00! (Normal retail is R 950.00).
The unbeatable Biltong Buddy (2kg) @ only R 695.00! (Normal retail is R 750.00).

Make use of this opportunity and ask for surface mail! It costs a fraction of the airmail cost.

Surprise your family and friends with a piece of real South African Biltong this Christmas. It’s as easy as 1-2-3 and loads of fun too!

Click here to go to our on-line shop.

Tips of the month


If this is true it’s very scary!

Microwaved Water – See what it does to plants!
Recently a science student undertook a science fair project. click on the picture to see it biggerIn it she took filtered water and divided it into two parts. The first part she heated to boiling in a pan on the stove, and the second part she heated to boiling in a microwave.

Then after cooling she used the water to water two identical plants to see if there would be any difference in the growth between the normal boiled water and the water boiled in a microwave.

She was thinking that the structure or energy of the water may be compromised by microwave. As it turned out, even she was amazed at the difference.

Click on the picture to see it biggerI have known for years that the problem with microwaved anything is not the radiation people used to worry about. It’s how it corrupts the DNA in the food so the body can not recognize it.

So the body wraps it in fat cells to protect itself from the dead food or it eliminates it fast. Think of all the Mothers heating up milk in these “Safe” appliances. What about the nurse in Canada that warmed up blood for a transfusion patient and accidentally killed them when the blood went in dead!

But the makers say it’s safe. Never mind then, keep using them. Ask your Doctor I am sure they will say it’s safe too.

Proof is in the pictures of living plants dying.

Remember You are also Living! Take Care.



Forensic Research Document
Prepared By: William P. Kopp
A. R. E. C. Research Operations
TO61-7R10/10-77F05
RELEASE PRIORITY: CLASS I ROO1a

Ten Reasons to throw out your Microwave Oven

From the conclusions of the Swiss, Russian and German scientific clinical studies, we can no longer ignore the microwave oven sitting in our kitchens. Based on this research, we will conclude this article with the following:

  1. Continually eating food processed from a microwave oven causes long term -permanent- brain damage by “shorting out” electrical impulses in the brain [de-polarizing or de-magnetizing the brain tissue].
  2. The human body cannot metabolize [break down] the unknown by-products created in microwaved food.
  3. Male and female hormone production is shut down and/or altered by continually eating microwaved foods.
  4. The effects of microwaved food by-products are residual [long term, permanent] within the human body.
  5. Minerals, vitamins, and nutrients of all microwaved food is reduced or altered so that the human body gets little or no benefit, or the human body absorbs altered compounds that cannot be broken down.
  6. The minerals in vegetables are altered into cancerous free radicals when cooked in microwave ovens.
  7. Microwaved foods cause stomach and intestinal cancerous growths [tumors]. This may explain the rapidly increased rate of colon cancer in America.
  8. The prolonged eating of microwaved foods causes cancerous cells to increase in human blood.
  9. Continual ingestion of microwaved food causes immune system deficiencies through lymph gland and blood serum alterations.
  10. Eating microwaved food causes loss of memory, concentration, emotional instability, and a decrease of intelligence.

Have you tossed out your microwave oven yet?

After you throw out your microwave you can use a toaster oven as a replacement. It works well for most and is nearly as quick.

The use of artificial microwave transmissions for subliminal psychological control, a.k.a. “brainwashing”, has also been proven.
We’re attempting to obtain copies of the 1970’s Russian research documents and results written by Drs. Luria and Perov specifying their clinical experiments in this area.



Meat Cutting Charts


Below you will find three meat cutting charts.

These are displayed with the compliments of SAMIC.
(The South African Meat Industry Company).
SAMIC has a very interesting web site as well as a weekly newsletter about anything to do with the
Meat Industry in South Africa.
Now, don’t think this is a totally boring web site (I thought so first) but it has some very interesting articles and statistics.


Beef Cutting Chart
Pork Cutting Chart
Lamb Cutting Chart
* * * * Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement – Advertisement * * * *

South African Musical and other Events in Europe


For all upcoming shows by South Africa artists please click on the South African events web site link below.
There are a host of South African artists coming to Europe in the next couple of weeks.

Amongst those are;

  • Springbok Nude Girls (London)
  • Klopjag (London)
  • Beeskraal (London)(Boere punk)
  • Riki Latti (Holland/Belgium)
  • Soweto Gospel Choir (Various countries, see the web site)
  • Casper de Vries (Holland)
  • And many, many more
We went to see Anton Goosen in November and apart from an excellent show the organization was faultless. Good food, good music and a very enjoyable evening.

To see all upcoming events please click on South African Events in Europe web site. There are loads of things happening!

Questions and Answers


As every month, here is our regular section on the many questions we receive from our readers all over the world.
If we have not given an answer and you can help these people could you please mail them?
(Please copy us in on your mails @
info@biltongmakers.com
so we can help other people who might have the same questions in the future)


QUESTION

I have bought a Biltong Maker for my butchery and need to know at what temperature the meat dries? Is this something you would know or have you any suggestion of how I would find this out?

Rory
South Africa
smokejumper@mighty.co.za



QUESTION

I’m American, but please don’t hold that against me. Politics aside, I have some questions about biltong preparation that I can’t get properly answered here.

Food safety is of great concern here, such that I doubt biltong could be legally sold, due to the center portion still being raw and pink.
This isn’t an issue with quality beef, which has passed government inspection.

However, I would like to make biltong out of wild venison, as hunting season for deer is currently open. The only bacteria or parasite that could possibly be present in the venison from my area is Lyme disease, which is bacterial.

The Afrikaner who introduced me to biltong years ago said they made it from fresh Kudu meat after a hunt, but didn’t mention whether there was any health risk associated with using wild game.
So, the question I ask you is whether properly prepared biltong is known to have any risks, or whether the preparation and drying/curing process kill bacteria in the pink interior of the meat?
If you can’t answer that, it’s okay. I’ll stick with beef.

Lastly, a few questions on ingredients. Your recipes call for “rock salt” or “coarse salt”. What is generally available in the U.S. is Kosher salt, although I believe I might find something closer to what you call coarse salt at a specialty shop.

What we call “rock salt” is used only for the making of home-made ice cream. This stuff is generally considered unfit for human consumption, as it is rough-mined and can contain dirt and other impurities. (It’s other use is for de-icing walkways in freezing weather.)
Is Kosher usable? Or, do you think I should head to a specialty shop to find the right stuff?

Lastly, can you help define “brown vinegar”? Sounds like the malt vinegar we use on fish and chips, which is brown. If it has another name, could you clue me in? We have a couple of large, specialty grocers in my area, and I bet I can find it, or something suitable.

I do hope I am not overly complicating what you folks consider a fairly simple recipe. In any case, I’ll be ordering your biltong cutter shortly.

Thank you most sincerely,
Michael Rollins
3029 Pine Hill Drive
Kennesaw GA, 30144
United States of America
rollinsm@bellsouth.net



QUESTION

Ek is op soek na Boerewors en Biltong resepte op CD vir my kinders in Engeland.
Help asseblief.
Dirk Bezuidenhout
South Africa
ddbezuidenhout@telkomsa.net

Stoep Talk

All that trouble about a forgotten lipstick …..
By James Clarke

Having, not long ago, been rear-ended by a young woman motorist (whose crisp turn of phrase revealed her to be no lady) I became a bit nervous when, a few mornings ago, I found a Yofex (young female executive) driving a hair’s breadth from my rear bumper and chatting away on her cellphone.

The sub-cult of the Johannesburg Yofex is instantly recognizable. Its members drive white BMW 3 Series; nearly always have a cigarette between their fingers and a phone tucked under their ear so that they have to drive with their heads sharply inclined to one side. Not that I am one to generalize, you understand.

Even minibus taxi drivers pull over when they see a Yofex approaching.

Yofexes, white or black, have pale skins because they are never outdoors. They spend their weekends rearranging their Filofaxes, working on flow charts for their next presentation, cooking three-course meals for their Maltese terriers and working off calories at the local gym in incredibly expensive leotards.

If a Yofex dents her car or finds she has a grey hair she is likely to seek her bed and go into a foetal position from which only the jaws of life can unfold her. Not much else fazes her.

I was driving along the M1 North, relaxed, feet up on the dashboard and noting how green the trees were when, as I say, this white BMW became glued to my rear.

I slowed down, giving her the opportunity to pull out and overtake and ferret her way into the tangle of traffic ahead. Everybody gave way but I doubt she noticed. Anyway the Yofex code is: “Death, before acknowledging a courtesy.”

I eventually found myself behind her and, to signal that she was taking the next off-ramp, she turned on her windscreen wipers.

I was taking the same off-ramp and at the top we both turned right but then, to my surprise, she turned right again – back on to the highway but this time in the opposite direction from whence she had come.

I noticed she was still on the phone. She might even have been doing her nails. I could be mistaken. She might just as well have been making notes.

Obviously she had forgotten something – her flow charts perhaps; notes for her presentation; maybe her lipstick…

I imagined her jinking her way through Rosebank and back into Parktown North where many Yofexes live in singularly anonymous quarters behind blank white walls.

I could imagine the sound of her reverse thrust as she came to a stop outside her house. Her hysterical ankle-biting Maltese would be flinging itself against the grill gate where also stood her man.

Yofexes rarely have husbands. Even if they do they still refer to him as their man. Their men generally have a more leisurely approach to their jobs, hence they leave home later.

She would have phoned ahead and her man would have been standing there holding out the forgotten item. Then her tyres would have smoked as she threw her car forward having grabbed something from her man’s outstretched hand – yes, the forgotten lipstick, I bet.


Talking of Maltese… a reader, Ian Sabook sent me some frankly worded ads from the Pets’ Corner in the classified section:

Found: Maltese terrier: Eight years old. Hateful little bitch. Bites.

Found: Dirty white dog. Looks like a rat… Been out a while. Better be a reward.

Free puppies: 1/2 cocker spaniel – 1/2 sneaky neighbour’s dog.

Free German shepherd: 85lbs. Neutered. Speaks German

Recipe corner


Kerskoek and Cape Brandy Pudding

Met die seisoen wat weer amper op ons is, moet ons begin dink daaraan om the bak!
Hier is die maklikste resep ooit!

Kerskoek

Bestanddele:

  • 1 koppie water
  • 1 teelepel koeksoda
  • 1 koppie suiker
  • 1 teelepel sout
  • 1 koppie bruinsuiker
  • Suurlemoensap
  • 4 groot eiers
  • Neute
  • 1 bottel vodka
  • 2 koppies droëvrugte

Metode:

Proe die vodka om gehalte te toets.

  • Neem ‘n groot mengbak en proe weer die vodka. Maak seker dis die beste gehalte, skink een koppie vol en drink dit.
  • Herhaal.
  • Skakel die menger aan.
  • Klits een koppie botter in ‘n donsige bak.
  • Voeg ‘n teelepel suiker by.
  • Klits weer.
  • Maak seker die vodka is sjteeds goed.
  • Drink nog ‘n koppie … vir die wis en die onwis. Skakel die menger af.
  • Breek twee uiers, gooi dit en die droëvrugte by.
  • Tel die vrugte van die vloer af op.
  • Meng die skakelaar aan. As die droëvrugte in die menger vassjit,
  • sjkroewedraaier dit losj.
  • Proe die vodka vir gifterigheid.
  • Sif nou twee koppies sout. Of so iets. Wie gee om??
  • Proe die vodka.
  • Sif die suurlemoensap, dreineer die neute en gooi ‘n tafel by.
  • Dan ‘n lepel sjuiker, of sjo ietsj. Wat jy ook al kan kry.
  • Sjmeer die oond.
  • Draai die koekpan 360° en moenie val nie.
  • Menger die afskakel.
  • Gooie die bak deurrie venster enne drunkie laasjte vodka op.

Gekersde Seënfees!!!

Luandré Volschenk



Cape brandy pudding

The Cake

Ingredients

  • 250 g dates, stoned and finely chopped
  • 5 ml bicarbonate of soda
  • 250 ml boiling water
  • 125 g margarine
  • 200 g sugar
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 240 g cake flour
  • 5 ml baking powder
  • 2 ml salt
  • 250 ml walnuts or pecan nuts, chopped

Method

  • Preheat oven to 180 ºC
  • Divide chopped dates into 2 portions
  • Add bicarbonate of soda and boiling water to 1 portion, mix well and leave to cool
  • Cream margarine and sugar then beat in eggs
  • Sift flour, baking powder and salt over mixture and fold in
  • Add dry portions of dates and walnuts, blending well
  • Stir in bicarbonate of soda mixture, blend thoroughly and turn batter out into a large baking dish
  • Bake for 40 minutes or until firm.

The Syrup/Sauce

Ingredients

  • 300 ml sugar
  • 15 ml butter
  • 200 ml water
  • 5 ml vanilla essence
  • 2 ml salt
  • 25 ml brandy

Method

  • Heat sugar, butter and water for 5 minutes
  • Remove from stove and stir in vanilla essence, salt and brandy
  • Pour sauce over pudding as soon as it comes out of the oven

Serve hot or cold with whipped cream.


Click below for our handy cooking converter
Our handy cooking converter
Stories from South Africa


‘Air safety systems will be ready by 2010’

Transport Minister Jeff Radebe says South Africa is well on its way to meeting airport and air safety requirements in order to deal with the flood of tourists expected to hit the country during the 2010 soccer World Cup and beyond.

Speaking at the Airports Council International World Annual Assembly being held in Cape Town, Radebe stressed that the country was not sitting idle.

“South Africa, through Airports Company SA, is already making huge investments on airport developments to address the high growth rate in air transportation and the added demands of accelerating infrastructure development plans to cater to the forecast traffic peak presented by the Fifa World Cup in 2010,” he said.

‘Safety and security is high on our agenda’  “We have already started with our investment program of R8-billion in infrastructure developments at our major airports, including the development of the new airport at La Mercy in Durban,” he said.

As a result of this expenditure, Radebe said, South Africa’s international and regional airports would be able to provide the capacity required for the World Cup.

Leonard Ramatlakane, MEC for Community Safety, who also attended the event, said he was confident that the country would be able to handle the expected increase in both international and domestic travelers beyond 2010.

“We have no doubt about our capacity to deliver airports that will be able to cater to the ever greater needs of passenger loads,” he said.

The Air Traffic and Navigation Services Company has also been busy renewing aeronautical navigation systems and has begun replacing older radar systems across the country, in preparation for the World Cup.

“Safety and security is high on our agenda,” Radebe said.

He also stressed the growing importance of tourism’s contribution, via the airport industry, to the country’s economic vitality.
More than seven million tourists visited South Africa in 2005, generating more than R48-billion in revenue, according to Radebe.
He said tourism also played a direct role in supporting 540 000 jobs and an indirect one in a further 670 000.

As a result of this, Radebe said, South Africa had identified tourism as one of the country’s immediate priorities for future job creation and economic growth.

A five-year plan to increase aviation’s contribution to the tourism sector has been implemented that aims to make South Africa a preferred air travel destination, and which improves airport services.

Around the World


Bits and Bobs from people around the world

The following was submitted by Monique van Schalkwyk

Horrific violence now an everyday sight as the Rainbow Nation ends in a pool of blood.
By Fred Bridgeland in Johannesburg



Oh, cry the beloved country
Read and weep as the horror unfolds and continues to spread ……….

The distinguished anti-apartheid novelist André Brink has shocked many of his politically correct countrymen by warning that football’s World Cup, coming to South Africa in 2010, threatens a “potential massacre which could make the Munich Olympics of a few decades ago look like a picnic outing”.

Brink, whose novels were banned by apartheid governments and who has twice been nominated for the Booker Prize and short-listed several times for the Nobel Prize for Literature, is no everyday scaremonger.

In one of a number of articles he has written about the crises facing South Africa, he said: “For 12 years after our first democratic elections [held in 1994, resulting in Nelson Mandela becoming president] I went out of my way to assure people inside and outside the country who had doubts about the new South Africa that we were moving in the direction of democracy, truth and justice, and that the darker by-products of the change were temporary and superficial accidents. I can no longer do that.”

While South Africa has bathed in the accolade of the Rainbow Nation since the end of apartheid in 1994, a torrent of commentators and swathes of the general public now say that the rainbow’s end has been reached and the nation is sliding back into the storm.

Just this month , Nobel Peace Prize winner archbishop Desmond Tutu said the country had lost its “moral compass and reverence for life“.

He said: “Is it not horrendous for an adult man to rape a nine-month-old baby? [a reference to the country’s plague of baby rape in the belief that sex with infants cures Aids] What has come over us?”

Like many South Africans, Brink is appalled by violent crime levels that are seemingly out of control – he finally felt impelled to speak out when his own daughter, son-in-law and their children were caught in a restaurant hold-up of the sort that has become a near-everyday occurrence.

Five men armed with pistols stormed the Cape Town restaurant where his daughter’s family were dining; ordered everyone to lie face down on the floor and strip themselves of rings, jewelry, watches, cell-phones and wallets. The men then emptied the safe and cash register and beat up and kicked the customers before herding them into a small back room, locking it and making their escape.

Apart from a single paragraph in a small community newspaper, the incident was not reported. “It is too insignificant,” said Brink, “to banal, to commonplace in the new South Africa. No-one has been killed, no-one raped.
It will not even rate as a statistic.”

South Africa now ranks alongside Colombia, Chechnya and the occupied Palestinian Territories as among the most violent places on earth. In a new report, the South African Institute of Race Relations said that one million whites have left the country in the past decade.

This is partly because of the escalating violence, but also because they see no future in a country once proclaimed as “non-racist” but which has implemented a damaging raft of reverse-racist policies with similarities to those adopted by past white governments.
Most of those quitting are highly skilled people such as doctors, nurses and engineers and young people born too late to have ever voted in the apartheid era.

More whites began packing their bags for Europe, North America and Australasia when justice minister Charles Nqakula, responding to a question about the scores of daily murders and hundreds of daily rapes, told parliament that those who complained about crime were “unpatriotic moaners”. He went on: “They can continue to whinge until they’re blue in the face or they can simply leave this country.”

The justice minister’s implication was that only whites “whinged” about the rampant violence. But most of those raped, mugged and killed are black people . One woman, who had been gang-raped and mugged by fellow blacks, and who lives in a paralysis of fear in her township, wrote to a newspaper asking: “Where, honourable minister, do you suggest I go?”

And last week it was too late for 15-month-old Khensani Miteleni to consider going anywhere – she and her mother were caught in one of the near-daily wild west-style gunfights that make Johannesburg’s city centre resemble a war zone.

Violence is just one element of the developing South African crisis:
A vicious succession battle for supremacy is underway inside the ruling African National Congress; thousands of people die of Aids each week and thousands more become infected while president Thabo Mbeki and his health minister, Manto Tshabalala-Msimang, deny there is any link between the HIV virus and Aids (eat more pap) and the Rand has collapsed faster than any other currency this year amid fears that former vice-president Jacob Zuma, who narrowly escaped conviction for rape and is currently on trial for fraud and corruption, will become the next president.

As South Africa slid off the rainbow, one leading newspaper columnist warned: “We have all been lulled into a sense of false security over the past 12 years. We look north to Zimbabwe with pitying eyes and tell ourselves it couldn’t happen here.

“Well, my friends, the seeds have been sown. Just wait for the harvest.”



This contribution is from Carla McClachlan in England

I am going home, I just love the place, its sounds ….. its smells …

I have been a bit slow in reading the last two newsletters as we have been moving and then went on holiday, but now that I have finally gotten down to it, I am enjoying reading through once again.

I don’t actually eat meat (yes I am South African), but still love reading your newsletter.

There is one topic I would like to comment on, your ‘Going home or staying put’ article.

I agree that South Africa is suffering a backlash from apartheid days and that the crime is a sad state of affairs. I feel awful that you and many others have suffered. I am currently living in the UK and to be honest with you, I am more fearful here than back home. Not only of potential attack by individuals but by organized, political groups. I am horrified by what some of the teenagers are capable of here, where they go on sprees of attacks for no purpose whatsoever.

I am mentioning this because in South Africa people are subject to utter poverty and I honestly don’t know how I would react to this situation (poverty stricken) should I be in it. Also, while this is no excuse, for many years black people were subject to the same and worse violence by the white people and for this reason I am not entirely surprised that there is this backlash.

My comparison is because the violence in South Africa comes from a place of desperation and vengeance, whereas here, there is NO reason other than sick pleasure.

I have been out of South Africa for three years now and go home (to Cape Town) every year. We were in Johannesburg this year and was amazed at how well our friends and family are doing. They do stay in these secure villages, but still enjoy a lovely quality of life. We are hoping to be able to go back to South Africa to live next year.

I have two groups of friends that I made while staying in Denmark who are so relieved to be back in South Africa as they found it extremely difficult to keep track of their teenage kids while in Denmark. There is a wholesomeness and old fashioned manners still present in South Africa that just doesn’t seem to exist in Denmark and England. I am saying this from what I have heard from them as I don’t have kids, but I have witnessed some very rude behaviour from kids this end of the equator.

When I moved to Denmark I thought that it epitomized everything I would hope for South Africa, but you know what, they have the highest level of depression and suicide.
People just don’t seem to worry about other people.
In South Africa, people really care, they are friendly and smile so easily. I really enjoyed my time in Denmark and felt very welcome there, but it highlighted to me what not having to rely on anyone resulted in.

I believe that there is a new generation growing up in South Africa that has not been subject to apartheid or national service and frankly don’t give too much of a hoot about it. They are tolerant of all races (and by-the-way I find South Africa one of the most tolerant, non judgmental places I have been to) and will start to influence changes which will make South Africa the absolute best place to be in the world.

I love the place now, the sights, sounds. Even the smell of the place makes me feel ‘home’. I want to be there to be part of the solution, because I admit that solutions are required. It is HOME.

I hope I make some sort of sense. I understand that some people don’t want to be in South Africa for many reasons.
I just happen to not be one of those.
Thank you once again for a fab newsletter.

Very best wishes
Carla McClachlan
England
carla_mclachlan@hotmail.com



This is from Marinda van der Brugghen. Marinda is one of our new subscribers this month.

Hello everybody!

I have been living in Naperville, Illinois, USA since March of this year.
We arrived here in the States in January and stayed in Chicago, Illinois for eight weeks as I gave birth here to my second daughter Storm. I have come to really enjoy where we live and my eldest daughter just enjoys the freedom she has here to run around in the street with her friends ( something she could not do in South Africa). It is very family orientated and that is great!

We still have to get use to the cold winters we have here! Already we have had a few nights where it has gone 3’C past freezing point. We got a taste of the cold when we arrived in January and could not believe that it could get this cold.
We actually do not mind it cause the sun is out and the skies are blue.

The people in the neighbourhood here were so tremendously nice when we moved in. They came over to welcome us and even brought us food.
Amazing!

I have become so used to the safety here and being able to walk with my dog at 22h00 at night and not feeling scared at all!

Thanksgiving is coming up soon and we will spend it with friends at their place so we can see all the traditional things they do and eat on this holiday. My eldest is in school and has already started speaking in an American accent. It is not too bad cause here in Illinois they actually speak a decent dialect.

Wishing you all of the best!
Regards,

Marinda van der Brugghen
Naperville, Il. USA
m.vanderbrugghen@comcast.net



The last contribution is from Sjoerd Walda from New Castle in South Africa

Hi there in Belgium. Not back yet in the good old country?

After living for 40 years in Helmond in Holland, I am back where I grew up as a kid for 14 years in Durban!

I also used to order Boerewors over the internet from a shop in the UK! But boy, was it expensive!
I bought your Biltong Maker through the Internet 5 years ago when i was still living in Holland and it’s still going strong! Thanks a lot as we say here in KZN!

But since 18 months I am now back in Kwazulu-Natal, where I bought a house in Newcastle. I must say that the Boerewors and Droëwors is much cheaper than overseas!!

My name is Sjoerd Walda (male). I was born in Helmond in Holland in 1948. We went to South Africa in 1949 and lived there till 1963.
I went back on holiday 14 times and now I am back for good!
The reason i went to South Africa on holiday so often is because my only sister, who is 5 years older than me, lived in South Africa and in 1965 married a white guy from Durban!

So at the age of 56 I retired and left Holland for good.

Yes there is such a lot of crime here in South Africa and how the country changed since 1963!
But there is only one South Africa with all its traditions and I am very happy here in Newcastle.

I still receive your newsletters and always like to read what South Africans overseas have to say about how much they miss there homeland!!

Kind regards,

Sjoerd Walda
New Castle, South Africa
sjwalda@tiscali.co.za

Something to smile about


Congratulations ….

To all the kids born before the 1980’s !!

First, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank while they carried us.
They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a can, and didn’t get tested for diabetes.
Then after that trauma, our baby cribs were covered with bright colored lead-based paints.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets and when we rode our bikes, we had no helmets, not to mention, the risks we took hitchhiking.

As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags. Riding in the back of a pick up on a warm day was always a special treat.
We drank water from the garden hose and NOT from a bottle.
We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and NO ONE actually died from this.
We ate cupcakes, white bread and real butter and drank soda pop with sugar in it, but we weren’t overweight because……

We were always outside, playing ….

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the street lights came on.

No one was able to reach us all day. And we were O.K!!

We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then ride down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the problem.

We did not have PlayStation’s, Nintendo, X-boxes, no video games at all, no 99 channels on cable, no video tape movies, no surround sound, no cell phones, no personal computers, no Internet or Internet chat rooms ……….

WE HAD FRIENDS and we went outside and found them!

We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no lawsuits from these accidents.
We ate worms and mud pies made from dirt, and the worms did not live in us forever.
We were given BB guns for our 10th birthdays, made up games with sticks and tennis balls and although we were told it would happen, we did not put out very many eyes.
We rode bikes or walked to a friend’s house and knocked on the door or rang the bell, or just yelled for them!

School sports had tryouts and not everyone made the team. Those who didn’t had to learn to deal with disappointment. Imagine that!!
The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law!

These generations has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever!
The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas.

We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned

HOW TO DEAL WITH IT ALL!

And if YOU are one of them!

CONGRATULATIONS!

You might want to share this with others who have had the luck to grow up as kids, before the lawyers and the government regulated our lives for our own good.

And while you are at it, forward it to your kids so they will know how brave their parents were.
Kind of makes you want to run through the house with scissors, doesn’t it?!

Sport talk


Snippets from the papers

Zulu still angling for the big prize
Dolphins allrounder Lance Klusener says he would reconsider his Kolpak status in a heartbeat if he is called up to the Proteas team.
Full Story …

Aussie PM predicts home win in Ashes Series
Prime Minister John Howard predicted Thursday that Australia would regain the Ashes but welcomed the return of “the old rivalry” to the series in recent years in a BBC interview.
Full Story …

Land re-zoning for 2010 stadium to be appealed
The Green Point Common Association wants a firm guarantee that if Cape Town’s 2010 stadium is built on the golf course site, the rest of the common would remain well-managed, public space for ever.
Full Story …

Boks head out for ‘tough’ British tour
Scrumming coach Balie Swart has expressed his satisfaction with the Springbok pack, but also admitted a mighty challenge was awaiting them in Ireland and England over the next month
Full Story …

Some unusual names in World Cup Masterplan
Even in Test match week, amid the pressures of the build-up to the international against Ireland, it has been easy to discern where Springbok coach Jake White’s thoughts lie: Ten months ahead at the 2007 Rugby World Cup.
Full Story …



-Where can you watch rugby on TV?-
Click here to find out where in most countries!
Let’s hear from you too!!


Come on, let’s hear from you too!

Many people subscribe to our newsletter and many more are joining every day. They do so because they enjoy reading it and they like to hear from people in other parts of the world.

They would love to hear from you too!!

Why not put pen to paper (or fingers to the keyboard!), and tell us about anything interesting. About life in your part of the world, what you do and how you live. Perhaps something that happened to you.
You might have a nice recipe to part with or perhaps a question to ask?

Perhaps you have some advice to give?
You never know how you could help somebody else with your own hints and tips.

Of course it does not have to be about Biltong or food. Anything that is of interest is welcome!

Share it with other people around the world!

Boerewors in Europe


Boerewors (Europe only, sorry people!)

We have a freshly made batch in the freezers all vacuum packed and ready to go!
Boeries on the braai!
So if you need Boerewors just email us or call. You can either collect or we can mail it to you.
All our customers in Holland, Belgium and in fact, all over Europe are raving about the packing of and the condition in which the wors arrived at their doorsteps.

Just imagine some “lekker” pap and wors with a nice tomato and onion sauce!

Just give us a call on +32 (16) 53.96.25 or email us.

Our Boerewors is vacuum packed in quantities of about 500 gram.
The normal price is € 8.45 per kg but for the time being we will keep it at only € 7.95 per kg!!

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Droëwors for the UK and Europe!


Droëwors …… a typical South African delicacy all of its own!

Droëwors, as it is known in South Africa, is as much part of the country’s culinary culture as Biltong, Pap, Boerewors and Potjiekos.
Real South African Droë Wors!The spices are of course imported especially from South Africa so you will get the “real” thing!
Unfortunately we are all sold out right now. The droëwors was sold within a week of the announcement of the special pricing! But ….. please place your advance orders for the next batches to make sure you don’t lose out!!

The price will be € 28.00 per kg or € 7.00 per 250 gram packet.

Droëwors travels well and posting is an ideal option.
We can mail it to you in Europe and the UK via priority mail in minimum quantities of 1 kg.
See all the mailing rates by going to
www.boerewors.be

Interested? Give us a call or email.

Lamb on the Spit


Lamb on the Spit ……. something special!

The Braai season is over in Europe (except for some diehards!) but there is always the Spring and Summer of 2007!!

Lamb on the Spit is a way of entertaining as only known by very few mainly because it is thought to be very expensive ……. Not so!

Click to see me big!We will do a lamb on the Spit for parties of between 30 and 50 people for just € 18.00 and € 15.00 a head respectively.

Together with the lamb we will treat you to a big pot of curried potatoes as well as a choice between a pasta salad or three-bean salad. Garlic or bread rolls are included as well.
For venues more than 50 km from our home base in Keerbergen there is a small transport fee.
The barbecue season is almost over but there is always next year.
Start planning now for the Spring and next Summer!
Remember that we are doing these functions only during weekends.

Booking early is essential and you can do so on
+32(16) 53-9625 or email us.

(A Lamb on the Spit can only be done outside because we cook on coals!)


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Previous issues of our Newsletter


You can click on the links below to view some of the previous issues of our newsletter.

November 2005
December 2005
January 2006
February 2006
March 2006
April 2006
May 2006
June 2006
July 2006
August 2006
September 2006
October 2006


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